Profile For Slowpoke

Slowpoke's Info

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  • Driving Status:
    Experienced Driver

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  • Joined Us:
    2 years ago

Slowpoke's Bio

Thirty Five Year Veteran of the transportation industry. Have done most jobs in the industry and about the only title I can not claim is trucking company owner. Experience is about a 50/50 split between driving and office work. Even though I am in the Safety Managers position now, I still get behind the wheel from time to time and for the most part enjoy that time immensely. I make no bones about the fact that this industry has been very good to me over the years (I guess after 35 years I had better be able to say that). I have from time to time found this website when researching information on the industry and found that it seems to be a fairly reasonable place to offer an opinion or advice from time to time. Started reading Brett's Book and found it to be something that ,so far at least, I can relate to and agree with about 90% of it. Should be noted the 10% is only different experiences from one person to another and none of that 10% will necessarily be identical to your personal experience. I intend on getting further through the Becoming a Driver book over the coming weeks.

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Posted:  1 year, 2 months ago

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Great news from FMCSA on PC

As for Swift, you might need to talk to Safety about the necessary move.

Not just Swift, all persons need to consult with their Motor Carriers before making any Personal Conveyance move and you must ensure you are relieved of duty by the Motor Carrier before attempting to apply the Personal Conveyance. Please find below a copy/paste from 2nd sentence of the FMCSA guidance link as supplied by Turtle;

"A driver may record time operating a CMV for personal conveyance as off-duty only when the driver is relieved from work and all responsibility for performing work by the motor carrier".

I am being somewhat direct about this as I have spent my day speaking with the "Truck Stop Lawyers division" of our Fleet who seemed to have skipped over that important point and I am fairly confident they are not the only ones who missed it. Further to this there seems to be tone in the Guidance provided (although not clearly stated as such) that the Motor Carrier is to be the one making the choice of where that first safe location is and direct the driver to that location. I have already queried the great minds at FMCSA on the last comment and will try to remember to update here when/if I get a response.....

Regards, Slowpoke

Posted:  1 year, 2 months ago

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Background Checks vs. The Matrix

I am sure there will be those that continue to try "beating the system" even when the Drug and Alcohol Clearing House is a requirement for carriers doing a pre-employment screen. There will always be at least one who thinks they are smarter than the system or that the system should not apply to them for whatever wild and crazy reason their mind recently concocted. Obviously there are things, such as a previous positive test that will preclude any carrier from hiring you until you have completed the Substance Abuse Program, but in many cases being honest and transparent will save heartache for everyone in the long run and may even net you consideration points with a potential employer because of your candor and understanding that you know this (whatever this negative is) is not a good thing in the transportation industry.

Slowpoke

Posted:  1 year, 3 months ago

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Merch?

Interesting thread, Merchandise, while a great idea, is a much trickier thing than many realize for a non profit such as this. 1st, you have to have a logo and unless you are a graphic designer or know someone who is, creating the logo can be an expensive undertaking. 2nd, most merchandise suppliers do not do one offs of items and will want a minimum order of 50, 100 or 250 units as a guaranteed purchase, and this in and of itself creates a myriad of problems, putting the money up for the initial product purchase, then keeping stock, then reselling which creates the need to keep an inventory list and then of course we can never forget the government that wants their tax dollars from the sale whereby you almost need to create a company to keep it separate from personal income. Again, a great idea that I wouldn't wish on anyone and having done it for two charity organizations in the past, have the records of it being a losing proposition even for those that started it out with the best intentions of it being a fund raiser.

Slowpoke

Posted:  1 year, 3 months ago

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Disappointed but Now Experienced and Rewarded

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.But to be successful you MUST find your FIT (what works for you) in order to be successful at it

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Great post. This right here says it all.

Indeed it does Daniel, I have often said not every driver is for every company and not every company is for every driver. It is the very reason that you will hear some say fantastic things about the company they work for while others have nothing but disdain for that very same company. Company 1 needs triangle shaped drivers to fit in their triangle shaped openings Company 2 needs square shaped drivers to fit in their square shaped openings, and Company 3 needs round shaped drivers to fit in their round shaped openings. With that said, their are those rare drivers who will be able to fit themselves into any shaped opening their carrier may need. On the other hand there are those who continuously try changing the shape of the opening that the carrier provided and find themselves frustrated that the carrier doesn't want to change the shape of that hole. Those that fit the opening provided by the carrier or those that fit themselves into an opening are usually fairly happy about their job or career choice, while those that continually beat and berate the hole shape they find themselves in are usually very upset with their job or career choice. If you do enough reading here, you will quickly see that most of the regular contributors find themselves as those that fit, or that fit themselves into the opening provided by the carrier, by contrast, in looking through other websites that have become little more than crying towel places, it is easy to see the other faction that never found the right place to fit.

Regards as always, Slowpoke

Posted:  1 year, 3 months ago

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Preventable accidents

To answer your question as simply as possible, YES every accident is preventable! However before I go any further I want to take a moment as to the difference between being involved in a preventable accident and being at fault for an accident and I guess we may as well go a step further and explain the being charged or issued a citation as a result of an accident. All three of these things are completely different terms in regards to an accident, unfortunately these terms seem to get used interchangeably and loosely as opposed to being hinged to solid definition. So let's first give some definition to them and then discuss how and why they are often misused with regards to the preventability of an accident.

1. Charged/Issued a Citation - Is only an indicator that at least one of the parties to the accident were in violation of a traffic law prior to, during or after the accident. This violation "MAY" have contributed to the accident, but is not necessarily a primary contributing factor. Law enforcement is at the scene of an accident for many reasons, but none of those reasons have to do with determining if an accident was preventable or not, they already know the answer to that question is yes. They are there to investigate and gather facts, and where that investigation or those facts reveal a violation of the law lay charges or issue citations as deemed appropriate. This is the reason that most defense lawyers will tell you to give only the required information at the scene of any accident, name, contact information, drivers licence, vehicle registration, insurance information. (Note I did not say statement or description of what happened, remember anything you offer voluntarily to a law enforcement officer is not covered by Miranda or Constitutional Rights, but this is a topic for a different thread)

2. At Fault/Not at Fault - This is an insurance term and must not be confused or interchanged for the words preventable or non-preventable (unfortunately this is often the case and why people seem to revolt about having been deemed to be in a preventable accident, but as you will see with the definition of preventable below this should not be the case). Fault is simply a determination of the percentage of responsibility an individual bears towards a situation. As an aside here, if you are deemed to be 50.01% responsible for an accident 100% of the fault, and therefore financial responsibility will rest with your insurer. Fault determination rules are different from state to state, but yes it is possible to be 49.99% responsible for an accident and be deemed by insurance as Not at Fault.

3. Preventable Accident - Is one in which the driver failed to exercise every reasonable precaution to prevent the accident. This is irrespective of whether or not there is property damage or personal injury, the extent of the loss of injury, to whom it occurred and the location of the accident. In order for a person to avoid being involved in a preventable accident, each driver should understand and practice the concept of defensive driving. “Defensive driving” is driving so as to prevent accidents in spite of the incorrect actions of others and adverse driving conditions; such as light, weather, road, traffic, vehicle condition and your physical and mental state.

So is every accident preventable? Yes. Is every accident preventable by your actions? The answer to that is only determined by the effort you put into being a defensive driver. Are you at fault for every preventable accident you may be involved in? No. Will you be charged or receive a traffic citation for every preventable accident you will be involved in? No.

Regards, Slowpoke

Posted:  1 year, 3 months ago

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Small companies..what to look for?

Chris, Again the membership of TT hits the nail on the head and gives you some very good advice, and I sincerely hope you have already closed that door and are waiting for the next door to open. I am certainly not against smaller carriers simply because they are small, and note that Chris absolutely did the right thing by asking questions and getting answers. Never be afraid to ask a company questions that help you in knowing that they establish a proper employee employer relationship. Be very wary of any company that does not wish to establish a proper employee employer relationship and ask yourself, if they are willing to play with fire when it comes to the IRS, how much more willing will they be to play with fire when it comes to other regulatory relationships? Further to that, how committed will they be to seeing you actually get paid for the work you do when they find themselves in cash flow problems? The answer is simple they wont care a bit, they will have closed the doors on the office in the name of ABC Logistics at 91b First Avenue and opened up their new office in the name of XYZ logistics at 91c First Ave. Oh and this will take place within minutes, however none of it will help you when you need fuel in Georgia to get your load to Ohio. No one will be answering phones because your company no longer exists and the former owners are way too busy calling the trade rags to place an advertisement for drivers at $0.60 per mile for the new XYZ logisics company....... Yep they really do this.......Beware. On a very sad note, I know far more people in this industry that have been burned by this type of operation than those people who actually considered themselves winners because of it. As a matter of fact I do not know anyone in the trucking industry who would say they came out better off for working in one of these "quasi-legal/illegal" plans.

Slowpoke

Posted:  1 year, 3 months ago

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What Does It Take To Be The Best?

It was stated before, and alluded to in a couple other posts here such as the most recent by G-Town;

Honesty - You cannot begin to fix a problem and improve yourself until you own that problem "Yep, I screwed up"

We live in a world where we are taught by those that lead us "it is always okay to blame the other guy", it is often times very hard to accept responsibility for our own actions. Okay so you hit a concrete block because you pulled ahead too far to straighten up in order to back into that parking spot, dock, etc....Please stop blaming the contractor who put it there 3 months ago for placing it three one hundredths of an inch to far to the west, please stop blaming the truck parked beside you for being parked a little crooked and forcing you to make a difficult maneuver, please stop telling me how many other drivers have hit it and how many thousands of them came up to you after you hit the concrete block and told you it shouldn't have been there. Just be honest and say "I Screwed Up." It really is the start of making yourself a better person, even if it does dent the pride a bit for the moment.

Sorry I haven't been around much lately, will try to get back on track. Slowpoke

Posted:  1 year, 5 months ago

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The Web Of Lies And Misinformation

Great article G-Town, You made an interesting point in finding a place on the web with integrity. All a person needs to do is spend a little time reading and absorbing some of the excellent information here to know that you wont find a lot of, if any, BS from the regular contributors here. You may not hear what you want to hear or in this case read what you were hoping to read, but it will indeed be the Trucking Truth!

Slowpoke

Posted:  1 year, 5 months ago

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Possible self driving/ autonomous trucks opinions and time frame?

The good news for all those drivers worried about being replaced by a robot is they won't be able to replace the driver with a robot until they replace the shippers and receivers and all other drivers with robots. In my 30 plus years in this industry I have yet to meet the shipper or receiver who came out to meet me in the driveway or staging yard to see why I was there. Quite the opposite actually, pick ups and deliveries often times took some investigation to; 1) determine which of the unmarked doors on the building I needed to go into to find one that would open and possibly yield the result of finding a live individual who could tell me the business I was looking for had moved across town (yeah I really want to see the first video of a robot encountering that, I am fairly confident it will be comedic gold), or 2) find a person who is intentionally playing hide and seek with me, because they want to leave the job of loading or unloading me for the next shift or after lunch, or 3) find the person who parked their car right in the middle of where I need to be backing into to get them to move it out of harms way,

I really could go on forever , but I assure anyone who is reading this, your job is safe until they first solve the above 3 (and I am sure at least 1000 more) issues that would currently befuddle the most well programmed computer/robot in the world. However, probably more pertinent than any of the above all I really need to do is recognize that at least once a month either my work computer or home computer will take a hissy fit and decide it really does not want to open the program I have selected, or better yet, decides it needs to reboot ........ Just Because......... Yep, there is the automated vehicle, car or truck, I want to be sharing the road with, you know the one travelling at 65 MPH while its processor is having trouble processing the information from the program into a proper command to whatever mechanism it is sending a command to, or its programming is telling it to shut down and restart..........., again while it is doing, yeah, 65 MPH on the highway, YIKES!!!!

Slowpoke

Posted:  1 year, 6 months ago

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Cold feet normal?

Lowry, Of course some nervous anticipation is normal. Your life is changing and you do not know at this point if it will be a positive or negative change because you have nothing to compare it to. The only piece of advice I can offer is there are hundreds of thousands out there just like you that have made it a positive change and are doing just fine. Yes there will be a period of adjustment and I will not begin to tell you life from this point on is going to be all roses, but I can tell you it will be what you make it. As with everything in life if you focus on the positive you will find there is a lot of positive to be had.

Sure wish you the best in all your adventures, Slowpoke

Posted:  1 year, 6 months ago

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Should Drivers Refuse To Work For Companies With Forced Dispatch?

Question slowpoke. Do you remember telling that driver the plan for the rest of the week to get him home? I would think that if he had known the plan from the get go, he would have been more likely to follow orders.

Good question Unholy, Yes, the whole week was explained, the whys and wherefores and how the plan was certain(failing a mechanical breakdown of course) to get him home, with decent miles for the week. I always tried to do that for everyone, but sometimes we just do not listen, as in the case of this particular driver. He heard something he did not want to hear and simply turned his ears off to the explanation. Any good dispatcher will work with you to get what you need/or want as long as they have time to work it into a plan. You know I used to joke with drivers who accused me of intentionally trying to mess up their lives with the following phrase, "Yep, I got out of bed this morning at 5:00am and the first thought that crossed my mind was, how can I make John Doe have a miserable day today?" Generally, that diffused the person getting worked up because it is completely ridiculous for any person who needs to get others to work with them on their plans, a dispatcher for example, to intentionally try to mess them up as much as possible.

There are not many certainties in this industry, but one of them is that if you are fortunate enough to have found a dispatcher or company that takes your needs into consideration on a regular basis (please notice I did not say every time), you have found a company or dispatcher that is worth sticking with. Yes, that carrier down the road may pay you an extra penny or two for every mile you turn, but then ask yourself, "what is knowing that your needs or wants are being considered as part of the planning process worth to you'"? I know what my answer is, PRICELESS, but of course you all need to come up with your own answer for that one.

Rainy brings up an excellent point, good communication goes two ways and sometimes you will need to let your dispatch know that their plan wont work, and that is not refusing dispatch. The Hours of Service problem is probably the best example, and if there is a legitimate concern about compliance, be prepared to discuss it with those planning the loads. Yes, even the best dispatcher in the world will overlook something sometimes and will be able to work through the problem with you and the customer, but you must be specific with what the problem is, do not just call up and say "I am not doing that, its illegal". Maybe it is, maybe the dispatcher missed something, maybe you are making an assumption that it has to be there at 6:00am because the last load you took to the same place had to be there at 6:00am, and the receiver gave you a blast for being 2 minutes late. What ever the reason you believe you can not do something, please call the dispatcher and use the following phrase (or something similar).

"I am not certain I will be able to meet the requirements of the next load you have assigned me, but maybe I have missed some important information" This type of statement will always open the door to communication as it is not in anyway threatening and very neutral in nature. It also assures the person hearing or reading it that you acknowledge it may be simply the need on your part for a little more information. I can only speak for myself, but as both a driver and dispatcher working together to find the solution to any problem will always work out with a better result than two parties doing everything they can to find their own solutions to a single problem that affects both parties.

Regards, Slowpoke

Posted:  1 year, 6 months ago

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Should Drivers Refuse To Work For Companies With Forced Dispatch?

If you only read and absorb a single article from this website this year, make the time to read and absorb the Should Drivers Refuse Forced Dispatch blog from Old School. If there is one thing the company and the driver have in common it is this simple rule.

The closer a driver gets to their maximum allowed driving hours every day, and the closer that driver gets to their maximum 70 weekly, the better the bottom line of both the driver and the company.

So many times I have seen people shoot themselves in the foot by having the attitude that "something is beneath them" or they "deserve better." Always ask yourself, does it really matter what the product is that I am loading, hauling or moving from point A to point B as long as it is within legal tolerances? Then ask yourself, does it really matter if the next 500 miles is on I-5, I-75 or I-95? No should be your answer to both questions as 40,000 pounds of baled hay is the same as 40K of Steel, Timber or Garbage for that matter, and 500 miles on any Interstate is 500 miles on your next pay. I remember as a dispatcher having a perfect 3100 mile week planned out for a driver that easily got him home for the time he had previously booked off for his daughters graduation ceremony.

The first part of it was about a 800 mile round trip, hook to loaded dry van in company yard, unload and reload at customer, at the same door no less, then drop that loaded trailer back in the company yard hook to another loaded trailer in the company yard deliver 1160 miles away, pickup 35 miles away and return the remaining 1130 miles to the company yard, drop trailer and have 24 hours to spare to make graduation ceremony. Unfortunately he wasn't having anything to do with that, he knew we had three loads leaving to his favorite destination that week and come hell or high water he was getting one of those.

I tried explaining to him that there was no guarantee of loads coming out of that area and returning to the company yard and that most likely we would have to have him load something in that area that would take him further away from home before being able to get him a load coming back to the yard and he would likely miss his daughters graduation. I remember his exact words "we will cross that bridge when we get to it, but for now you aint screwing me out of this good load". So if anyone guessed that things went rapidly downhill on Wednesday when he was empty and looking for his reload, you would be correct as all of a sudden I was the "so and so that was intentionally trying to screw him out of getting home to his daughters graduation" and "what an (expletive deleted) I am and this company should fire such an (expletive deleted)".

End result he refused the load, he drove the truck 1600 miles empty back to the terminal and was promptly fired by the terminal manager. I should mention that at this point the driver felt the terminal manager was an even bigger (expletive deleted) than his stupid dispatcher.

Your mind should be focused on the same question as your dispatcher, how do I get the maximum number of legal miles/hours out of this tractor this week? Life for you and your dispatcher/driver coordinator is going to get a whole lot easier at that point and you are going to see maximum payroll deposits in your bank account.

Regards, Slowpoke

Posted:  1 year, 8 months ago

View Topic:

What am I doing wrong?

T-Rex, You have received some great advice here and it is great to see that you recognized your trainer logging all time at the customer as off duty wasn't legal. Truth is there is a fine balance between wasting time, logging a 2 hour delivery all as on duty even though you were not required to be on duty for the full duration and being too frugal with your on duty time in that it throws up a red flag for enforcement as there is never any on duty time at deliveries and pick ups, which we all realize is impossible. Be realistic but not wasteful with your on duty time, just like not every vehicle inspection is going to take the exact same amount of time (therefore no one can tell you it has to be 5, 10, 15 or 30 minutes), not every delivery is going to take the exact same amount of time, so again no one can tell you a specific time it should take. The important thing to remember is this, does the story (your entry in the log/hours of service) match the facts (what actually takes place at the customer? For example if you enter 10 minutes on duty at the customer and the customer in fact said go wait in your tractor we will let you know when empty, chances are a 10 minute on duty period gives you a story matching the facts scenario. However, if you enter that same 10 minutes on duty time and the customer requires to do nothing more than inspect and count the product being loaded onto the trailer, or even has a policy that the driver must be in a "waiting room" during loading to prevent them from pulling out of the dock while being loaded, then I am sorry to tell you that time must be recorded as on duty not driving. You might ask yourself, who is really going to know what is going on at the loading dock? How will enforcement know that I was in a "holding or waiting room or even was required to inspect and count product? You would be asking a very valid question and there is no straight answer for it except this. The closer you are to the facility where you unloaded or loaded, the more likely it is someone (enforcement) will have detailed knowledge of the practices of that customer and of course the further away you get the more likely it is that someone (enforcement) wont have the foggiest idea. Which brings me back to my, make sure the story is a close representation of the facts. I will also suggest that to adequately arm yourself with the knowledge required to determine what is legitimate off duty and on duty time you read the definitions section of CFR 49 Part 395.2. Another important thing is make sure what comes out of your mouth matches the story you told on paper. I remember being in an inspection facility with a driver who was more than happy to tell the officer exactly what he thought about his carriers policy on making the driver load their own trailers and all he wanted to do was get to a shower after loading a trailer load of tires. Officer then asked him to bring his log current and the driver put down that he had been off duty for the approximate 3.5 hours he had just verbally admitted to the officer he was clearly required to be on duty. Two citations issued, 1) Log not current to last change of duty, 2) False log entries (oh and go park over there you are OOS for 10 hours, do not go to the truck stop, do not take a shower, do not have a warm meal etc.). Yep always make sure the story matches reality, or is something that "resembles reality". Even in this day of electronic logs where everyone thinks you wont be able to save yourself some time, enforcement knows full well that saving time on the customers property is going to become a matter of higher importance to drivers. You can bet your bottom dollar that if enforcement is aware of it, they will be more than happy to listen to your gripes and oh woe is me's, and then of course compare that information to your RODS (legal document).

Regards

Posted:  1 year, 9 months ago

View Topic:

Take Care of the Customer

I was taken a back by a driver a couple days ago that said he was on eld and when his clock hit zero he would just park his truck across the entrance.

Not sure why this would even need to be considered as an option on an ELD. There are both yard move and personal conveyance options available and depending on the specific circumstance both can possibly prevent an HOS violation from occurring. I would need a lot more information on the situation to make a determination if either were applicable. I know many of my drivers have spent so much time complaining about ELDs that they haven't bothered to read the positive documentation and procedural "how to's" that have been put out to them and then after 15 minutes of listening to them complain about how dumb the devices are and this is what they are causing, I get the privilege to read to them from a piece of paper they should have read themselves! Is the ELD another little thing that is going to make life a little more difficult at times, absolutely. Is it something that will be the death of the industry and cause the start of the zombie apocalypse as so many are predicting? Well I am pretty sure the sensible people here already know the answer to that one, so there is no need for me to babble on. Always take time to read what your company puts out to you, feel free to ask questions on things you do not understand or find confusing and ask them over and over again until you do understand. I have always failed to understand why my drivers feel it is a better idea to be obtaining their education from Enforcement Officials after they get into trouble for something they should have known than it is to read, listen and learn to keep themselves out of trouble in the first place.

Posted:  1 year, 9 months ago

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Opinion on driving a fuel tanker truck right out of cdl school?

James, I will be the first to admit I share the concerns of my colleagues here and I can appreciate your feeling of being pounced upon. I will do my best not to add to that feeling and simply ask a couple questions about the 2 to 3 month training program you mentioned.

1-1) Is this training under the direct supervision of an experienced individual and to ensure you understand what I mean by direct supervision, will the trainer always be a maximum of an arms length away from you?

1-2) Will the two to three months of training mentioned provide the opportunity to you being the operator of the vehicle at least 90% of the time including being the person charged with the responsibility with loading and unloading with the trainer only being there to ensure you are employing proper safety procedures throughout?

1-3) Is there a grade that must be obtained by you before being removed from under the guidance of the trainer and cut loose on your own?

1-4) Is the grading system documented and objective? In other words is there a sheet of paper that has a question such as "Does the trainee always exit the vehicle and check path before backing"? 1-5) Does this question include instruction to the trainer that they are to keep track of 10 events where the vehicle is placed in reverse by you and that their score is determined by the number of times you performed the task properly and when you only perform the task properly 7 of the 10 times you are scored 7 out of 10 or 70%?

1-6) Does the grading system let you know that you must achieve a minimum percentage of 80% (to chose a simple number) on each individual task and an overall minimum percentage of 85% (again to chose a simple number) before you will be considered for movement into a solo capacity?

1-7) Does the grading system require that you reach both of these minimum percentages 4 (random number) times in a row over a period of 2 (random time frame) months before you will be considered for a solo capacity?

OR

2-1) Will you simply be sent out with a guy who has done it before and will give the owner/boss a nod and wink if he thinks you might be okay?

James, if your training is something that appears like questions 1-1 through 1-7 above you at least stand a fighting chance of being successful and not being part of a major catastrophe. However, if the training mentioned looks more like question 2-1 above, run away as far and as fast as you can as you are obviously being trained by someone who has zero regard for anything but the bottom line profitability of the company and the safety and well being of their employees and the general public is way down the list of concerns, and that is definitely a real recipe for disaster.

There is already excellent advice in this forum, I hope mine gives you another way to look at and at the same time seriously consider where you want to be tomorrow and if this is the right move for you.

Regards,

Posted:  1 year, 10 months ago

View Topic:

Truck Inspection on a company vehicle.

While I realize this is a very old thread I thought I would shed some light on it for others to share in. The answer to this is fairly simple, fill out your driver vehicle inspection report indicating the things that you believe are defective and do not drive the vehicle until a mechanic has signed off on the statement of "vehicle not needing repairs to be safe to operate" Your job as a driver is not to be a mechanic and make the determinations of what is or is not safe, your job is to perform a proper inspection of the vehicle, record and report (in a written format) anything you believe is defective. It is then up to the carrier to determine if the items you listed as defective on your report are or are not defective. Those items the carrier finds to be defective must be repaired and signed off on as repaired by the mechanic performing the repairs on your inspection report. Those items that do not require repair must be signed off on by the mechanic performing the inspection of the component as not needing repair for the vehicle to be safe to operate. For more detail see CFR 49 Part 396.11 and I dont know if the link will work but regulatory guidance should give you a clearer idea of what to do in such circumstances. Specifically look at #7 in the guidance section.

Posted:  1 year, 11 months ago

View Topic:

Why do so many people get booted out of trucking? This is why...

I'm going to play devil's advocate here and say that there are things in the high road program that aren't necessarily asked on the written test I took in Iowa. So I can see the emailers point to an extent. Yes, we do need to know a lot of what the high road covers out here, I'm not knocking that. But we don't necessarily need to know and memorize absolutely EVERYTHING to get the CDL. Again, not knocking the high road program. It's a great tool to learn.

Unholychaos, I would be very surprised if any jurisdictions testing is exactly the same as any others. I know here our testing program has 200 different questions randomly generated by a computer. So 10 people may be taking the 20 question written test at the same time, but none of them are taking the exact same test as any of the others.

Slowpoke

Posted:  1 year, 11 months ago

View Topic:

Why do so many people get booted out of trucking? This is why...

Odd thing is I hear almost this exact same thing from seasoned drivers all the time when it comes to the training program established at my carrier, so it does not come as a surprise to me that someone looking to enter the industry would have that attitude coming in as well. I constantly keep hearing "I should not have to get 100% to pass the test" or "I should not have to watch the entire 6 minute video again to retake the test". Funny thing is I keep hearing from my trainers (yep even after 35 years in the industry I still take training courses), that a plaintiffs lawyer will tear us apart in court, in a personal injury case, if we settle for anything less than 100% To those wise enough to be a member of this website and continually reading this forum, this attitude is one of the hardest things to deal with as a manager in this industry. While I may agree with the sentiment, my job is to protect this company in the event that something serious does happen, and if the difference between a $5,000,000.00 and $50,000,000.00 judgement is your spending 6 more minutes watching a video again and achieving a 100% score as opposed to the 89% score you just got, sorry brother the 6 minutes of your time is going to lose that argument everyday of the week. All i can say is I wish there had been a resource like this some 35 years ago, maybe I would have had a couple less mistakes over the years. Keep up the great work Brett and definitely do not let one naysayer have a negative effect on what you are doing here. Slowpoke,

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Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

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About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

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Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

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