LTL Trucking - My Linehaul Job

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6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

Guy, thanks for the response! I was waiting for an experienced driver to chime in. What you're saying in regard to LTL companies recently starting to hire new drivers actually echoes what I've heard some other experienced drivers say. Who knows why this is trending. It's a great opportunity for new drivers if they're in the right place at the right time.

I was excited to see you were pulling sets. I still can't get over how weird it is to see a Werner sleeper pulling a set of ABF pups smile.gif Are you pretty much just pulling doubles for ABF now? How does that work between Werner and ABF? Wonder why ABF isn't just using their own drivers? I'm just curious. I hope you're enjoying it.

Pretty wild how 3 of us on the forum will be starting a new adventure w/ some sort of LTL affiliation. I'm hoping the exposure will give new drivers options that they didn't realize were available.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

Can't seem to find much of LTL in the Kentucky area.

Aaron, you might also not know how to search. You can use the list of LTL companies I compiled a few posts back, and then do a Google search w/ said company + terminal + Kentucky. You'll get hits. Or, go on a specific company's website and see if they have a page showing terminal / service center locations in KY. That'll get you started!

You're going to want to call those individual terminals and ask how to become a driver, whether they have a company school program or if you have to be a dock worker first. Don't be discouraged if a particular terminal doesn't give a satisfactory answer. Some of these terminals in the same company almost act like mini companies. Call another. Try another company. If they're not currently hiring, try again later. You might have to work a little harder or dig a little deeper to find an LTL opportunity, but they're there if you look for them. Hopefully you're in a good area.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

guyjax(Guy Hodges)'s Comment
member avatar

Guy, thanks for the response! I was waiting for an experienced driver to chime in. What you're saying in regard to LTL companies recently starting to hire new drivers actually echoes what I've heard some other experienced drivers say. Who knows why this is trending. It's a great opportunity for new drivers if they're in the right place at the right time.

I was excited to see you were pulling sets. I still can't get over how weird it is to see a Werner sleeper pulling a set of ABF pups smile.gif Are you pretty much just pulling doubles for ABF now? How does that work between Werner and ABF? Wonder why ABF isn't just using their own drivers? I'm just curious. I hope you're enjoying it.

Pretty wild how 3 of us on the forum will be starting a new adventure w/ some sort of LTL affiliation. I'm hoping the exposure will give new drivers options that they didn't realize were available.

Pretty much boils down to money. While I only heard this 2nd hand from a union driver ABF does not have enough drivers to cover the freight and the union does not have anymore drivers to send so between ABF and the union they opened up a 5 years contract for outside companies to heal freight.

This is the issue with most companies. Almost all operations are the same. The only real thing that you can promise customers is FASTER on time delivery which is hard to do with solo drivers. Team trucks never shut down except for hour issues.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Guy, thanks for the response! I was waiting for an experienced driver to chime in. What you're saying in regard to LTL companies recently starting to hire new drivers actually echoes what I've heard some other experienced drivers say. Who knows why this is trending. It's a great opportunity for new drivers if they're in the right place at the right time.

I was excited to see you were pulling sets. I still can't get over how weird it is to see a Werner sleeper pulling a set of ABF pups smile.gif Are you pretty much just pulling doubles for ABF now? How does that work between Werner and ABF? Wonder why ABF isn't just using their own drivers? I'm just curious. I hope you're enjoying it.

Pretty wild how 3 of us on the forum will be starting a new adventure w/ some sort of LTL affiliation. I'm hoping the exposure will give new drivers options that they didn't realize were available.

double-quotes-end.png

Pretty much boils down to money. While I only heard this 2nd hand from a union driver ABF does not have enough drivers to cover the freight and the union does not have anymore drivers to send so between ABF and the union they opened up a 5 years contract for outside companies to heal freight.

This is the issue with most companies. Almost all operations are the same. The only real thing that you can promise customers is FASTER on time delivery which is hard to do with solo drivers. Team trucks never shut down except for hour issues.

About 20 minutes from my house, towards Carlisle, PA, there's an ABF terminal with a sign draped over a trailer right alongside the road, "DRIVERS WANTED." Suppose that's telling. I probably should've applied with them, just to see what they had to offer, but I didn't. Pretty sure I'll be happy with the company that hired me.

So, I wonder what other companies they allowed to move their freight? Speaking of team drivers, I know you guys make some money OTR , and the one husband and wife couple I had breakfast with shared how much they're pulling in w/ one LTL carrier - $170,000 average, gross. They basically do what I do, out a week, home on the weekend. A linehaul bag run. Sounds pretty sweet, especially since they operate out of Kansas and run the west coast. They were in my area over 4th of July holiday, volunteering to work on the holiday weekend rather than go home. We both work for the same company, and holidays are optional.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

guyjax(Guy Hodges)'s Comment
member avatar

Speaking of Carlisle PA the load I picked up this morning was at the ABF terminal there. Lol. Every ABF terminal I have been to, about 15 now, they always want to know if I had thought about driving for them..... Duh of course I have. The reason I am not because the ABF terminal in North Little Rock AR is moving to Memphis next year and closing down there near my house. My house is bought and paid for so no I am not moving. Would be a sweet gig though.

Since I have full endorsements, except Harman which I will be getting soon, thinking about looking into LTL but I refuse to work on the dock in hopes of driving one day. Screw that! I have not really checked into what's around little rock.

As of the last time I checked, June 5th, I am on schedule to make 50k plus this year. Not to bad really. Out 7 weeks and in for a whole week.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier
6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

Speaking of Carlisle PA the load I picked up this morning was at the ABF terminal there. Lol. Every ABF terminal I have been to, about 15 now, they always want to know if I had thought about driving for them..... Duh of course I have. The reason I am not because the ABF terminal in North Little Rock AR is moving to Memphis next year and closing down there near my house. My house is bought and paid for so no I am not moving. Would be a sweet gig though.

Since I have full endorsements, except Harman which I will be getting soon, thinking about looking into LTL but I refuse to work on the dock in hopes of driving one day. Screw that! I have not really checked into what's around little rock.

As of the last time I checked, June 5th, I am on schedule to make 50k plus this year. Not to bad really. Out 7 weeks and in for a whole week.

Yep, you were in my neck of the woods then!

You probably already know that not every LTL carrier will make you work the dock as a driver. My company doesn't. What would you be into? P&D or L/H?

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

AJ D.'s Comment
member avatar

You probably already know that not every LTL carrier will make you work the dock as a driver. My company doesn't. What would you be into? P&D or L/H?

OK, guys ... I'm trying to continue my education here.

P&D = Pick up and Delivery .... moving around town between businesses and the terminal.

L/H = Line Haul ... taking loads from terminal to terminal

Is that the basic gist of the two?

grazie

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Line Haul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
guyjax(Guy Hodges)'s Comment
member avatar

I have done the P&D gigs. Would rather run terminal to terminal much like ABF does and Conway. I have also looked at Central, Siai and OD but it seems like a lot of them around Little Rock want package handlers part time(ups) or part time dock workers. CONWAY has an opening for a driver but not moving to Russellville AR.

Seriously I am pretty happy with Werner right now. More than enough miles. Pulling trailers and doing maneuvers most drivers would not think was possible with a truck and trailer. Pretty unique situation I am in right now but if I wanted to I guess I would have to fill out all the app and send them in and see what was offered and weed them out.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

AJ D.'s Comment
member avatar

Hey !!! This is Six String's first day on the job... Let's all wish him luck !!

Good luck, buddy ... be sure and drop a line everyday of your progress. :)

6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

Hey !!! This is Six String's first day on the job... Let's all wish him luck !!

Good luck, buddy ... be sure and drop a line everyday of your progress. :)

THanks man! Appreciate it.

As far as today, LOTS of videos to watch. Seriously, about 5 hours worth. Some more hazmat tests and reading. Company hazmat policy and safety. And then the typical HR paperwork, e.g. bank info for auto-deposit, benefit enrollment, etc... Got my truck keys, fuel card, hazmat handbook and reg book, 2 complimentary pad locks, and a camera.

I was told the 2nd week of training is P&D , 3rd and 4th weeks are L/H which will be night shift (in preparation for my night shift job, I'll just continue on night shift for when I start solo after week 3 and 4). This first week, I guess will be general driving, learning to put together sets, etc.... I'm actually heading south tomorrow, like down around VA/KY. I'll still be back home tomorrow evening. Remember, I'm home every day during 4 week training, off on the weekends. When I start my L/H gig, then I'll be out 5 days, off for 2.

So far? Loving it!!! So happy I went w/ this company. The benefits are fantastic. Better than the other OTR company I almost went with.

I'll make sure to keep this thread updated as I go, but I'm sure it won't be as frequently since I now, you know, ... HAVE A JOB! But I am committed to this thread, and want to share my experiences and knowledge with any new guys out there that had no idea about LTL , linehaul driving, or are just not sure if OTR is for them.

More later!

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
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