Profile For 9Ether

9Ether's Info

  • Location:
    Chesapeake, VA

  • Driving Status:
    Experienced Driver

  • Social Link:

  • Joined Us:
    5 years, 7 months ago

9Ether's Bio

No Bio Information Was Filled Out. Must be a secret.

Page 1 of 2

Next Page
Go To Page:    

Posted:  5 years ago

View Topic:

Western Express Flatbed NE Regional

I've been on this account for 8 months now. Realistically speaking, most of your loads will not be pretarped USG drywall loads, you'll only pull those loads of you happen to be in the vicinity of a USG plant. They will indeed be poorly tarped/strapped, however, all the other companies tarps are perfectly tarped/strapped. I inquired about this with the USG guys, they hate western express lol....Those loads are super heavy, and aren't going anywhere, even while undertightened, unless you drive like a fool.

You will hardly ever make that 1500 miles a week, or 5 loads. You'll make 4 loads, but to get you home, that 5 load you'll take home and deliver on Monday so it won't be on the next weeks check. When you get close to 1500 miles, they'll slow you down, as to not have to start giving you 51 cent a mile. You really really have to get in good with your DM to make your minimum.

My DM got fired along with a few others that had a pool of names of drivers they didn't care for, in which they had an ongoing bet to see how quickly they can make those drivers quit. The flip side to this, is if you don't complain, don't refuse loads, don't be late on delivery, never ever call him unless the Qualcomm is down, and start the days the very second your clock resets; you'll soon be a top priority and consistently make your minimum and on occasion a little over.

I opted to do the above and grin and bare, and bust ass and it's ok, but definitely not where you want to stay long term if you know you're worth. Starting out expect checks between 600-750 a week. Once you're in a groove, about 850. If you have a DM with integrity, about 950.

Do not...I repeat, do not, come out the gate questioning your DM, or being a high maintenance driver. You're going to get very little sleep, especially when hauling dryway to HD's as that appt is between 1am-4am. You're going to miss meals and showers, you're going to run out of time and not be able to make it home on Friday and your Monday appt will be at 6am while you live 6 hours away so you'll have to leave Sunday evening. It's no cakewalk but it builds character and toughens your skin. Learn northeast traffic patterns, don't be afraid to sleep at the consignee, don't hang at truck stops any longer than necessary, pack your truck with snacks. If your DM asks for a favor IE recovering a trailer, DO IT!

This isn't a rant, just an honest 1st person CURRENT perspective. I came out the gate bustin ass regardless if I was ****ed or not, and you will be ****ed lol....You're a POS to a DM until you prove otherwise and your checks will reflect that, don't be discouraged. He will notice your hard work eventually. Once you meet your 6th month mark, go seek your worth. Other companies are averaging 2400 miles a week in the northeast, getting paid for empty miles, and respect their drivers.

Posted:  5 years, 3 months ago

View Topic:

Prime tanker division

I was wondering if we had any prime drivers from the tanker division in the northeast region here:

I'd like a little insight if so. I'm curious of approximate weekly miles, they say home weekly (is that weekends or whenever), are you consitanrlt taking home 1000+ weekly after taxes? Are you happy in general? Thanks guys.

Posted:  5 years, 6 months ago

View Topic:

Northeast regional routes undesired why???

I'm actually a recent grad, starting orientation tomorrow for NE flatbed with WE. My preference is north east regional because I like to be well versed in everything I do, and what better time to do NE than with a trainer. I can't imagine EVER being on any JOB and tasked to do something and "I'm not comfortable" for ME that's unacceptable. Then again, im originally from NYC, im right at home when it comes to challenges, especially behind a wheel. How can you hone your skill if you just drive straight and flat all day is my logic.

Posted:  5 years, 6 months ago

View Topic:

Western Express NE regional flatbed

I talked to a WE driver recently. He said you start out at .36 cpm then bumped to .40 after a year. He was otr so idk how close that is to regional pay. Just some info I came across.

Thanks for sharing!

Posted:  5 years, 6 months ago

View Topic:

Western Express NE regional flatbed

I don't know what they are paying during training, but it has increased from when I was there. You really should try to have a little bit set aside just in case you need it during the training time - that's what I did, the training pay was ridiculously low when I went through it.

I'm sorry, I forgot to answer your question about the time frame to get a trainer. Here's what I did... I put in a request for a non-smoking trainer, but also stated that I would accept a smoker if there was not a non-smoker available. Here's what happened: I got a trainer on the first day after orientation. He did smoke, but not all that much. I just wanted to get started, and was willing to do whatever it took to get that ball rolling. Look, trucks have windows, and as much as I don't like cigarette smoke, I just figured I could roll down the window and get through it.

You have to realize that training is temporary, and you will have to keep that foremost in your mind. My trainer could have been clearly described as a PITA, but every time I was tempted to quit because of his ways, I would just assure myself that this was temporary, and I am going to prove to them ,and to myself, that I can handle whatever comes my way to get this done.

Awesome. Thanks a lot old school, you've been great. I intend to get there and take the crooked with the straights. Seems going with the right mindset is key.

Posted:  5 years, 6 months ago

View Topic:

Western Express NE regional flatbed

double-quotes-start.png

Here we offer encouragement. At the same time we pull no punches. We put the drivers feet to the fire first, lol. We tell it like it is. All of that Glassdoor and Truckers Report whining don't fly in here. People have tried, they usually get upset when everything they say is dissected, analyzed, then shot full of holes.

Anyways, Old School is the man to talk to about Western Express. I personally don't know much about them other than they are based out of Nashville, TN.

double-quotes-end.png

Good! Sounds like my type of forum!

Also, I know it's been a while since you were hired with them but do you know their current weekly training salary?

Posted:  5 years, 6 months ago

View Topic:

Western Express NE regional flatbed

9Ether, I was very successful at Western Express. Don't let all those negative comments from drivers bother you. Some things never change, and whining, complaining truck drivers is one of those dynamics that seems to be a self fulfilling prophecy. I ran over the road flat-bed for them and as long as I was doing my part, they kept me running just as much as I possibly could. In trucking you are the critical component to your success. It is not the company you work for. They are doing everything they can to make money and be profitable, and one of the big parts of that puzzle is having drivers who understand that they need to be safe productive top performers.

I can't answer your questions about exactly which states that regional run involves, but I did know some drivers who ran in that program and they seemed to do well, and enjoyed the fact that their minimum pay was guaranteed. It doesn't mean going home Friday, and leave out Monday morning. Here's what it means, and this is critical to your success. It means that you learn how to manage things on this account so that you are getting the most accomplished - remember this whole industry is based on performance, and that means moving the most freight safely and efficiently. You are going to want to make sure that you go home on Friday under a load, so that you can deliver it Monday morning. Now, that may mean that you work late Friday night, or even stay out until Saturday morning so that you can get loaded before you go home. You may have to leave Sunday afternoon so that you can get to your consignee and sleep there so that you can get unloaded first thing Monday morning. That is not going to happen every week, but I am showing you how you do this stuff so that you are efficient and productive.

Do not expect to just get by and count on that minimum pay coming your way each week. They expect you to earn more than the minimum pay. If you are continually receiving the minimum pay, you are proving to be an under achiever and you will not last long on that account. The point of offering the minimum pay is to provide a cushion for the driver just in case the business from the customers they are serving in that region falls off for a week or two, which occasionally may happen. The customers have contracted with the carrier so that they will have drivers available when needed. It is a bit of a give and take on each parties side of the deal. The driver will benefit if it slows down a little, and he is expected to really "hump it" during those times that freight is heavy.

This was really informative and encouraging, as I like to be the best at what I do whatever it is I do. I'll definitely be trying to run as hard as possible and even through some weekends for an extra buck and in hopes to become a "fonto guy" to my DM. I'm going to put my best foot forward and hit the ground running.

Does is typically take long to get into a trucknwith a trainer after load securement training?

Posted:  5 years, 6 months ago

View Topic:

Western Express NE regional flatbed

Here we offer encouragement. At the same time we pull no punches. We put the drivers feet to the fire first, lol. We tell it like it is. All of that Glassdoor and Truckers Report whining don't fly in here. People have tried, they usually get upset when everything they say is dissected, analyzed, then shot full of holes.

Anyways, Old School is the man to talk to about Western Express. I personally don't know much about them other than they are based out of Nashville, TN.

Good! Sounds like my type of forum!

Posted:  5 years, 6 months ago

View Topic:

Western Express NE regional flatbed

You really don't need to worry about hearing the company sucks here. I believe Old School started with Western and was quite happy with them.

Ok cool. Those guys over at truckers-report.com are horrible.

Posted:  5 years, 6 months ago

View Topic:

Western Express NE regional flatbed

hey guys,

I've done my research and All the posts are old and I hear a lot has changed. Also, I'm aware what the recruiter told me but I'd love some info from recent/current employees who know a thing or two about their northeast regional flatbed division, as they lie to get you there.

1.) I'm curious as to how many states in the NE regional does flatbed service if not all of them, which states does it frequent more than others... 2.) What are realistic miles per week for ne regional, all I was told was $900 minimum a week. 3.) They say home weekends, and it's "priority" for ne flatbed drivers. Does that mean home Friday and out Monday morning? Or home Friday evening and out Sunday? 4.) How long would I be waiting for a trainer after orientation in flatbed as a non smoker?

Thanks in advance. (Please don't tell me how much the company sucks, I'm a recent grad with a 15 over. I'm simply curious of the questions I've asked).

Posted:  5 years, 6 months ago

View Topic:

Gyms in major truck stops?

This is unfortunate, I guess I'll throw some resistance bands in the truck or something.

Posted:  5 years, 6 months ago

View Topic:

Gyms in major truck stops?

Just curious, while in cdl training, some of the instructors were saying how truck stops have gyms for weight training. Is this few and far in between or a common thing?

Posted:  5 years, 7 months ago

View Topic:

Experience question

Great info guys. Much much appreciated. Reason I want to pursue tankers is because I come from a tanker background (jet fuel and liquid oxygen/nitrogen), though the largest amount on a tractor trailer was 12-15k being prior Air Force (flightline refueling and cryo production). I'm not ENTIRELY new to it, I've only dealt in hazmat and the tanks always had baffles for front to rear slosh, however, overturning one from turning to fast was still very easy to do. Not sure if food grade tankers have baffled AT ALL.

I'd hate to give off the impression of a know it all, surely I don't, but I'm not all the way green in tankers haha. For the past 12 years I've been moving hazmat via vehicle, pipeline, and tank transfers. Just not in the capacity of "commercial driving". For that, as much as I 'think' I know, I know I have wayyyyyy MORE to learn to be seasoned on the road.

Posted:  5 years, 7 months ago

View Topic:

Experience question

Oh, forgot to answer the "experience" question.

Most of the time a company will only count certain types of jobs as "driving experience" and it's normally the same type of job they're hiring for.

Hiring For OTR or Regional Work

If a company is looking for OTR or Regional drivers then they normally want drivers with experience running Interstate (from state to state) as opposed to Intrastate (staying within your home state). The lifestyle of running Interstate (OTR or regional) is quite a bit different than it is for people who get home every night so they want people that know what they're getting into.

Hiring For Local Class A Work

If a company is hiring for a local Class A 18 wheeler job they will normally count any 18 Wheeler Class A experience as driving experience. I specify "18 Wheeler" because there are Class A straight trucks that companies often will not count as experience because you're not in an combination vehicle (one that bends in the middle). I've driven Class A dump trucks in the past where we could gross 72,000 with 12 wheels (the standard 10 plus a two wheel helper axle).

So the bottom line is you want to get experience in the type of truck you'll be driving doing the types of routes you'll be running for it to count as experience in the eyes of future companies.

If you're really smart you'll explore every possible opportunity with the company you're at before moving on to another one. Remember, you're starting over at the bottom in trucking when you change companies. You're going to have to prove yourself all over again before the new company is going to trust you with their best freight or put you in their best equipment.

If you can find a better opportunity at the company you're already working for it's a huge advantage because you keep all of your seniority with the company and you know some important people already. So why not try to move up the ladder starting from the middle instead of changing companies and starting over from the bottom again, right?

Good stuff, makes perfect sense! Thanks a ton for taking the time to reply in depth. Let me ask you, my ultimate goal is to pull tankers locally or regionally; to gain the experience to do so would you recommend staying at my starter company for a few years or transitioning over to a tanker company 6-12 months in?

better yet, know of any starter tanker companies other than prime and Schneider bulk?

Posted:  5 years, 7 months ago

View Topic:

Western express flatbed

Look at for Old School's posts. He started with them and now works for Knight.

thanks bro. he's just the man i need to see then, as im contemplating between W/E flatbed and Knight to do my first year.

Posted:  5 years, 7 months ago

View Topic:

Western express flatbed

Anyone currently running western express flatbed division (north east)? Id love to hear how its been treating you, your total experience in general.

Posted:  5 years, 7 months ago

View Topic:

Experience question

Regional is very much like OTR. If your doing CDL-A driving, then it's experience.

Yes, many local companies don't have the resources to train newbies, so they look for experience in their new hires.

Ok cool! Thanks for the response.

Posted:  5 years, 7 months ago

View Topic:

Experience question

Are regional as useful as useful as local miles when it comes to applying to better companies down the road? Seems most local companies require at least a year or 2 of otr experience, but does regional experience count for anything?

Posted:  5 years, 7 months ago

View Topic:

Looking For A Little Insight On Choosing A Trucking Company

Oh I did forget to mention that a prehire is simply an "invite to the party". Always keep in mind that orientation is a really long interview. Glad you got lots if prehires. I can tell you my daughter only had 1 such ticket, and she ended up with only 2 choices, so decided to wait till everything drops off.

Ohhh ok I see. Yea I learned that while I was still in cdl school, so what I started doing is calling them and asking before I submit an app "will I be hireable with these 2 tickets". I'm not looking to shoot up to the top of the echelon out the gate, just a decent "starter" to get my years worth of "feet wet" and time for the tickets to drop. I'd sure hate to wait, then when the time comes I have no tickets but no experience as well. A year or 2 of experience and no tickets seems to knock out 2 birds with one stone.

Posted:  5 years, 7 months ago

View Topic:

Looking For A Little Insight On Choosing A Trucking Company

Those wreckless driving tickets will certainly hurt. I recommend applying anywhere and everywhere, hoping youll get an offer and be willing to tske what you're offered and stay there until you have a clean driving record. I don't believe you will have the luxury of being choosy.

Best of luck!

Yea I made that bed, I'm going to lie in it. I've filled out at least 20 apps, I'd say about 5 said he'll no (they aren't know to be starter companies in the first place), 5 said they'll hire me in 3 weeks when one falls off, and the remaining 5 gave me offers. From the companies I've been applying to, the biggest thing is either waiting until one falls off in 3 weeks or waiting until the other is older than a year in may. I just don't want to sit around at all waiting, I'm super anxious to start, and well, the bills will still be due lol

Page 1 of 2

Next Page
Go To Page:    

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More