Comments By G-Town

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  • G-Town
  • Joined:
  • 4 years, 5 months ago
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Posted:  1 week, 2 days ago

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Got bucked off the bronco (I flipped), taking some time to recover, and getting back in the saddle!

Ironically enough, I-476, aka The Blue Route, passes through Springfield PA in this section of the road. Been on this road hundreds of times...

Glad you are okay Jay.

Posted:  1 week, 2 days ago

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Views From the Office Window (Post Yours Please!)

Sweet!

Posted:  1 week, 2 days ago

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Walmart Private Fleet

Turtle wrote:

I'm telling you guys this not to bust on Joe, but to show you just how easily your day can fall apart. He's a professional with 39 years of trucking experience, but he's still vulnerable to mistakes as much as anyone else.

Totally agree with this!

The dreaded “yellow pole deer“. These typically protect dock walls/fences or other fixed components that could be easily damaged at all the Walmart stores.

The G.O.A.L. at older stores with tight spacing and limited set-up room, takes on specific meaning; and becomes more about mapping a mental picture of obstacles and the relative risk of hitting them. The yellow poles are always a big risk...

0939634001581365311.jpg

Posted:  2 weeks, 1 day ago

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Trying to narrow down schools

Rob wrote...

I may apply to TMC and Roehl, but most likely will choose Prime based upon my own preferences, and if they accept me.

Companies regularly reject candidates for numerous reasons and apply these reasons without notice, at their discretion.

This is why it’s recommended to apply to multiple companies and be prepared to choose from one that actually chooses you.

Posted:  2 weeks, 1 day ago

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Trying to narrow down schools

Donna I am doing it ...yah baby!! I have got to get to where I can take the hit for no income for a month...mid March til first if April. Wish I could go noooowwww 😂😁 So do you think it's too early to send in those apps since I can't leave immediately,or should I wait??

I think you can begin to send out applications by 3rd week of Feb. Like Donna said, you will get quick responses once you apply and more attention from recruiters. My only suggestion is do not put all of your eggs in one basket. Wait until you have several invitations to attend Paid CDL Training Programs and then do some research to determine the better fit.

If you haven't already, invest quality time reviewing and studying these links. Use this time to effectively prepare...set reasonable expectations, and begin building your knowledge base.

Good luck!

Posted:  2 weeks, 1 day ago

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Preparing for a Trucking Career with Roehl

Congratulations!

Posted:  2 weeks, 1 day ago

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Troops into Transportation

Well done. Congratulations!

Posted:  2 weeks, 1 day ago

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Request Advice for Private CDL Schools in the NJ or PA

Would you pls advise me if you are familiar with those schools and is there any other option you may credit for?

We honestly do not recommend private truck driving schools...

Here is why: Why I Prefer Company Paid Training

I have several suggestions for you to consider...start by reviewing and studying these links:

And then, spend some time reviewing your options with Paid CDL Training Programs and then once you are ready use this link to Apply For Paid CDL Training.

Good luck!

Posted:  2 weeks, 1 day ago

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PackRat's 2020 Daily Driving Diary

My condolences PackRat.

Posted:  2 weeks, 1 day ago

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Is This For Real?

Yes it’s for real, and was on US trucks many decades ago, under mount and some trailers had sleeper compartments in the trailer nose.

Prevalent in the 30s and early 40s. No longer legal, not sure when that occurred, but tractor sleepers were the norm mid 40s to current.

Posted:  2 weeks, 2 days ago

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Turns out I cant go out of state either

Auggie wrote:

double-quotes-start.png

...or

Try to get a local gig driving a straight truck under 26k GVW. This does not require a CDL. At least you will be gaining some experience operating a large vehicle.

Good luck Moe.

double-quotes-end.png

I drive a straight truck a couple times a week. There is no comparison. Plus the backing is "backwards" compared to a combination.

I'd rather drive a tractor with a pup. More maneuverable.

I am aware of that Auggie.

However Moe does not have his CDL. His options are limited, let’s offer him solutions that are realistic.

Posted:  2 weeks, 4 days ago

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Eye Candy

My favorite “small window” Pete Conventional trucks.

Early 70’s 359 0073348001580570148.jpg

1960-62 351 0232990001580570216.jpg

1963 351 needle-nose day cab 0989361001580570413.jpg

1967-68 big grill 359. 0422921001580570517.jpg

1972 359 Dump truck 0403403001580571043.jpg

Late 1930s - early1940s 334. This is when they were built by T.A. Peterman, a Washington lumberman who In the late 20s began rebuilding surplus military equipment to haul his building products to market. Thus “Peterbilt” 0449335001580571318.jpg

Posted:  2 weeks, 4 days ago

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Unemployed again, and tired...

I was in my 50s when I got my CDL, turning 61 in March. Many of us on the forum started trucking later in life.

I suggest investing quality time with these links...

Good luck.

Posted:  2 weeks, 4 days ago

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Turns out I cant go out of state either

...or

Try to get a local gig driving a straight truck under 26k GVW. This does not require a CDL. At least you will be gaining some experience operating a large vehicle.

Good luck Moe.

Posted:  2 weeks, 6 days ago

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Walmart?

Posted:  2 weeks, 6 days ago

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Driving experience before trucking

Handling traffic congestion in and around urban areas is different for everyone. I grew up in the North East, 'nuff said.

However like everything else in this business; experience is the absolute best teacher.

Posted:  2 weeks, 6 days ago

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Flatbed Variety

Turtle Protege' AKA Rob D wrote in response to Doyenne...

As I understand it, a heavy weight load like this cannot be put in a dry van because a standard forklift can't load it. Small heavy loads like this are generally loaded with a crane. You can't load a dry van with a crane.

There was another thread that I couldn't find where the driver on this forum took a load that should have been in a flatbed. They had a special forklift at the shipper, but not at the receiver. He had to leave the trailer because the receiver needed to secure a special forklift to extract the load.

Plus, as Spaceman Spiff points out about exposure to elements for titanium, flatbed loads don't require as much protection for the elements. Tarps provide some protection from the elements, but not necessarily as much as a sealed dry van.

That's a pretty darn good reply Rob. I'd like to expand upon this a bit...because to me, this is an interesting topic.

Without knowing the underlying Logistical issues to this load, it's very difficult to apply conventional logic and conclude "why" this was the chosen solution. It does seem to be overkill. We (truckers & trucking companies) are an intrinsic part of the supply chain (front-end or back-end) that in many cases must respond and quickly adjust to the Just-In-Time needs of a very demanding customer base. I'd suggest loading this on a 48' or 53' flatbed was due to one of the following; the path of least resistance was taken (as such, smaller equipment; straight truck-stake body for instance, is not practical for OTR coast-to-coast operation) or the customer required the carrier or shipper to expedite 3 rods for reasons that are unspecified (damage from the original larger load, who really knows?). Regardless...Spaceman benefited from whatever circumstance lead to this result.

"Some days you are the bat, some days you are the ball". Cool beans!

As far as some of the equipment explanations; a load like this can easily be "picked" from the side, something impossible to perform with a fully enclosed dry van. "Yes" a crane can be used, however I'd suggest that many loads like this are loaded and unloaded from the side with a forklift designed for such an application. The other tangible reason it's on a flat bed is possibly due to the almost infinite ways it can be secured in place (with downward force), something that becomes far more difficult and precarious within a standard dry van. In addition the floor capacity on most flatbeds is higher than that of a standard dry van. 4800 lbs in a 12 square feet (8' x 16") area is very dense and compact. In contrast the most dense lading I haul in a Walmart dry van is water pallets, each weighing about 2200 lbs, occupying approximately 18 square feet of floor area per pallet. Flatbeds typically have a heavy sub frame running the length of the trailer. Standard dry vans do not.

One last point here...although not as prevalent now, many LTL carriers like ABF, CF (now defunct), Roadway and others had tarp top (aka covered wagon) dry vans that when the tarp is removed, allowed for easy overhead loading and unloading of large objects. These vans were sometimes purpose built or re-purposed from older equipment and relied on a reinforced, heavier gauge top and bottom rail (cord) to compensate for the lack of a full roof that normally completes the overall structural integrity of the van. Some by design also had sub frames, increasing weight capacity ****il the advent of the curtain-side flatbed design). Container shipping companies have similar equipment with 20' and 40' corrugated steel, International Shipping Containers (ISO) that have removable soft tops enabling overhead loading and unloading.

Posted:  3 weeks ago

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Best San Antonio area CDL A school?

Errol asked an important question...

So, you didn't mention this part: do your Race Car Guys have an experienced driver who can show you the ropes?

Yes, there is “that”. “Geez, how tough can this be”, right? Very tough. Having a fresh CDL does not make you a truck driver. First time you are required to park the race rig at a truck stop...will provide all of the input you need to realize “this” is not easy.

In addition and just as important, will their insurance company underwrite an entry level driver with no experience? I suggest asking them before going too much further.

Good luck.

Posted:  3 weeks, 1 day ago

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Eye Candy

Annie wrote:

It's just SO incredible how you know your stuff, G~! ;) (Wasn't the ole' Petey pretty, though?) << I learned how to drive in that gal..that is our driveway. Legalities nonewithstanding, haha!!!

And here, I thought it was a FL/White... what do 'I' know?!? Just an aspiring (starving) artist, LoL~!

Thank you Annie, that is so thoughtful of you to say.

My love of trucks and trucking began a very long time ago, having the innate ability to differentiate a Mack B-61 from a White 9000 before I could add and subtract. I was an odd kid. I had every book written on the subject, and also had the benefit of my Dad who was a printer working for a company that did advertising high-quality brochures for numerous heavy truck manufacturers of the 60's and 70's. He always brought home the proofs for me to look at and study. My most memorable event as a kid was a trip to one of his customers, the Autocar assembly plant in Exton PA. I wish I could find the photos he took of me that captured the sheer delight on my face.

No idea why, but I could not get enough of it then,...and still can't. I totally enjoy sharing my knowledge with others of like-mind, similar interest, and curiosity. I do not consider it exceptional or even incredible, just a part of my DNA with no explanation of how it happened.

"Yes" Annie, your Petey was one cool ride and seriously "purdie". It's great you had an opportunity to drive an iconic part of trucking history. Although I appreciate all of the Pete models, for me the "small window" 359 conventional of the late 60's and early 70's epitomizes the hey-day of the long-nose, large grill conventional. When I have more time I'll post some of my favorite Petey Pictures; with restored examples from the 50s through the 80s.

Be safe everyone. Peace.

Posted:  3 weeks, 1 day ago

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Driver fatality

It breaks my heart to hear about anybody losing their life while trying to provide for their families. Hearing stories of this sort is one reason I have no interest in tankers, especially hazmat tankers. From what I've seen the pay is similar to pulling other freight that won't explode.

Same here.

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