Northeast Regional Routes Undesired Why???

Topic 18024 | Page 1

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Jeremy's Comment
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I hear it all the time your a rookie running solo northeast regional goodluck with that! I was born and raised in upstate ny i love it hear i cant imagine driving anywhere else.Company is in love with me im a worker and have been pushing my single trips further and further im sittin in nc right now.im just curious is it because of any particular reason like the cold or occasional weather?j/w id say my biggest gripe is heavy loads on the mountains but its trucking i love a challenge. Thanks Jeremy from ny

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Errol V.'s Comment
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Jeremy, you grew up in a congested area, so for you it's not so bad. I grew up, learned to drive and lived in the Los Angeles area, with all the traffic there. So when now I drive through Atlanta, which many people try to avoid, it's "So what?"

You could do a search here for NYC or northeast to see other comments. Do you realize many companies promise extra benefits for driving there? Everything from extra pay to making NYC trips optional.

Jeremy's Comment
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I rarely go to the city although i do hit every other major city in northeast Im giving this company time since they gave me opportunity

Jeremy's Comment
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I do gather though that being a worker and a runner with the proper amount of time/experience ill actually be a valuable asset to the right company

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
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Hi I'm from NJ so I think I can compare other areas to the NE. For one there is limited parking compared to other states. You might be lucky to park within 80 miles of your customer. The truck stops are smaller and older, made for shorter trailers, meaning accidents are more likely. Plus, even shutting down by 1600, you often fight for parking spaces with other drivers.,..and often have to wake drivers up just to pull out. Our buildings and landmarks are so much older...meaning many of our US and state roads are much narrower and don't have the intersection swing room that other places do. Our drivers are much more aggressive and we have more low clearances because many of the bridges are older. If you miss an exit, you usually wind up on a long winding road up and down hills with no turn around in sight. It is very easy to go 50 miles out of route this way. And...some drivers pay their own tolls. The NE has not only the most expensive tolls in the country but the most number of tolls. Because the buildings are older many of the customers have really tight areas or doors...not enough swing room cause they weren't meant for our longer trailers.

Then comes the weather. Our winter is much wetter than other places. We get freezing rain which turns to ice on the surface....but other places are always so cold it would be snow. They don't see much slush. They don't see the ice storms we do.

And as stated before...we are much more congested with traffic...most of the time. For me to make a pickup 40 miles away, it could literally take me 2 plus hours to get to the customer. When the snow hits..the smaller truck stops often don't plow or open. So you THINK you planned for a safe place to get to...and its closed and covered in a foot of snow. True story..happened on I 90...but I always have backup plans ;)

And as Errol stated...many companies will pay you more per mile. Prime has a NE dedicated route where you are guaranteed at least $1250 per week, regardless of how few miles you get. There are other routes there too that require a lightweight...so instead of 41.5 CPM for the condo, you get 46.5 CPM for the LW. But then get an additional 5 CPM for NE. So a newbie straight out of training can make 51.5 CPM.

.

Dedicated Route:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

9Ether's Comment
member avatar

I'm actually a recent grad, starting orientation tomorrow for NE flatbed with WE. My preference is north east regional because I like to be well versed in everything I do, and what better time to do NE than with a trainer. I can't imagine EVER being on any JOB and tasked to do something and "I'm not comfortable" for ME that's unacceptable. Then again, im originally from NYC, im right at home when it comes to challenges, especially behind a wheel. How can you hone your skill if you just drive straight and flat all day is my logic.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
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I'm actually a recent grad, starting orientation tomorrow for NE flatbed with WE. My preference is north east regional because I like to be well versed in everything I do, and what better time to do NE than with a trainer. I can't imagine EVER being on any JOB and tasked to do something and "I'm not comfortable" for ME that's unacceptable. Then again, im originally from NYC, im right at home when it comes to challenges, especially behind a wheel. How can you hone your skill if you just drive straight and flat all day is my logic.

That's true, but this is a learned skill and you do need to work up to levels. You won't learn to back in one day....or swing wide enough...and even after a year+. I get to customers and say how the heck am I supposed to get in there? Sure I do get in....but if I had those places in the beginning I'd have banged a bunch of trucks and buildings doing it.

It took me over an hour to get into one door...crossing the road and blocking traffic. Finally get in by jumping the curb and the guy says "ur the first 53 footer we've had in here". No crap dude.. I took a pic for my FM to show him in didn't hit the fence, utility pole or fire hydrant.

Of course...I drove and tested on flatbed and they are shorter and easier to back IMO.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Jeremy's Comment
member avatar

Well i might have to talk to prime im only getting .32cpm with accesorials although after being on my own for 3 months i dont have any interest in going out with a trainer I see your point things are tight at old warehouse weathers unpredictable tolls are high roads can be sketchy i guess thats all the norm for me though i can avoid alotta nonsense knowing my area well Thanks fir your pov though i guess if you werent born and raised here it could be a shocker

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

Pretty much. People are used to where they are used to. I hate going west. I have no desire to go to California. I know drivers who want the good weather and the miles. Screw that. In get plenty of miles. In winter they run me to ID, UT, MT, WY....but the rest of the year I'm east of Denver. I'm not crazy about FL either.

Jeremy's Comment
member avatar

Im enjoying myself bombin around the northeast i got to go to north carolina yesterday and i go to chicago i average 2500 miles a week which from what i understand is pretty good for a ne regional driver but def gonna keep my eyes open for the perfect position

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

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