Profile For Old School

Old School's Info

  • Location:
    Nacogdoches, TX

  • Driving Status:
    Experienced Driver

  • Social Link:
    Old School On The Web

  • Joined Us:
    9 years, 2 months ago

Old School's Bio

No Bio Information Was Filled Out. Must be a secret.

Old School's Photo Gallery Group 1 of 35

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Posted:  2 days, 17 hours ago

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Trucking Life 2.0 - Living It, Loving It!

Thanks everyone!

When I looked at my paycheck today I realized I made a mistake. That total for the first week was 3,220 miles. Next pay period is already looking good too. This particular account works really well for me.

Twosides11, we will definitely meet up sometime. I'm in Cressona, PA all the time. In fact, I'll be there tonight. Once you have your own truck, let me know your truck number and I'll look for you. I suspect you'll be there often.

I got a call today saying they raised my pay by four cents per mile. Haha! One week on the job and I got a raise! confused.gif

Posted:  3 days, 1 hour ago

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Trucking Life 2.0 - Living It, Loving It!

I got started back at Knight on Monday the 15th. They got me a rent car for Sunday, and a hotel room for that same night. They scheduled a physical with their chosen physician Monday morning at 0800. We did the drug testing in Texas before I left for their Gulfport, MS terminal. Once I was cleared to go they assigned me a truck and said "Get after it!" We didn't even do a drive test or anything. They loaded me up with some free Tee-shirts and other trinkets and assigned me a load. I didn't actually get started until Tuesday morning due to waiting on the truck getting detailed and a minor repair issue on the empty flatbed trailer I grabbed at the terminal.

I finished my first week yesterday. By 0800 Tuesday morning I had turned in 3,120 miles of delivered freight. It was a solid week and it felt really great being back in the saddle. We ran four loads. The first load was from Gulfport, MS to Delhi, LA for 239 miles. The second was from Delhi, LA with three stops - Lakeland, FL - Tampa, FL - Palmetto, FL for 825 miles. Then it's back to Delhi for 776 miles. The fourth run was from Delhi to Sidney, OH, then Wooster OH, Farrell, PA, and Riverdale, NJ for 1,380 miles. While finishing up the last leg of that trip I got a pre-plan for a 1,925 mile load that gets me back to Delhi.

I feel like a kid in a candy store! My week went off flawlessly and it feels great to be out here chasing that black ribbon again. I apologize for my not being as active in the forum, it's just that I felt like someone had thrown me a lifeline, and I was focused on making sure I didn't lose my grip on it. I wish each of you continued success and I hope to be a small part of it as I can.

I'm sure some of you are wondering about whether I will go home for Thanksgiving. The answer is negative. I was planning on it, but my wife came down with Covid and she swore to me that she would have the locks changed on the house if I tried to come home. That woman is stubborn! So I will be on the road until she allows me to come home. smile.gif

Posted:  1 week, 3 days ago

View Topic:

Old School vision update

Thanks everyone. My first trip is a three stop load from Delhi, LA to Orlando, Lakeland, and Fort Lauderdale, Florida. This tractor will be my companion...

0005175001637086274.jpg

Posted:  1 week, 4 days ago

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Old School vision update

Bruce, I apologize about answering you so cryptically earlier. I have been working diligently on this problem for the past 14 months, and I was so close to a resolution that I didn't want to mess anything up by posting publicly about what was going on.

I had a very complex retina detachment. My retina tore into several pieces and basically I was blind in that eye. The surgeon I used is considered a world class expert in this type surgery, and he told me from the beginning he didn't really think I'd be able to pass a D.O.T. physical ever again. He just didn't know me well enough to tell me that I can't do something. He did an excellent job on my very stubborn eyeball, and after six surgeries I began to be able to see a little bit with that eye. It has gotten progressively better with time, and he started to express hope that we might get to 20/40 in that eye.

Just a few weeks ago I tried to renew my medical card and I passed the vision test and the physical. That was an exciting day. I contacted Knight and they started the ball rolling to get me back in a truck. Today I passed another physical at their chosen physician and I got issued a shiny red Volvo. I'm sitting in the sleeper right now telling you this news. Tomorrow I start running loads on the same flatbed account that I have enjoyed all these years. It feels like a miracle. It feels very surreal at this point.

Knight has stood by me all this time. They kept my insurance current and kept me listed as an employee. All I had to do was show back up for work, pass the physical, and then they put me in a truck and said, "We are so proud to have you back! Now go get 'em!" I've got to tell you, I have had a great relationship with these guys. When I walked into the office this morning there were all kinds of voices raised saying, "Dale, it's great to see you!" I have given a lot to this company, and they have always reciprocated generously. That's how trucking works. Don't let anybody fool you. I have proven how this performance-based business works over and over. This is just one more piece of evidence that shows trucking companies are fair and generous with the folks who are willing and able to go the extra mile. I have always tried to do just that for them.

I will post some pictures of my new truck tomorrow. For now I am exhausted from a long and fruitful day of getting back in the saddle. I will probably fall asleep with a silly grin on my face - I just can't help it. smile.gif

Posted:  1 week, 4 days ago

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Best way to do a 50/50 Split?

Never take a job where the boss can't explain how he determines your pay. It will never work out to your liking.

Posted:  1 week, 5 days ago

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Old School vision update

Thanks Bruce. There are some new developments, but they are super secret right now.smile.gif

I will update when I can.

Posted:  1 week, 5 days ago

View Topic:

Getting Enough Sleep

Hey Mark, you are in charge of how you manage things. That includes your sleep. There's no law that says you have to get back to work immediately after ten hours. You could take a 13 hour break if you wanted.

However, part of the formula for success at trucking is being able to maximize your available hours for driving. I flip my days and nights all the time. I don't know anything about biorhythms, but I do know about trucking. Leaving three hours on the table everyday amounts close to a hundred dollars per day for me. My biorhythms like that extra 30 grand in the bank.

Get out here and get started. You'll find a lot of days that you don't drive 11 hours. Let's just say you're overthinkibg this. Logistics is far from perfect. There are going to be schedule altering variables everyday. You'll learn to handle it.

Posted:  1 week, 6 days ago

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Schneider National kept my employment record for over 10 yrs

There is no longer any risk for running a corporation now. If a corporation makes extremely poor business decisions, it can count on the US government bailing it out.

That's good Kerry! Corporations go bankrupt daily. C'mon man - let's get real.

Now, as far as what you say about the government propping up some businesses - I agree - they do that, and I don't think it is all that smart. I am no expert on economics, and I know they have justifications for it, but I still don't like it. I have been the primary stock holder in several corporations, Therefore I do not view them as some large and cruel entity that some people do. I started them to provide jobs and hopefully turn a profit. The real world of business is rough and tumble. I got no handouts just because I owned the stock in a corporation. So, please don't try that silly argument with me.

There will always be special interests and lobbyists who can wield influence in economic/political situations involving big business. The number of corporations who benefit from those activities are very few when you look at the total numbers of incorporated businesses.

Posted:  1 week, 6 days ago

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Schneider National kept my employment record for over 10 yrs

Chris, I appreciate your interest in the book. I have got so many things going right now that it has taken a back seat in my priorities. I hope to have it available in about a month. I am formatting it right now, and there is some fine tuning to do to get it ready for publication. It will be available on Amazon, and I will update you guys when it is ready for purchase.

I hope it doesn't take me 4-5 years to get competent. If it does, I guess I just have to keep trucking. ;)

Trucking careers don't fall into place very quickly. That is one of the reasons there is so much driver churn in the industry. Drivers jump in here thinking they can get a grasp on this and do well. Then the realities of life on the road start to wear them down. It certainly took me a good four years before I felt I had gotten my stride and was confident I was doing a really great job at it.

I ask you questions only to make you think about your expectations. Most new drivers expectations are skewed. To earn 80K in trucking is possible, but you will have to get several years behind you to do it. Those first couple of years are defining ones for most of us. Don't let them confirm your bias against trucking companies. You have a lot more to overcome than some because you are already going in thinking the companies are stupid about their policies and the way they do things. We try to set your expectations on a realistic level because we know that will help you survive. We certainly can't force you to think a certain way, but we try to help you realize that maybe many of the things you hold as concerns are misguided and not helpful to your success.

Posted:  2 weeks ago

View Topic:

Schneider National kept my employment record for over 10 yrs

if I can make 80k/year once I'm competent, I'll be happy.

What if it takes you four or five years to get competent? Will that 80K still be sounding good?

What if you find out the revenues you are producing for the company far exceed the 80K you are getting paid? Are you going to feel you are creating excessive value but not being rewarded well enough?

80K is possible, but it is also way high when you look at the average truck driver pay. You will have to really be good to hit those kind of numbers. There are plenty of drivers here who make that kind of money, I hope you can learn a few things from them.

Posted:  2 weeks ago

View Topic:

Make the best of it

Good for you! I always enjoy taking a break on the road. There are those weeks where you just feel you deserve a nice break. Enjoy yourself!

Posted:  2 weeks ago

View Topic:

Schneider National kept my employment record for over 10 yrs

Why doesn't your pride also come with an desire to not be exploited? Don't you have enough pride in what you do not to get used hard and fed little?

Chris, that's a fair question. Probably misguided, but I am going to give you credit for asking a fair question.

Tell us how you know or define when you are being exploited. Is there a magic number? You mentioned earlier about working really tough jobs where you made less than 30 grand. So, if those jobs paid 40 grand would you feel you were being treated fairly, or would you still feel exploited?

I think you could help us out by clarifying some of your remarks or feelings about not being paid a fair wage. There must be a number somewhere that makes you feel like you are being treated right. Can you share it with us? How do you come up with that number? How often do you up the ante and decide, "Wait a minute, that number is no longer acceptable."

Here's a true story...

I started my trucking career at 27 cents per mile. That is a number that would be laughed at today, yet that was only about nine years ago. I was in a group of about fifty people that started at that company in an orientation class together. After a year of busting my tail I found out there was only one other person from that orientation class that had stayed the course with me for our rookie year. I made fifty thousand dollars that year, and I was damn proud of the job I had done. I don't know why the other 48 people quit, but I am certain a lot of them felt they were being exploited.

You see, trucking has some strange effects on people. Most newbies think this job is way too stressful for the pay they make. I never felt that way. I always focused on learning how to be better at it. I never once felt exploited. I felt like I had a lot to learn, and I did my best everyday to learn how to be proficient at the job. If you are inefficient at a performance-based job you will feel exploited. That's because you will be expending effort that doesn't result in good returns. That is defined as inefficiency, not exploitation. Every rookie truck driver suffers from it, but many of them blame it on the company abusing them, or exploitation as you refer to it. You must recognize the real problem if you ever want to fix it. Blaming our poor performance on exploitation is a cop out. It happens daily in the trucking world. Get in line and be ready to join the throngs of folks who feel that way.

People are bad about underestimating trucking. You are doing it all the time. You gave me a good chuckle when you tried to tell us how dangerous cutting Christmas trees with a chainsaw was. It shows us just how juvenile your understanding is about trucking. There is nothing wrong with that and I am not even trying to be critical. To be honest I am trying to help you understand the career. I don't feel I am wasting my time with you. I am hoping you might learn something in here. Whether you do or not will be up to you. We try and we have been known to fail, but it is fun teaching you because there are so many other folks who are listening and gaining knowledge from our discussions with you.

Posted:  2 weeks ago

View Topic:

Schneider National kept my employment record for over 10 yrs

Most of what I say gets censored so I don't put much effort into my posts

Well if you were honest, you would realize that most of what you say gets posted. Some of it gets posted under several different names. We have been overly generous with you. I think it is because we hold out a little hope for you. We will see how you turn out. So far you are still struggling to get up to a level where you can make a successful trucking career. We have certainly allowed you to have your say in here, but we would like to think we have helped you raise yourself to a higher level. So far we are still watching and waiting.

Posted:  2 weeks ago

View Topic:

Schneider National kept my employment record for over 10 yrs

The American work ethic left when Americans stopped being paid well when adjusting for inflation.

Chris, it is clear that you and I are living in two different worlds. My work ethic is not based on how much someone is willing to pay me. It is based on my personal integrity and pride. I like to sleep well at night, therefore I give it my all when I am working for someone. My income is based on my work ethic and it happens to be very good. You see I believe and have proven that when I do a great job, I end up getting paid a fair and substantial wage. That's just how it works in trucking.

In your world you have no definition of a work ethic. You may use the term, but it is not anything close to what is described as an ethic. A good way to describe ethics is motivation based on ideas of right and wrong. I am convinced that when I put on my hard hat and give myself to an employer, they should get the very best from me. That is my work ethic. That is what is right for me to do. My work ethic is based solely on my involvement. You like to put the onus on the employer. You get things all backwards. You want to hold yourself back unless you feel you are being rewarded in a way that suits you. In your world the employer motivates you by the carrots they dangle in front of you. That is not based on your personal integrity. That is not any sort of a work ethic. That is like extortion. It says, "I will do such and such, but only if you can give me this much."

It seems odd that you don't notice how your method has kept you on the sidelines while others in here are working diligently as truck drivers. It will probably surprise you if you do land a truck driving job. You will discover the company is stupid and not paying you what you are worth. Then again it may not surprise you because you have already discovered this at so many other jobs. I hope you can get it all figured out, but I am afraid you have way underestimated this career. It sounds good to you while you are on the outside looking to get in, but you will find a totally different perspective when you start trying to make a good show at it.

Posted:  2 weeks ago

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Schneider National kept my employment record for over 10 yrs

Do I have a case of discrimination or a lawsuit for them keeping employment records for 12 years?

Honestly I started to laugh when I first read this. Then I realized it wasn't funny at all. Then I almost started to cry.

I want to know what ever happened to our good old American work ethic? When I was a kid every able bodied man I knew was working and doing what he could to make sure his family was clothed, fed and had shelter. There was no such thing as stimulus money and there was certainly no imaginations about a "basic universal income" that we hear politicians promoting these days. This isn't the first person we've had in here lately who thinks they have grounds for a lawsuit just because they are having an issue getting hired as a truck driver. It's disturbing.

I had a terrible time getting hired when I first started this career. I have never been able to figure out what the problem was, but I never dreamed of hiring a lawyer. It seems so many folks want to just litigate for income rather than work for it. Our government offers to give us money for not working. On what level does that make sense. Our attorneys offer to give us money by punishing entities who have done us no wrong. It's unconscionable. If a corporation has wronged someone willfully then I am all for them being punished. If they have hurt someone willfully and knowingly, they deserves our scrutiny and legal action. When they don't want to hire you because of an old safety violation, but are willing to offer you a path to employment by asking you to establish yourself somewhere else first, then you have a golden opportunity before you. Take it and show some pride in yourself and your abilities. Get out there and establish yourself as a professional who loves what he is doing.

I have noticed a trend lately of people who hear about a strong demand for drivers, and they interpret that as an easy way to get into a driving career. There are still standards that stand in the way of becoming a truck driver. There are good reasons for those standards. They still apply during times of high demand and low supply. This is a safety sensitive position. Truck driving is still listed in the top ten most dangerous jobs in the country. Any trucking company has a right to refuse employment to someone with past safety issues. How do we overcome that problem? Schneider gave the formula that most other companies use. Go get yourself a job somewhere else first. Prove to us that you can operate safely and them we will re-hire you. I have seen this done at Knight on many occasions. There is nothing wrong with that approach. It is like an olive branch being extended to someone who has had past safety issues. Here is the way to get back in. If a person really wants back in they would take the offer and run with it. If their first response is to call an attorney, I highly doubt their sincerity in wanting to be a professional at all. Trucking is all about performance. If we screw up we suffer the consequences. If we can prove ourselves worthy, the sky is the limit.

This is a career where we stand or fall on our own merit. All the attorneys in the world cannot change that.

Posted:  2 weeks, 4 days ago

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Ok i've done it. Signed on for swift cdl school. What am i in for?

Mike, you've been considering this for atleast five years now. Congratulations on finally doing it!

You can expect to be sent home if you can't pass a hair follicle drug test.

You can expect to be challenged by the schooling and training.

You can expect even more challenges after they give you your own truck.

Swift has a great program for training new drivers. Pay attention and be diligent. Commit yourself to success. Don't hang with the losers and complainers in your class. Find the most serious student and make friends with them. The two of you night be able to help each other.

Forget and ignore all the stupid stuff you've heard or read about Swift. They are going to treat you as a professional. Make sure you conduct yourself like one. Create a relationship with them based on trust. All will be well if you can do that.

Posted:  2 weeks, 4 days ago

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My thoughts on company websites.

Hey Chris, It seems you want specific information. That is something that is hard to come by in this industry. They can tell you how much your rate of pay is, but that does not tell you how much you can expect to earn. In a performance-based enterprise you are in control of that part of the equation. I make a lot more than some of my peers. We are all pretty much working at the same rate though. Trucking is unique in this. It is one big reason why drivers get churned. Most of them don't ever lay hold of the concepts of being in control of how much they make. They want to blame the company for starving them and not allowing them to make any money. How silly that sounds to experienced drivers who have been making great money at this for years.

There is no way for these companies to take a look at you and guess how productive you will be. You hold the key to your income out here. There is no way they can tell you how much you are going to make when you are competing with their other drivers for loads. If you want back in this career, then jump in and get yourself established as a top tier driver. That is how you get to the point of enjoying this career and doing well at it. The information on the company websites has no way of predicting how you will conduct yourself out here. You are the only one who can answer the questions you seek. And you will never figure that out while sitting on your couch at home perusing trucking websites.

Posted:  2 weeks, 4 days ago

View Topic:

Seven years in

Major props to you Steve!

I would guess that the new folks in here have no idea how much of a major accomplishment this is. It is very rare to find someone with the tenacity and commitment to stay with one particular trucking company for that many years. Of course I know Steve has had his doubts at times and considered moving on, but he stuck with it and it appears to be working out very well. Congratulations!

For those of you reading this, it is really unusual in this industry to not move around and try new companies. It is also advantageous to stick with it at one place until you can really establish yourself well. That is what Steve has done. People up and move on for the slightest of reasons. It is so easy to go find another job in trucking if you have a decent record behind you. The allurement of greener pastures fools a lot of us into being transitory in our trucking careers. There are a lot of hidden benefits to sticking with one company, but you have got to be a worthy driver to uncover those benefits. Slackers gain nothing by staying the course. That's why they always want to move on. Diligent drivers who build solid relationships of trust with their support team in the office learn the generous benefits of being a longtime top tier driver at a company that knows and trusts them.

Steve has demonstrated his abilities, and it has worked out well for him. I salute you Steve, and wish the country had more drivers like you. Keep up the great work!

Posted:  2 weeks, 5 days ago

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Speeding ticket in personal vehicle, do I need to tell my DM before court?

Sorry that happened Davy!

Unfortunately you are supposed to report it to the company.

When you are playing with your toys you are going to have to be a little more careful. You're a trucker now. You are sentenced to a life of driving slow and careful. Once you get over 70 mph bad things are going to happen. smile.gif

Posted:  2 weeks, 5 days ago

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Would I face hostility if I went into trucking?

Do you think my family member is right that I would run into hostility or trouble from other truckers because of my background?

You will find people in trucking who are very well educated and some who are ordinary, good-hearted working people with little or no education. It makes no difference to the employers. They are looking for responsible adults who can pass a fairly simple physical and get the job done. That is all that matters. Everything else about you is secondary and not considered detrimental to your effectiveness at the job.

If you think you have reasons to fear concerning discrimination in the trucking industry, I urge you to drop them. I have witnessed the open arms of this industry for years now. You have nothing to fear. If you are capable of doing a great job, then you can keep a good job in this business. I have seen folks both old and young. I have met folks in their eighties still going strong as drivers and others in their early twenties who are just getting started. I know skinny ones, overweight ones, dark skinned and fair ones. You can name the gamut of people types and I have encountered them on the road. We have one thing in common—well, maybe two or three. We are humans. We are adventurous and highly motivated to do a great job.

This is a job where people leave you alone and expect you to get things done. They are not overly concerned about your lifestyle or your habits. As long as those things don’t interfere with your ability to be a productive driver and a safe operator of a commercial vehicle, you will be given responsibility and the rewards which come with it. I have met all kinds of people on the road. I have never met anyone who felt they were being discriminated against. Even the fellow I met in Kansas City wearing a mini-skirt and six-inch stiletto heels seemed quite pleased with the way he was welcomed into the truck driving career.

Unfortunately truck drivers are stereotyped as big burly rednecks with loud mouths and brazen personalities. Of course there are a few like that, but by and large this is the most diverse work force you will ever come across in any industry. You have nothing to fear as far as your question goes. Getting started in trucking is not always easy, but it is not for any of the reasons you are currently concerned with.

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