Western Express NE Regional Flatbed

Topic 18017 | Page 1

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9Ether's Comment
member avatar

hey guys,

I've done my research and All the posts are old and I hear a lot has changed. Also, I'm aware what the recruiter told me but I'd love some info from recent/current employees who know a thing or two about their northeast regional flatbed division, as they lie to get you there.

1.) I'm curious as to how many states in the NE regional does flatbed service if not all of them, which states does it frequent more than others... 2.) What are realistic miles per week for ne regional, all I was told was $900 minimum a week. 3.) They say home weekends, and it's "priority" for ne flatbed drivers. Does that mean home Friday and out Monday morning? Or home Friday evening and out Sunday? 4.) How long would I be waiting for a trainer after orientation in flatbed as a non smoker?

Thanks in advance. (Please don't tell me how much the company sucks, I'm a recent grad with a 15 over. I'm simply curious of the questions I've asked).

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Cwc's Comment
member avatar

You really don't need to worry about hearing the company sucks here. I believe Old School started with Western and was quite happy with them.

9Ether's Comment
member avatar

You really don't need to worry about hearing the company sucks here. I believe Old School started with Western and was quite happy with them.

Ok cool. Those guys over at truckers-report.com are horrible.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Welcome 9Ether.

There is a search bar in the upper left hand, top corner of this page. Type the words Old School Western Express and press enter (press search if on an iPhone), the website will return all of the archives matching those words.

Good luck.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
LDRSHIP's Comment
member avatar

Here we offer encouragement. At the same time we pull no punches. We put the drivers feet to the fire first, lol. We tell it like it is. All of that Glassdoor and Truckers Report whining don't fly in here. People have tried, they usually get upset when everything they say is dissected, analyzed, then shot full of holes.

Anyways, Old School is the man to talk to about Western Express. I personally don't know much about them other than they are based out of Nashville, TN.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

9Ether, I was very successful at Western Express. Don't let all those negative comments from drivers bother you. Some things never change, and whining, complaining truck drivers is one of those dynamics that seems to be a self fulfilling prophecy. I ran over the road flat-bed for them and as long as I was doing my part, they kept me running just as much as I possibly could. In trucking you are the critical component to your success. It is not the company you work for. They are doing everything they can to make money and be profitable, and one of the big parts of that puzzle is having drivers who understand that they need to be safe productive top performers.

I can't answer your questions about exactly which states that regional run involves, but I did know some drivers who ran in that program and they seemed to do well, and enjoyed the fact that their minimum pay was guaranteed. It doesn't mean going home Friday, and leave out Monday morning. Here's what it means, and this is critical to your success. It means that you learn how to manage things on this account so that you are getting the most accomplished - remember this whole industry is based on performance, and that means moving the most freight safely and efficiently. You are going to want to make sure that you go home on Friday under a load, so that you can deliver it Monday morning. Now, that may mean that you work late Friday night, or even stay out until Saturday morning so that you can get loaded before you go home. You may have to leave Sunday afternoon so that you can get to your consignee and sleep there so that you can get unloaded first thing Monday morning. That is not going to happen every week, but I am showing you how you do this stuff so that you are efficient and productive.

Do not expect to just get by and count on that minimum pay coming your way each week. They expect you to earn more than the minimum pay. If you are continually receiving the minimum pay, you are proving to be an under achiever and you will not last long on that account. The point of offering the minimum pay is to provide a cushion for the driver just in case the business from the customers they are serving in that region falls off for a week or two, which occasionally may happen. The customers have contracted with the carrier so that they will have drivers available when needed. It is a bit of a give and take on each parties side of the deal. The driver will benefit if it slows down a little, and he is expected to really "hump it" during those times that freight is heavy.

Consignee:

The customer the freight is being delivered to. Also referred to as "the receiver". The shipper is the customer that is shipping the goods, the consignee is the customer receiving the goods.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

9Ether's Comment
member avatar

Here we offer encouragement. At the same time we pull no punches. We put the drivers feet to the fire first, lol. We tell it like it is. All of that Glassdoor and Truckers Report whining don't fly in here. People have tried, they usually get upset when everything they say is dissected, analyzed, then shot full of holes.

Anyways, Old School is the man to talk to about Western Express. I personally don't know much about them other than they are based out of Nashville, TN.

Good! Sounds like my type of forum!

9Ether's Comment
member avatar

9Ether, I was very successful at Western Express. Don't let all those negative comments from drivers bother you. Some things never change, and whining, complaining truck drivers is one of those dynamics that seems to be a self fulfilling prophecy. I ran over the road flat-bed for them and as long as I was doing my part, they kept me running just as much as I possibly could. In trucking you are the critical component to your success. It is not the company you work for. They are doing everything they can to make money and be profitable, and one of the big parts of that puzzle is having drivers who understand that they need to be safe productive top performers.

I can't answer your questions about exactly which states that regional run involves, but I did know some drivers who ran in that program and they seemed to do well, and enjoyed the fact that their minimum pay was guaranteed. It doesn't mean going home Friday, and leave out Monday morning. Here's what it means, and this is critical to your success. It means that you learn how to manage things on this account so that you are getting the most accomplished - remember this whole industry is based on performance, and that means moving the most freight safely and efficiently. You are going to want to make sure that you go home on Friday under a load, so that you can deliver it Monday morning. Now, that may mean that you work late Friday night, or even stay out until Saturday morning so that you can get loaded before you go home. You may have to leave Sunday afternoon so that you can get to your consignee and sleep there so that you can get unloaded first thing Monday morning. That is not going to happen every week, but I am showing you how you do this stuff so that you are efficient and productive.

Do not expect to just get by and count on that minimum pay coming your way each week. They expect you to earn more than the minimum pay. If you are continually receiving the minimum pay, you are proving to be an under achiever and you will not last long on that account. The point of offering the minimum pay is to provide a cushion for the driver just in case the business from the customers they are serving in that region falls off for a week or two, which occasionally may happen. The customers have contracted with the carrier so that they will have drivers available when needed. It is a bit of a give and take on each parties side of the deal. The driver will benefit if it slows down a little, and he is expected to really "hump it" during those times that freight is heavy.

This was really informative and encouraging, as I like to be the best at what I do whatever it is I do. I'll definitely be trying to run as hard as possible and even through some weekends for an extra buck and in hopes to become a "fonto guy" to my DM. I'm going to put my best foot forward and hit the ground running.

Does is typically take long to get into a trucknwith a trainer after load securement training?

Consignee:

The customer the freight is being delivered to. Also referred to as "the receiver". The shipper is the customer that is shipping the goods, the consignee is the customer receiving the goods.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

9Ether's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Here we offer encouragement. At the same time we pull no punches. We put the drivers feet to the fire first, lol. We tell it like it is. All of that Glassdoor and Truckers Report whining don't fly in here. People have tried, they usually get upset when everything they say is dissected, analyzed, then shot full of holes.

Anyways, Old School is the man to talk to about Western Express. I personally don't know much about them other than they are based out of Nashville, TN.

double-quotes-end.png

Good! Sounds like my type of forum!

Also, I know it's been a while since you were hired with them but do you know their current weekly training salary?

Old School's Comment
member avatar

I don't know what they are paying during training, but it has increased from when I was there. You really should try to have a little bit set aside just in case you need it during the training time - that's what I did, the training pay was ridiculously low when I went through it.

I'm sorry, I forgot to answer your question about the time frame to get a trainer. Here's what I did... I put in a request for a non-smoking trainer, but also stated that I would accept a smoker if there was not a non-smoker available. Here's what happened: I got a trainer on the first day after orientation. He did smoke, but not all that much. I just wanted to get started, and was willing to do whatever it took to get that ball rolling. Look, trucks have windows, and as much as I don't like cigarette smoke, I just figured I could roll down the window and get through it.

You have to realize that training is temporary, and you will have to keep that foremost in your mind. My trainer could have been clearly described as a PITA, but every time I was tempted to quit because of his ways, I would just assure myself that this was temporary, and I am going to prove to them ,and to myself, that I can handle whatever comes my way to get this done.

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