Comments By Don

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  • Don
  • Joined:
  • 2 years, 5 months ago
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Posted:  2 months, 4 weeks ago

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Fired for accident

I believe having a positive relationship with a trainer is very important, and can make or break a trainee's chances of succeeding. I thank my lucky stars that I had an excellent trainer. They can only do so much while the trainee is in the Captain's seat, though.

John, listen to G-town, Old School and the other Vets, and start contacting everyone and anyone and see if someone will give you a chance.

Posted:  2 months, 4 weeks ago

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How's Everyone Doing? How is Freight? Not Many Posts Lately

3 weeks ago, Our freight was slower than usual for a week. Since that week, it has been business as usual.

Posted:  2 months, 4 weeks ago

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Postcards from the Road! (Post Yours Please!)

Just following up to mention that under normal conditions, the 16hr exemption could be used only once per week. We haul boxes for food manufacturers, and I personally have not used an exemption a single time during the pandemic. Tyson's and Freshmark (Sugardale Meats) are ticking upwards again, though.

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When you say "a 16 hour day" what does it mean? You still couldn't drive past the 14 hr limit. Right? I am asking just so I understand how it is done.

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as Marc Lee touched on there is a special rule that applies to home daily drivers but I still can't drive over 11 hours. I often times debate whether or not to mention using the 16 rule because I dont want to confuse new drivers and someone get a violation thinking they're able to use it. Usually I'll post it to help others see that local driving usually isnt the "banker hours" most people think it is. I wont get too in depth but there are requirements that must be met such as returning to home base for the previous 5 consecutive work days among others. An OTR driver isn't allowed to claim this so you won't need to worry about it when you get started in this career. Also, currently in my line or work (delivering groceries) ALL hours or service rules have been suspended by the FMCSA while hauling certain loads due the 'Rona. My employer is allowing us to take advantage of that but the company is still requiring us to take the 30 minute break and 10 hours off before starting another run to help avoid fatigue. Last week I went over my 14 hour clock 3 of the 4 days. 2 days ended up being just over 16. In those 4 days I put in just shy of 57 hours.

Posted:  3 months ago

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Fired

I interpreted John's post as admitting he made a mistake and accepting responsibility for what occurred. Some people cannot immediately adapt to rotating or sporadic sleep patterns in their first week with a trainer. As G-town stated, even more so that John should have GOAL. Now, if he had been driving say, 5 months or so with 60,000+ miles under his belt and hit a mountain, and been fired a couple of times within his first year driving, then I could wonder if he was cut out for this.

Usually when ppl say something is 100% their fault they don’t go on to blame it on someone else

Posted:  3 months, 1 week ago

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What kind of drug test?

Mike, if you "can't go 90 days sober (and stand to be) with your woman", then you have a hard choice to make if you want to start the process of getting your CDL. I understand many do hair-follicle testing, but am not certain all do. Just my opinion, If you are serious in wanting to drive a Semi-tractor, you are going to have to give up the pot and any/all recreational drugs.

Aloha to all. I'm just a covid refugee holed up here in Hawaii. Got laid off for covid March 25th and been going crazy staying home, my girl and I both smoke weed, we argue too much if we don't. It don't make us all lovey-dovey, just makes it possible for us to live in the same house without bloodshed ;0). When I heard the paid training programs are still running I was ready to go, until I read the program I was headed for used hair follicle testing. I got no problem giving up the weed, but now I gotta wait 90 days, I can't go 90 day's sober with this woman, and I don't wanna poor that much alcohol down my throat either, seriously I'd need detox by the time I was done......Do all programs use hair follicle testing?

Thanks MM

Posted:  3 months, 2 weeks ago

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Why do you need a CB?

""Yet", what?

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This is a horrible accident, but in this situation, I'm not sure having a cb or not is relevant. I am only guessing, but this type of accident could have been due to driver inattention/distraction. If traffic was slowed or stopped due to an accident, the SWIFT driver would have seen tail lights/brake lights. No doubt, LEO would have had their lights on. I don't need to use my CB to know that I need to slow or stop ahead.

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This is why. This accident happened yesterday on 70 at the Ohio/Indiana border. Traffic was stopped for another accident, this driver was still running 60mph right into the back of the stopped flatbed. The driver of the Swift truck died, the impact was so hard that it broke the kingpin on the flatbed driving the trailer into the truck and knocking the cab off the frame.

Get a cb, use it and pay attention while driving. This should never happen.

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You left one word out, Don:

"Yet"

Posted:  3 months, 2 weeks ago

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Truckers report in on their treatment during these COVID-19 times

I have not experienced too many issues related to the pandemic. Sure, I have to fill out questionnaires at a couple of consignees or shippers; receivers only allowing one driver at a time in a small space; kept distances from others (hell, I've kept my distance from strangers while out in public for years!). Using common sense will get us through this. Unfortunately, it isn't my using common sense that is an issue. You are always going to have those morons who cough while walking by you, insist on getting up in my grill like they want to kiss me or something, or doing stupid stuff just to prove some point of "I ain't scared of no virus."

Posted:  3 months, 2 weeks ago

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Why do you need a CB?

Hey NavyPopPop! Yeah, I don't post often or comment a whole lot. I come here daily to read new posts, though. I just do my job delivering corrugated product (aka, boxes..haha) to our customers. With the exception of some slight changes relating to social distancing aspects at consignees, the pandemic hasn't really slowed down our work, nor drastically changed our routines. We are delivering to our customers as usual. And yourself?

Don,

How have you been? Don't see much of you here on TT anymore. I followed your progress faithfully from beginning to now. Hope everything is going good for you. Keep safe in these trying times.smile.gif

Posted:  3 months, 2 weeks ago

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Why do you need a CB?

You are on point. A CB is very useful, but would having one on have prevented this accident? Who knows what the driver was doing to cause him to slam into the back of the flatbed ahead of him. Were there skid marks indicating he even attempted to apply the brakes?

This should not have happened with or without a CB. We all come upon stopped or slowed traffic at least a couple times a week. If you are paying attention to the road ahead of you, you should be fine. If you need a CB to alert you to pay attention to the road ahead of you, find a new career. Often times, there are electronic signs along sides and above highways that warn of situations coming ahead to be cautious of, if drivers must have advanced warning to begin paying attention to the road rather than phone, radio, passenger, pets or whatever they deem more important than their actual job of driving.

Posted:  3 months, 2 weeks ago

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Why do you need a CB?

This is a horrible accident, but in this situation, I'm not sure having a cb or not is relevant. I am only guessing, but this type of accident could have been due to driver inattention/distraction. If traffic was slowed or stopped due to an accident, the SWIFT driver would have seen tail lights/brake lights. No doubt, LEO would have had their lights on. I don't need to use my CB to know that I need to slow or stop ahead.

1487075755.1629.jpg

This is why. This accident happened yesterday on 70 at the Ohio/Indiana border. Traffic was stopped for another accident, this driver was still running 60mph right into the back of the stopped flatbed. The driver of the Swift truck died, the impact was so hard that it broke the kingpin on the flatbed driving the trailer into the truck and knocking the cab off the frame.

Get a cb, use it and pay attention while driving. This should never happen.

Posted:  4 months, 3 weeks ago

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Should I become a truck driver or keep working as a nurse ?

I was a Nurse for 32 years. I KNEW it was time to get out. No one can - nor should they - tell you what you "should do" when considering changing careers. We have no idea your likes, interests, skills, aptitudes, etc.. Stating that, I am glad I changed careers, but I did so for my own reasons. I enjoy what I do now. Regarding your differences in income between Nursing and truck driving. If you are making $30.00/hr for a 40 hour week ( you probably work more than that), $1200/week as a beginning driver may be a reach. There are many variables that can affect your weekly pay driving a truck, which you have no control over. Truck breaking down, delays at a shipper or consignee, weather causing slow downs and delays, waiting for loads. All of these can affect your pay for a week.

You need to consider one thing regarding your Nursing license. If you do start the procedure of a trucking career, you will need to deactivate your Nursing license, since you will not be practicing. At least in Ohio, we do. Depending on how long you continue in your new career and remain out of Nursing, if you decide you don't like it and want to go back to Nursing, your State board of Nursing will no doubt require you to take refresher courses It's possible they could even require you to repeat your education. If you have not done so, you should check with your State's board of nursing about their guidelines/requirements on deactivating your license. Your State may have a grace period where you do not have to make it inactive until after a period of time you have not practiced. That way, if you decide to go to school to attempt to get your CDL, and either do not complete the training or decide you do not want to continue, you could jump right back into another nursing job.

Posted:  4 months, 3 weeks ago

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Getting hired with a 15+ over the limit ticket.

Breezie, being that you have been driving for 15-plus years, I would assume you have experienced dry spells in the past and learned how to deal with dispatch and/or management on how to rectify them. Is there a slow down in the demand for what WE ships? Are other WE drivers in your region experiencing the same lack of miles? Maybe there are issues occurring at WE that you are not aware of, that are contributing to why your loads and/or miles are low? If none of the above, then you need to find out why you are not getting loads. PJ's replies make complete sense, both in general, and in particular to the driver/management relationship. I am sure with your experience, you already know that your condition may not change until you have a heart to heart with management and/or your driver manager. Having not done so due to being with Western Express for such a short time and "not wanting to rock the boat", could certainly be understandable. Yet, you will be the one that suffers If you do not discuss your concerns with them. Consider PJ's suggestions. If not, your current situation may not change.

Posted:  5 months ago

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Do you carry a jug of engine oil?

We charge oil, coolant or washer fluid on our comdata card as needed. Other purchases require approval.

Posted:  5 months ago

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High hooked another trailer today...... Had to do the Crank of Shame

I have high hoojed one time during my first weeks with CFI, at night. What a PITA. I learned real wuick not to be in a hurry and to watch my 5th wheel in relation to the trailer height. I try to have the top of my 5th wheel touching the bottom of the trailer when I have backed underneath just a couple of inches. I try not to be so close that I shear off my 5th wheel grease though. Lol. Our company uses a dirt lot, so you can imagine the trailers sinking in very wet weather. Luckily we have air dumps on our Macks.

Posted:  5 months, 1 week ago

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Im really tired of this, this week...

Forgot to mention that at our lot, someone (wink..wink..) has left some 2x6's to use under the landing gear to help keep the landing gear more stable and not sink into the mud. Hopefully, someone doesn't find my "stash" and take it.

Posted:  5 months, 1 week ago

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Im really tired of this, this week...

Victor, it is unfortunate that you have had difficult periods in your life. You may feel differently, but I guarantee there are thousands if not millions who have probably had worse struggles in life than you. Being new to the trucking industry, we typically imagine the minor things we experience as being major problems. I would believe that every driver in this forum have thought, "I'm getting tired of this" when facing situations. In the particular case of your trailer being in that mud hole, I don't really see a huge issue. You should see the lot where our company parks their trailers! Drivers have literally gotten stuck after hooking up to their trailers, and had to be pulled out. Just as many others, I have dealt with this exact situation.

You may already know what to do in this situation, but when the trailer was too low to get the fifth wheel under it after lowering the airbags, what I have done is: I lower the airbags (if you have them) and thus, the chassis, back the tractor chassis ONLY under the trailer and raise the airbags. Then crank the trailer landing gear down to support the trailer. Then, again lower the airbags and back fully under the trailer, hooking the fifth wheel to complete my hookup. If the landing gear has only further sunk into the mud when lowered them, then I raise the landing gear just enough and PUSH the trailer BACK just enough to get onto more solid ground, then drop the landing gear and continue as previously mentioned. This beats repeatedly slamming the 5th wheel against the trailer headboard, trying to force the 5th wheel under the trailer when it is way too low. I have seen this be attempted, SMH and thinking to myself "explain that damage to the boss." Not quite sure what the issue was with the gladhand on the trailer. As you gain valuable experience these "major", stress inducing events will become minor or trivial issues. Oh, you will always deal with irritating situations, but also will learn how to deal with them. I am still fairly new (<2years), and still become irritated when a new situation arises, but have become much more adapt in dealing with them. I also think to myself: "Well, do you want to go back to what you were doing before (uhh, no, not really) or do you want to take a deep breath or two, deal with this, and then move on?" "It" will get better for you. Hang in there.

Posted:  5 months, 2 weeks ago

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Ghosting Your Company

You ( the OP) have ghosted one company and are going to do the same with SWIFT? After two weeks? Why? Because of the account you are on? Speak with your managers about going to another account. You may find you will settle in. Also, I can understand if you have come to the realization that trucking as a whole "isn"t for you", but do the mature and responsible thing and notify SWIFT of your intention of leaving. You are only hurting yourself and future prospects of employment if you follow through with your idea.

Posted:  5 months, 2 weeks ago

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Boil it down -- what do you LOVE about trucking?

1.The office view (yes, even in Winter). 2. The solitude I gain spending the majority of my day with 3 people only - me, myself and I. 3. The simplicity of what my duties are. Get a load, deliver that load, return to base (or other) for next load. Yeah, I know there is much more involved, but as it's basis, that's what we do. 4. Knowing others are counting on me to get their product to them on time. Now, if they would only clear the ice from their declining docks, so I can leave after delivery.

Posted:  5 months, 2 weeks ago

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You cant makey money saying no

Being a "local" driver driving a day cab is a different animal from Around the Clock OTR, I am comparing apples to oranges. Knowing that, declining a load because it is "too short" isn't an option. Besides, I cannot "refuse a load", unless it will put me over my 14 before getting back to home base. Doing so will get me shown the door. I will get a 2-3 mile run within Wooster, or an 8 mile run to a customer in a nearby town, unload or drop and return to base for my next load. The only saving grace is our mileage rate is on a sliding scale. Thankfully, I don't get these types of runs often. Give me a nice 500 mile round trip to Buffalo or Dunkirk, NY and I will be happy every time, of course. Well, except when there is bad Winter weather along I-90E.

Posted:  5 months, 4 weeks ago

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Well this sucks :( Sent home from Prime

Ugh, I wish I would use the quote button correctly!

This is true.

When you land a job, give them everything you've got for a minimum of one year. After one year your career will be on solid footing, you'll understand the industry much better, and then you can make a move if you really want tobut chances are you won't want to. Once a person gets a great reputation, builds strong relationships, and understands how their company operates, they're making excellent money and they're happy right where they are.

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