Profile For Steve L.

Steve L.'s Info

  • Location:
    FL

  • Driving Status:
    Experienced Driver

  • Social Link:

  • Joined Us:
    4 years, 2 months ago

Steve L.'s Bio

No Bio Information Was Filled Out. Must be a secret.

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Posted:  5 days, 15 hours ago

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Advice from company drivers

I started with Schneider as a company driver and stayed with them for two years. Operated out of their Lebanon, TN center.

Everything they promised was true. I only left for another company driver position that is Southeast regional.

I recommend you check schneiderjobs.com for the position you are applying for. There might be information there you want to verify with a recruiter. LeAnne (Lebanon recruiter) was terrific. No bs. No lies.

I hope this helps.

Posted:  5 days, 23 hours ago

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Training Starts Monday At McElroy. I Need Advice!

Bring your positive attitude and follow directions.

Congratulations!

Posted:  5 days, 23 hours ago

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Supreme Court rules in favor of truckers

Seems more like a matter of not being required to use arbitration than anything else.

Even if this gives the Plaintiffs a better chance at a big settlement, it’s a class action suit and usually only the attorneys get rich off of those.

Some of these “independent contractors” are like going through trade school to be a plumber and thinking you’ll magically come out the owner of the next Roto-Rooter.

Posted:  1 week ago

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Passed my CDL

Congratulations!

Posted:  1 week, 4 days ago

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What's the Best Way to Prepare for Agility for Truck School?

Doug, you’re doing great! The only things I’d add are:

1. Carry a 35lb weight 50’. Schneider made us carry a weight about 25’ and checked heart rate after.

2. Duck walk eight feet. That’s about the width of a trailer.

Keep pressing on. I hope this helps.

Posted:  2 weeks ago

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Fired for accident and not sure what to do.

Ian, you are looking for others to answer a question that we CAN'T answer. Whether or not you will be hired?

This website doesn't guarantee jobs.

I believe you're in a place where ONLY YOU can go through this and come out the other side. We all handle adversity in our own way. You'll handle it and move on. Whether you're successful in getting another driving job remains to be seen. And maybe it isn't meant to be. At least for now.

Your preventable accident was PREVENTABLE. BY YOU. Accept that, admit that and move on. How could you have prevented it? Simple; you were getting fatigued and you failed to get yourself off the road. It could've resulted in a death. If I can't haul a load any further because of fatigue (or any other reason), I call in, tell dispatch and they can either reschedule the appointment or have another driver come and relay the load. If they fire me, they'll have to explain why. Probably to a lawyer. But I never get to that point because I look ahead and don't put myself or the company, in that position.

If you discuss the accident in an interview, you'd better be able to explain what YOU learned and what YOU could do differently, so as not to put your prospective new employer in the position of battling a lawsuit.

I hope this helps.

Posted:  2 weeks, 2 days ago

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Training is done, rookie solo driver next week

Congratulations!

I prefer the AMT, but (for me) the most important thing was mastering the steep downhills in manual mode. It was different, not difficult. And in Atlanta or Chicago traffic, I’ll take the AMT all day everyday.

Posted:  2 weeks, 2 days ago

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Newbie needs more advice... sorry guys

Jared; look at Schneiderjobs.com and look for the position you applied for. It should list a pay. But that may be an average which includes experienced drivers.

When you do talk to Schneider, ask them what you can expect first year and what increases there are. E.g. when I started with them, the pay started at $.30/mile, but I was at $.38 by the end of year one. Plus there was a $.02/mile bonus paid quarterly. That was an extra $600/qtr. for me. However, your bonus may be different since it’s a dedicated account.

Schneider’s answers to these questions (for me) were exactly what happened. No bait and switch from the recruiter. I was OTR, but did the Washington Courthouse stuff a number of times. Their dispatch crew there was great.

I hope this helps.

Posted:  2 weeks, 3 days ago

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I GOT MY CDL FROM SMITH AND SOLOMON

Congratulations! This is GREAT to hear.

Kudos, Kudos, Kudos!

YOU did it!!! Wonderful news and I hope you have a fantastic weekend!

Posted:  2 weeks, 3 days ago

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CDL GRAD / DUIs

Really? 22 years ago? I know Some companies are strict, but I didn’t think 22 years WITHOUT a DUI would be a problem.

Hmm.

Posted:  2 weeks, 4 days ago

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I've just received an unsolicited email message from a CDL recruiter.

Most of your questions will be answered, some in a thing companies do called Orientation.

If you’re lonely, get off your rear, away from the computer and get involved in a church or community service organization. It might help you shed those pounds you’ve talked about. And it’ll boost your self esteem.

Posted:  2 weeks, 5 days ago

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Many drivers like to use an old-fashioned road atlas.....and the telephone....but...

Speaking of technology, is it possible TruckingTruth has attracted the first person who just might be negatively impacted by autonomous trucks? By the time Todd makes the move...well, ya know.

Or is Todd really a “bot” honing his skills in preparation for the next political election?

Posted:  2 weeks, 5 days ago

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Really new and seeking advice

I started with Schneider four years ago OTR and did some dedicated for a few days at a time. I don’t know where you live or what the dedicated is. But Target dedicated out of Stuart’s Draft, VA was great. All drop/hook. Walmart dedicated out of Washington Courthouse, Ohio was good, but the West VA backroads took some getting used to. Working with the store people was great.

Schneider was a great company for me to start with and I recommend them to anyone looking for a solid company.

I hope this helps.

Posted:  2 weeks, 6 days ago

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New Year, New Moderator!

Congratulations!

Posted:  2 weeks, 6 days ago

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Which companies have actually ACCEPTED you without any immediate

“Do I have to take some crappy job like being a janitor for a year or flipping burgers at McDonalds for some time to go from disability to trucking?”

You’re your own worst enemy. You think certain jobs are beneath you. That kind of thinking frustrates employers. I’ve been an employer, an employee and yes, served in the military for many years.

If you think any job is beneath you, when you haven’t worked outside of home in more than a decade, you are the definition of clueless.

You say you’re tired of being poor. Well not tired enough. The most successful people are willing to do WHATEVER it takes. You think you’re poor? Watch the real life story portrayed in The Pursuit of Happyness with Will Smith. You apparently have plenty of time for it.

When you are willing to scratch and claw your way out of the depths of despair. Willing to leave your comfort zone and step into the unknown, heed the advice of experts and do everything it takes, you’ll begin to appreciate those who ARE willing to do “crappy” jobs. Those people will never be dependent on the handouts of others.

Get up, dress up and show up. Otherwise...

Posted:  2 weeks, 6 days ago

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O/O in trucking vs in hotshoting

Sorry for my decimal mistake here.

Likewise, an O/O can say they made $5,000 net in three weeks. But does it make sense that translates into $600,000 a year? I’d be surprised if that same O/O nets 20% ($120,000) of that.

Suffice it to say you can make $60k/year as a company without the headaches of O/O.

Posted:  2 weeks, 6 days ago

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O/O in trucking vs in hotshoting

George, you obviously are an intelligent thinker. Trust your gut on this.

As a company driver, getting paid by the mile, I could tell you of the weeks I’ve done 3,000+ paid miles. But that doesn’t mean I do 150,000 miles a year. Likewise, an O/O can say they made $5,000 net in three weeks. But does it make sense that translates into $600,000 a year? I’d be surprised if that same O/O nets 20% ($120,000) of that.

Also, you said you only planned on driving 3yrs before taking a break. I think it’s unrealistic to expect that plan to be successful. You might be able to do it and I’d be happy to hear of your success. But the first year is a lot of learning. You don’t know what challenges you’ll have to overcome. Heck, some days just turning 600 miles without hitting anything is an accomplishment.

You sound very smart. Keep that open mind, but never lose that BS detector in yourself.

Posted:  2 weeks, 6 days ago

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Do sleepers have microwave ovens in them?

Todd, we aren't trying to beat you up. I would agree with Brett's assessment saying you do ask questions of which our answers can help other newbies. It's your responses to what we say that are disturbingly bizarre. You show no conceptual understanding of this lifestyle.

We are people of action. Truck drivers are decisive, they are focused, they thrive on getting things accomplished. If we have three and a half days to get from Denver, CO over to Portland, Oregon, and then down to Los Angeles, CA in the dead of winter, the last thing on our mind is how much time we are going to have to comb our hair and shave. We are going to bust our tail just to "git 'er done." We are not going to be wishing we could unionize ourselves and demand less stringent job requirements.

We love getting things accomplished, and if that requires sacrifices such as driving all night for three nights in the snow, we gladly take that bull by the horns and conquer it. We don't give excuses. We don't back down. "I can't," or "this is too hard" is not part of our conversation. We are doers. We leave the dreamers far behind us with each new sunrise. We don't back down, we don't give up, we are our own driving force, full of motivation and willingness.

We are never satisfied until we've gotten the present task before us accomplished. At that point we are already eager for the next challenge. If we've worked seventy hours we're wishing we could just get in another 15 to cap off a really nice week. We push all the limits, we are eager to get more done this week than we did the last. We are goal oriented.

You talk a lot about your time in boot camp, and your military service. Ask yourself, "Could I do all that again at this point in my life?" If your response to that is doubtful, then there's no way you'll survive the trucking career.

Old School, thank you for this! I agree and believe this is so true.

Thanks for the great reminder of what AND WHO we are.

Drive on!

Posted:  3 weeks, 1 day ago

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Is being a company driver competitive by nature?

I mean this as respectfully as I can be; spend more time in the High Road Training Program and less time posting questions in this forum. I say that because I think it'll be more helpful to you.

All companies are not the same and all people are not the same. Some dispatchers understand the concept of teamwork and some don't care. The ones that don't care usually won't last, but you don't know which one you're going to get. Ergo, all you can do is YOUR best. Likewise, not all drivers understand teamwork between them and the dispatcher. Those drivers either learn that or move out the door.

We've probably all experienced a time where someone else got what we thought we deserved. Whether it was in trucking or not. That's just life. Not always fair, but you keep on keepin' on. Strive to be the best and you WILL get special treatment. Do mediocre work and you'll ALSO get special treatment.

Unless a great deal has changed in the last four years, you can do the HRTP, put out the cash for your permit and have it done in a matter of a few days. I did it and you can too! Got my permit on my 53rd birthday.

Until you get your permit and head off to training, much of the information you are seeking won't make any difference at all. Even then, some of it is subject to change.

Get your permit, interview the companies that best suit your needs AND hire in your area. Then, get out there and get started.

I hope this helps.

Posted:  3 weeks, 2 days ago

View Topic:

What is the toughest single skill to master as a student semi driver?

Dave wrote:

double-quotes-start.png

I interpreted the question as asking what is the most important thing to master, and I still want to stress patience as the foundation for all skill building.

double-quotes-end.png

I agree, without patience you cannot successfully build any skills.

I was merely stating a fact Dave, patience is not a skill.

Geez Louise! Have a sense of humor. You seem to imply that patience cannot be improved upon. If that’s true...well, I’d bet some dispatchers would disagree. I know I’m more patient today than I was a few years ago. But you’re the expert, right?

Seriously though, my offering of patience as a skill was a little tongue-in-cheek.

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