Professional Driving Behavior.

Topic 32335 | Page 1

Page 1 of 1
BK's Comment
member avatar

One thing I have learned here is to be professional and courteous on the road. There are so many drivers that don’t have a clue as to what that means.

For example, I often come up to a truck going slower than me. When it’s safe, I will pull out and start to pass. Then I see that the other truck has increased speed and is matching my speed. What are my choices? I can stay in the passing lane and irritate everybody who has come up behind me, or I can slow down to fall into the slow lane, further irritating those behind me who don’t realize what is going on. This is really no choice at all, I have to slow down and get into the right lane so as to not impede traffic. More often than not this type of situation is caused by what I call a “yo-yo driver”. This is a driver who has inconsistent speed for no reason at all. They seem to delight in going slow to require other trucks to pass and then speeding up to play some sort of stupid, sadistic game.

When I encounter this, I slow down so as to get away from such an unprofessional driver. Unfortunately, I might encounter him again up the road.

What’s my point? New drivers, learn to avoid bad habits like this. We, as drivers, have a responsibility to control traffic within our area of travel. Have situational awareness. Don’t get into turtle races. If there is another truck trying to pass you and they are just 1 MPH faster than you and there are vehicles behind them, reduce your speed enough to let the log jam clear. This is called profession courtesy. It seems like there are more and more drivers on the road who have no concept of this issue.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
RealDiehl's Comment
member avatar

That's a difficult situation. First I think about the road conditions when something similar happens and I've had to give up on the pass. Any hills? No. Then I wonder, "should I blink my lights at them as I move back into the right lane as a reminder for them to maintain speed?" They might get all bent out if shape if I do that, right? Then I'm stuck behind an angry driver. So if I start creeping up on them again I wait for another opportunity to pass. Just try to make sure I have lots of space...no cars or other trucks coming up behind me.

I've found that if you can stay in the left lane long enough the other driver will eventually ease up whether they mean to or not. And sometimes you just have to set the cruise a couple mph slower and wait it out.

Travis's Comment
member avatar

What I find as bad is a car, which for no discernible reason, is going about 64.7 in the right lane when the limit is 70. Just enough it takes me forever goverened at 65 to pass them.

Why are you doing 64.7 on a sunny day, no mountains nor curves interstate? 🤔👎

One thing I have learned here is to be professional and courteous on the road. There are so many drivers that don’t have a clue as to what that means.

For example, I often come up to a truck going slower than me. When it’s safe, I will pull out and start to pass. Then I see that the other truck has increased speed and is matching my speed. What are my choices? I can stay in the passing lane and irritate everybody who has come up behind me, or I can slow down to fall into the slow lane, further irritating those behind me who don’t realize what is going on. This is really no choice at all, I have to slow down and get into the right lane so as to not impede traffic. More often than not this type of situation is caused by what I call a “yo-yo driver”. This is a driver who has inconsistent speed for no reason at all. They seem to delight in going slow to require other trucks to pass and then speeding up to play some sort of stupid, sadistic game.

When I encounter this, I slow down so as to get away from such an unprofessional driver. Unfortunately, I might encounter him again up the road.

What’s my point? New drivers, learn to avoid bad habits like this. We, as drivers, have a responsibility to control traffic within our area of travel. Have situational awareness. Don’t get into turtle races. If there is another truck trying to pass you and they are just 1 MPH faster than you and there are vehicles behind them, reduce your speed enough to let the log jam clear. This is called profession courtesy. It seems like there are more and more drivers on the road who have no concept of this issue.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Don's Comment
member avatar

Is this sarcasm? If not, sunny weather or not, maybe they are driving 64.7 mph in a 70mph Maximum speed zone because they don't want to drive the maximum speed. 70 is the maximum, not the minimum. Just because fools want to be a danger out on the highways, doesn't mean everyone does. I assume you drive in the States? Are they supposed to drive faster than they are comfortable doing so in the RIGHT lane, just because you're impatient? No

What I find as bad is a car, which for no discernible reason, is going about 64.7 in the right lane when the limit is 70. Just enough it takes me forever goverened at 65 to pass them.

Why are you doing 64.7 on a sunny day, no mountains nor curves interstate? 🤔👎

double-quotes-start.png

One thing I have learned here is to be professional and courteous on the road. There are so many drivers that don’t have a clue as to what that means.

For example, I often come up to a truck going slower than me. When it’s safe, I will pull out and start to pass. Then I see that the other truck has increased speed and is matching my speed. What are my choices? I can stay in the passing lane and irritate everybody who has come up behind me, or I can slow down to fall into the slow lane, further irritating those behind me who don’t realize what is going on. This is really no choice at all, I have to slow down and get into the right lane so as to not impede traffic. More often than not this type of situation is caused by what I call a “yo-yo driver”. This is a driver who has inconsistent speed for no reason at all. They seem to delight in going slow to require other trucks to pass and then speeding up to play some sort of stupid, sadistic game.

When I encounter this, I slow down so as to get away from such an unprofessional driver. Unfortunately, I might encounter him again up the road.

What’s my point? New drivers, learn to avoid bad habits like this. We, as drivers, have a responsibility to control traffic within our area of travel. Have situational awareness. Don’t get into turtle races. If there is another truck trying to pass you and they are just 1 MPH faster than you and there are vehicles behind them, reduce your speed enough to let the log jam clear. This is called profession courtesy. It seems like there are more and more drivers on the road who have no concept of this issue.

double-quotes-end.png

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Bird-One's Comment
member avatar

I agree. The right is the granny lane. If they are doing 5 under in the left lane different story. That lane is for passing. Not the right. Don’t be the one tailgating in the far right lane. Go around.

Is this sarcasm? If not, sunny weather or not, maybe they are driving 64.7 mph in a 70mph Maximum speed zone because they don't want to drive the maximum speed. 70 is the maximum, not the minimum. Just because fools want to be a danger out on the highways, doesn't mean everyone does. I assume you drive in the States? Are they supposed to drive faster than they are comfortable doing so in the RIGHT lane, just because you're impatient? No

double-quotes-start.png

What I find as bad is a car, which for no discernible reason, is going about 64.7 in the right lane when the limit is 70. Just enough it takes me forever goverened at 65 to pass them.

Why are you doing 64.7 on a sunny day, no mountains nor curves interstate? 🤔👎

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

One thing I have learned here is to be professional and courteous on the road. There are so many drivers that don’t have a clue as to what that means.

For example, I often come up to a truck going slower than me. When it’s safe, I will pull out and start to pass. Then I see that the other truck has increased speed and is matching my speed. What are my choices? I can stay in the passing lane and irritate everybody who has come up behind me, or I can slow down to fall into the slow lane, further irritating those behind me who don’t realize what is going on. This is really no choice at all, I have to slow down and get into the right lane so as to not impede traffic. More often than not this type of situation is caused by what I call a “yo-yo driver”. This is a driver who has inconsistent speed for no reason at all. They seem to delight in going slow to require other trucks to pass and then speeding up to play some sort of stupid, sadistic game.

When I encounter this, I slow down so as to get away from such an unprofessional driver. Unfortunately, I might encounter him again up the road.

What’s my point? New drivers, learn to avoid bad habits like this. We, as drivers, have a responsibility to control traffic within our area of travel. Have situational awareness. Don’t get into turtle races. If there is another truck trying to pass you and they are just 1 MPH faster than you and there are vehicles behind them, reduce your speed enough to let the log jam clear. This is called profession courtesy. It seems like there are more and more drivers on the road who have no concept of this issue.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
BK's Comment
member avatar

What I find as bad is a car, which for no discernible reason, is going about 64.7 in the right lane when the limit is 70. Just enough it takes me forever goverened at 65 to pass them.

Why are you doing 64.7 on a sunny day, no mountains nor curves interstate? 🤔👎

double-quotes-start.png

One thing I have learned here is to be professional and courteous on the road. There are so many drivers that don’t have a clue as to what that means.

For example, I often come up to a truck going slower than me. When it’s safe, I will pull out and start to pass. Then I see that the other truck has increased speed and is matching my speed. What are my choices? I can stay in the passing lane and irritate everybody who has come up behind me, or I can slow down to fall into the slow lane, further irritating those behind me who don’t realize what is going on. This is really no choice at all, I have to slow down and get into the right lane so as to not impede traffic. More often than not this type of situation is caused by what I call a “yo-yo driver”. This is a driver who has inconsistent speed for no reason at all. They seem to delight in going slow to require other trucks to pass and then speeding up to play some sort of stupid, sadistic game.

When I encounter this, I slow down so as to get away from such an unprofessional driver. Unfortunately, I might encounter him again up the road.

What’s my point? New drivers, learn to avoid bad habits like this. We, as drivers, have a responsibility to control traffic within our area of travel. Have situational awareness. Don’t get into turtle races. If there is another truck trying to pass you and they are just 1 MPH faster than you and there are vehicles behind them, reduce your speed enough to let the log jam clear. This is called profession courtesy. It seems like there are more and more drivers on the road who have no concept of this issue.

double-quotes-end.png

I don’t know the exact right answer, but I tend to agree with Travis. His scenario is very common and can be very frustrating. You really have two choices in that situation. Stay behind the car, put on cruise for 65 and let the cruise keep you at the proper following distance. What I do sometimes is to pass the car until my tractor gets ahead of the car. Then I will put on my right turn signal in hopes that the driver will see it and either speed up or slow down to let me get to the right lane before there’s a major line of vehicles behind me. If I can’t get by in a reasonable amount of time, I will slow down enough to get back behind the car and just wait it out. After all, I want to go at my maximum governed speed, 68 in my case, but I will spend many miles going 67 behind a car or truck if I need to do that to benefit the traffic flow. Just depends on the circumstances. \

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Travis's Comment
member avatar

Mostly just a gripe I have. I don't tailgate them or flash my lights or anything. I'll pass if I have enough room and time without backing up traffic, which is easier with 3 lanes in my direction as opposed to 2.

Is this sarcasm? If not, sunny weather or not, maybe they are driving 64.7 mph in a 70mph Maximum speed zone because they don't want to drive the maximum speed. 70 is the maximum, not the minimum. Just because fools want to be a danger out on the highways, doesn't mean everyone does. I assume you drive in the States? Are they supposed to drive faster than they are comfortable doing so in the RIGHT lane, just because you're impatient? No

double-quotes-start.png

What I find as bad is a car, which for no discernible reason, is going about 64.7 in the right lane when the limit is 70. Just enough it takes me forever goverened at 65 to pass them.

Why are you doing 64.7 on a sunny day, no mountains nor curves interstate? 🤔👎

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

One thing I have learned here is to be professional and courteous on the road. There are so many drivers that don’t have a clue as to what that means.

For example, I often come up to a truck going slower than me. When it’s safe, I will pull out and start to pass. Then I see that the other truck has increased speed and is matching my speed. What are my choices? I can stay in the passing lane and irritate everybody who has come up behind me, or I can slow down to fall into the slow lane, further irritating those behind me who don’t realize what is going on. This is really no choice at all, I have to slow down and get into the right lane so as to not impede traffic. More often than not this type of situation is caused by what I call a “yo-yo driver”. This is a driver who has inconsistent speed for no reason at all. They seem to delight in going slow to require other trucks to pass and then speeding up to play some sort of stupid, sadistic game.

When I encounter this, I slow down so as to get away from such an unprofessional driver. Unfortunately, I might encounter him again up the road.

What’s my point? New drivers, learn to avoid bad habits like this. We, as drivers, have a responsibility to control traffic within our area of travel. Have situational awareness. Don’t get into turtle races. If there is another truck trying to pass you and they are just 1 MPH faster than you and there are vehicles behind them, reduce your speed enough to let the log jam clear. This is called profession courtesy. It seems like there are more and more drivers on the road who have no concept of this issue.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Nathan S.'s Comment
member avatar

I deal with this almost daily. I’m governed at 65 and when I try to pass some yahoo on their phone whose zoned out they speed up and trap me. So I do what you do fall back and try again down the road.

One thing I have learned here is to be professional and courteous on the road. There are so many drivers that don’t have a clue as to what that means.

For example, I often come up to a truck going slower than me. When it’s safe, I will pull out and start to pass. Then I see that the other truck has increased speed and is matching my speed. What are my choices? I can stay in the passing lane and irritate everybody who has come up behind me, or I can slow down to fall into the slow lane, further irritating those behind me who don’t realize what is going on. This is really no choice at all, I have to slow down and get into the right lane so as to not impede traffic. More often than not this type of situation is caused by what I call a “yo-yo driver”. This is a driver who has inconsistent speed for no reason at all. They seem to delight in going slow to require other trucks to pass and then speeding up to play some sort of stupid, sadistic game.

When I encounter this, I slow down so as to get away from such an unprofessional driver. Unfortunately, I might encounter him again up the road.

What’s my point? New drivers, learn to avoid bad habits like this. We, as drivers, have a responsibility to control traffic within our area of travel. Have situational awareness. Don’t get into turtle races. If there is another truck trying to pass you and they are just 1 MPH faster than you and there are vehicles behind them, reduce your speed enough to let the log jam clear. This is called profession courtesy. It seems like there are more and more drivers on the road who have no concept of this issue.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
NaeNaeInNC's Comment
member avatar

Same. For the most part, I'll even kick cruise off for a second if someone is trying to pass me, so that they can get ahead of me a teensy bit faster. I don't like being hung out to dry trying to pass, and I don't like doing it to other drivers.

I deal with this almost daily. I’m governed at 65 and when I try to pass some yahoo on their phone whose zoned out they speed up and trap me. So I do what you do fall back and try again down the road.

double-quotes-start.png

One thing I have learned here is to be professional and courteous on the road. There are so many drivers that don’t have a clue as to what that means.

For example, I often come up to a truck going slower than me. When it’s safe, I will pull out and start to pass. Then I see that the other truck has increased speed and is matching my speed. What are my choices? I can stay in the passing lane and irritate everybody who has come up behind me, or I can slow down to fall into the slow lane, further irritating those behind me who don’t realize what is going on. This is really no choice at all, I have to slow down and get into the right lane so as to not impede traffic. More often than not this type of situation is caused by what I call a “yo-yo driver”. This is a driver who has inconsistent speed for no reason at all. They seem to delight in going slow to require other trucks to pass and then speeding up to play some sort of stupid, sadistic game.

When I encounter this, I slow down so as to get away from such an unprofessional driver. Unfortunately, I might encounter him again up the road.

What’s my point? New drivers, learn to avoid bad habits like this. We, as drivers, have a responsibility to control traffic within our area of travel. Have situational awareness. Don’t get into turtle races. If there is another truck trying to pass you and they are just 1 MPH faster than you and there are vehicles behind them, reduce your speed enough to let the log jam clear. This is called profession courtesy. It seems like there are more and more drivers on the road who have no concept of this issue.

double-quotes-end.png

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Page 1 of 1

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More