Comments By Nate_K

https://cdn.truckingtruth.com/images/become-truck-driver.jpg avatar
  • Nate_K
  • Joined:
  • 3 years, 8 months ago
  • Comments:
  • 110

Page 2 of 6

Previous Page
Next Page
Go To Page:    

Posted:  3 years, 6 months ago

View Topic:

HOS violation

So last night while sleeping I hear a banging on my door. Now I am at a customer and not a truck stop so I automatically assume it's another driver.

I get up and it is security telling me I have to go to another location to sleep.

I explain to him that my hours are expired but he wants no part in it and says I must relocate.

So I stay below 4th gear and creep the mile up the road to where he wants me to go but my pc starts going nuts for a violation.

In the remarks I put the comment "Forced to move" but I realize it doesn't matter.

My question is what is my punishment gonna be? How much is the fine and such?

Posted:  3 years, 6 months ago

View Topic:

11/3 plan from Roehl, maybe Schneider?

I am on the Roehl 7/4, 7/3 plan. I am gonna get home a day late this time but never happened before.

Posted:  3 years, 6 months ago

View Topic:

Worked for Roehl, questions concerning their contract (75k+ miles)

You will be happy with Roehl.

Been out on my own for a few weeks and so far I am very happy. Getting good miles, got a great truck, getting good loads, and my fleet manager is very receptive.

I ask to be routed away from the snow and they do it. I ask them to contact a customer and see if we can get in early and they do it.

99% of Roehl drivers I have spoken with love it here. Even the few who were leaving said they would come back in a second if the new job didn't work out.

The only gripe I have is they wouldn't take out a cabinet for me. Yup, pretty minor.

Posted:  3 years, 6 months ago

View Topic:

Schneider, Roehle, and Werner

Roehl tells you the route to take and where to get fuel. Now I have veered off their route a few times and have never heard a word from them about it. Roehl also will run you most direct route. I seem to get a good variety of freeway and highway routes.

As far as hometime Roehl has some good options. I run the 7/4, 7/3 which I like. I can plan things months in advance because I know when I will be home. They also offer a 14/7 that I will switch to in the future. The downside to these options is you share the truck.

As far as equipment goes Roehl has great equipment. I think 2014's are being phased out because I only see 2015-16's and all our trailers (reefer is what I pull) are in great condition. We actually just bought a bunch of new ones and heard more will be purchased soon.

Posted:  3 years, 6 months ago

View Topic:

Roehl Training for new driver with CDL

Week 1 solo update:

So I decided to make a post after my first week solo since I experienced some things that might help others.

Wednesday I got my truck at 1500. It was a 2016 International with 98,000 miles. It does have a front facing camera but not a driver facing. It is also the auto shift 10 speed. Not a fan of this 99% of the time, but sitting in Chicago traffic it comes in handy.

The truck is a single bunk and had plenty of cabinets. I actually asked maintaince to remove one of them so I could put my iceless cooler in that location but was told they can't. Not a huge deal.

Because I got my truck so late in the day I couldn't get a load out that night so I drove home to sleep in my own bed that night. I am on the 7/4, 7/3 schedule. So we launch on Wednesdays and Saturdays.

Thursday morning around 9am I get a preplan to run a preloaded trailer that was already at the terminal to a consignee that was 9 miles away. Roads were real icy so I was kinda happy to have a short run to start so I could get a feel for the auto. Well here is where things go wrong.

While with my trainer his truck pc would stay on all the time. So I would pull up directions and leave them on the screen so I could follow the route. When I got in my truck I automatically assumed it would be the same. NOPE, the directions turn off when moving. Ended up missing my turn and having to do a 20 mile detour in crap weather to get turned around.

Still made it on time and got unloaded.

Next run was to get loaded 11 miles away and deliver outside Chicago the next day.

Here is where I am still having issues.

I can't help but push myself to get as many miles a day as possible. I usually run my clock down to nothing. This gets me to my appointments super early. Now every place I have been takes me early. Usually I am back out on the road off to another location way before my appointment time arrives.

So fast forward a few days. I am scheduled to deliver a load in Indianapolis, IN at 1430. I arrive 30 miles north of Indy the night before around 1730 and have enough time to get to the location yet tonight to unload. Well I decide to call them and see how early I can show up. The guy answers the phone and says "anytime after midnight". So I park and go on break. I get up around 0200 and arrive to consignee at 0330. The guy at window turns me away. I explain that I called and was told anytime after midnight but he wouldn't hear it. He then tells me "come back after 9" so I head back to the truck stop 30 miles away. I probably could have found a closer truck stop but being the hour it was I didn't wanna spend all morning trying to find parking.

Before heading back at 0900 I decide to call. Well took an hour to get someone to answer and the guy tells me I can't check in over the phone. I explain that I already drove the 30 miles there once today and didn't wanna waste anymore of my time and he tells me "not before 1200". So at 1100 I head back. I arrive and he tells me to park out of the way and they would call me when ready. Wait, you had parking on site? Why didn't he tell me that this morning? This was a sad lesson for me because by the time I got unloaded, headed the 45 minutes away to get my next load (thankfully drop and hook) I had 45 minutes left to find a place to park before I ran out of hours. Ended up getting parked with 14 minutes to spare.

I also left a lock on a trailer on my 3rd run. That is a $48 mistake. Not happy since basically that run was now free.

Another thing that I learned during this week.

While I really liked my trainer I realized he did not do me any favors by telling me when to stop when sliding tandoms, or ground guiding on backing. The first time I had to adjust tandoms it was a nightmare because while I knew how to slide them I had no idea how many holes I should be adjusting them. So my first time at a scale I ended up reweighing 8 times before I was happy with the load.

Luckily for me backing has always been my strong suite and besides one back (the drop and hook with an expiring clock) where I was under huge pressure I have not had any issues backing at all.

My suggestion is when you go out with your trainer make them let you do everything without help. Make them let you send all the macros. Make them let you get out and check hole placement on tandoms, make them let you make your own corrections when backing. However you plan to monitor your route make sure they let you do it from the start. My trainer used a Rand McNally GPS but knew the routes from running them so much so he would usually just tell me "turn here" and when I got out on my own I had to come up with my own system since the screen turns off when driving.

For me I like using post it notes with each turn on them. The copilot system helps but is not always accurate.

Adjusting to the truck turning on and off while I sleep is a challenge as well.

Posted:  3 years, 6 months ago

View Topic:

48,000 lb load of respect for flatbed drivers and more

Hang in there Tyler!

It's hard on Mom, Dad, children, and even pets sometimes.

Being in military the family is used to me being gone. But our two little dogs have never been apart from me. Now the one who is more attached to me sits by the door every night waiting for me to walk in.

Hate to say it but it's harder being away from the dogs than the family.

Posted:  3 years, 6 months ago

View Topic:

Steer tires

Got pulled into a weigh station today in Illinois and he waved me through so that 100 pounds must be ok. Since the majority of my runs are through Wisconsin, Illinois, and Indiana I think I am ok.

Posted:  3 years, 6 months ago

View Topic:

Steer tires

Thanks everyone.

I head in on Tuesday and will talk to the shop about it then.

I have been green lighted through weight stations so far so figured they must allow a tolerance.

Physics obviously wasn't my strong suit since I figured the more weight i put on my drive tires would mean less on my steer and trailer tires.

Posted:  3 years, 6 months ago

View Topic:

Steer tires

I will check the tires in morning. I am willing to bet they are similar to yours since I get the green light from FM every time I let her know weight is over.

5th wheel is not adjustable but plan to talk to maintaince when I get back to yard about it.

Posted:  3 years, 6 months ago

View Topic:

Steer tires

Both with full tanks.

Posted:  3 years, 6 months ago

View Topic:

Steer tires

Fuel is full now but have weighed at various fuel levels and it don't matter.

Vehicle is a 2016 International.

Last load was:

Steer- 12,040 Drive- 28,940 Trailer- 28,875

Today

Steer- 12,100 Drive- 29,180 Trailer- 24,460

That last load was the lowest my steer have ever been. Usually they are between 12,100 and 12,180

Posted:  3 years, 6 months ago

View Topic:

Steer tires

My steer tires are always over weight.

When with my trainer we never had this issue.

I have read that steer tires are effected by 5th wheel placement. I have slid my tandoms all over the place but steer tires always read 12,100.

Posted:  3 years, 6 months ago

View Topic:

Sent home over Depression

double-quotes-start.png

Just like joining the military. You answer NO to everything.

Hope Werner works out for you.

double-quotes-end.png

So you're telling him to lie? If you lie, and they request your past medical info, then you lose credibility and you're done.

No I am not telling him to lie. He already went through the process.

Like myself, he was in the military and when you join they tell you to answer no to everything or else it slows down your enlistment and causes problems.

I guess you have to go through it to "get it."

Posted:  3 years, 6 months ago

View Topic:

First week solo....oh boy!

So got my truck Wednesday night and my first load Thursday morning.

Roads were garbage. My truck computer is not usable when driving so having directions to shipper on the screen like I did with trainer wouldn't work. Ended up missing a turn and having to do 20 miles to a safe place to turn around. Not a good start.

Second stop, over weight on steers no matter what I did. Kept going over 34,000 on either drive or trailer. Couldn't get a balance. 6 weight tickets later had the drive/trailer legal but steer were still 400 over. FM said take the load back for adjustment. Get back to shipper and she sends a message saying to Just deliver load as is. Hours wasted.

Auto-start in the truck is preventing sleep. Basically sit up waiting for my 10 hour to end so I can just drive.

Deliver my load at 6am and next pick up is scheduled for 1630 and us less than 2 hours away. Head straight there and get in and out before 1300.

Deliver the load and shoot across the State only to realize I left my lock on last trailer. Oops. That was an expensive mistake. Last load was now a freebee.

Delivery was scheduled for 0800 tomorrow but FM changed appointment time to 1400 because she said there was no way to make it on time. Here I sit 20 miles from consignee and could deliver as early as 0500 if I am awake. Next pick up is preloaded trailer about 45 minutes from current drop.

Even with the things going wrong I am having a blast. I just can't afford to forget anymore locks.

Posted:  3 years, 6 months ago

View Topic:

Sent home over Depression

Just like joining the military. You answer NO to everything.

Hope Werner works out for you.

Posted:  3 years, 6 months ago

View Topic:

To start with Roehl or Prime?

Not sure where you heard Roehl has older equipment?

They put me in a 2016 right out of training.

Less than 90,000 miles and still has the new truck smell.

Posted:  3 years, 7 months ago

View Topic:

Roehl Training for new driver with CDL

In your situation I would suggest getting your trainers phone number and talking to him in advance.

I know in the truck I was in a fridge would not fit. But strapping a cooler to the catwalk would of worked great.

Posted:  3 years, 7 months ago

View Topic:

My trainer is exhibiting some really bizarre behavior at a dysfunctional company.

I must admit, your story reminds me of this family I knew that owned a gentlemens club as a family business.

The 1 brother was a bouncer, the other brother was the bartender. The sister danced and the bartenders wife danced. It was a train wreck.

But if you think you will fit in then I would get through training and keep on trucking. It's all experience that will help you in the future.

Now if your trainer starts asking for your urine to keep him warm I would re-evaluate.

Good luck.

Posted:  3 years, 7 months ago

View Topic:

Roehl Training for new driver with CDL

Well this morning I tested out for going solo.

Testing out consisted of a road test, a truck stop pull through, and backing between 2 trailers at a 45° angle.

They didn't have any trucks ready for me today so hopefully they will have one ready on Wednesday which is my scheduled launch day.

This will be my last entry for awhile. I am now on what is called phase 3 of training which is basically running solo but having a FM who is supposed to hold my hand I guess.

I will post again when I am done with phase 3 or sooner if I have something worth reporting that could be beneficial.

Posted:  3 years, 7 months ago

View Topic:

Roehl Training for new driver with CDL

A summary of my time on the road with a trainer.

My biggest fear when I started down the road of becoming a truck driver was the time spent with a trainer. I have spent a lot of time on the road travelling and I have seen many of the stereotypical truckers at truck stops across the Country. The idea of sharing a small space with a big stinky truck driver who ****es in an empty soda bottle while I am asleep in my bunk really bothered me. It bothered me so much that the amount of time with a trainer was a major factor in the company I chose.

So after I finished orientation I got a call from my FM telling me who my trainer was and when/where to meet them. When I got home I immediately looked them up on Facebook. I was so happy to see they were not 800 pounds.

The first morning I sat in the drivers lounge waiting for them to arrive. He showed up on the phone with his FM trying to track down a empty trailer so no words were exchanged. We walked out to the truck and I breathed a sigh of relief when his truck didn't stink and was pretty clean.

With all this I felt pretty good going into training on day 1.

I already gave a pretty good recap of how my days went so I am not gonna go through day by day again, instead I will go into more of the behind the scenes life with a trainer.

I had read many posts about trainees bringing way to much stuff with them on the road. So I knew I didn't want to be one of those guys. I purchased 2 bags for the road. Bag 1 was a medium duffel bag that held all my clothes, extra gloves, and my power cords and headphones. Bag 2 was a backpack that held all my shower and personal hygene items. I had 1 sleeping bag and 1 small travel pillow. I brought 1 jacket and 1 insulated flannel shirt. I wore work boots but had a pair of tennis shoes in my duffel bag (that I never wore). My trainer provided me with 1 cabinet to store my stuff but I ended up putting all my food in the cabinet and left my bags on the end of the bed. I am 6'2" and could lay flat with the bags barely in the way.

My trainer said he don't eat in the truck when training so we stopped at truck stops for meals. I ended up eating most of my meals with him (felt guilty eating my food while he is sitting inside) and I did not bring enough money. My trainer loves the buffets and while I tried to avoid them the menu items are not really much cheaper. On a side note: If you are not used to eating out like that already I highly suggest bringing some pepto or something similar. Very thankful I did. On a few occasions my stomach was in knots from the food and I found myself eating pepto chewables like candy and drinking a ton of sprite to combat the pain.

My trainer loved to talk politics and he was able to find a political discussion in anything he saw. Personally I hate politics and enjoy listening to music and keeping the chit chat to a minimum. I found it easiest to just say "yup" or "nope" in agreeance to whatever he was saying to get it out of the air asap. Now in no way am I saying that I was miserable because he always wanted to talk politics, in all my trainer was a very nice guy and I was getting along with him very well. For the most part I don't partake in much small talk and can enjoy hours of silence so being in the truck and having someone wanna talk a lot was an adjustment.

I did almost all the driving. The trainer drove from the time he picked me up to our first pick up (about 30 minutes from terminal) and then I took over and drove all the miles except when I was out of hours. They wanted me to drive at least 300 miles a day and I usually had over 500. Now my trainer did say that I drove more than any other trainee he has had in the past. On a few occasions he asked if I wanted him to drive through Chicago and I would laugh and ask why? Apparently most students are afraid of Chicago and had him drive through it.

The biggest gripe I have of my trainer is that he would always tell me what lane to be in. Usually way before the sign was there. I know that sounds pretty minor but that was my biggest gripe. So I guess that shows how good my trainer really was.

For some reason when I went out with my trainer I started having some problems downshifting. I never had a problem down shifting in school or during orientation so no idea what caused it. I blame it on the truck. All my training was done on an International and my trainer had a Freightliner. But it only took a little Chicago rushhour traffic to give me all the shifting practice I needed.

On a side note: You have no idea how bad people drive but after a week in a semi you will have an eye opening experience. Also realize that a lot of people driving truck can not keep their truck inside the lines to save their life. So when being passed or passing pay extra attention to the other truck. I couldn't count how many times a truck passing me would cut into my lane forcing me on the shoulder.

When you are out with your trainer be vocal with them. If you feel your struggling with something or feel you need a little more practice on something tell them. Or if you are unsure why something is done a certain way question it.

Your trainer is your last stop before going solo. Take the time to do everything yourself. Do the check ins, do the fueling, do the macros, do the driving. I couldn't believe all the stories my trainer told me about previous students who wouldn't do check ins or macros.

Page 2 of 6

Previous Page
Next Page
Go To Page:    

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More