What Do You Eat While On The Road? Is It Possible To Pre-pack Meals?

Topic 10435 | Page 2

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The Little Trucker's Comment
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I've got some great recipes to share if you lije things spicy. Here's a good one.

Cajun Pasta

olive oil 2 chicken breasts diced up 1/2 lb of andoulle. I use chorizo since its easier to find. 1 tablespoon (or more lol) Cajun seasoning fresh garlic chicken broth (about 5 cups) Sliced onions sliced bell peppers sliced mushrooms cream pasta (about 1 lb for full recipe) parmesean cheese

heat olive oil and cook chicken and sausage, adding Cajun seasoning. Add onions, peppers, garlic, and mushrooms. Add chicken broth. Put in 1 lb of pasta, and when pasta is about cooked add cream (I use half and half) a cup of shredded parmesean cheese and stir.

OTR Adaptation

While on hometime, cook your meats and cajun seasoning and pack that up and freeze it. When ready to cook pop that into your crock pot, add the other ingredients and roll on down the road. You'll have an awesome cajun dinner in no time. Use those crockpot baggies for easy clean up. If you make a full size batch you'll have plenty to share and leftovers too.

I think I'm lucky as the company I'm going with has apu in all the trucks so a regular crockpot will work for me and don't have to deal with the 12v. And yes, my 1st purchase will be a fridge/freezer.

What is an APU or a 12v?

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

Beth S.'s Comment
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What is an APU or a 12v?

APU = power thingy that apparently converts DC (truck electric) to AC (like house electric) so you can use regular appliance.

12v = 12-volt, so things that plug into the doohickey formerly known as a cigarette lighter that is now where the car charger for the cell phone goes

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

The Little Trucker's Comment
member avatar
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What is an APU or a 12v?

double-quotes-end.png

APU = power thingy that apparently converts DC (truck electric) to AC (like house electric) so you can use regular appliance.

12v = 12-volt, so things that plug into the doohickey formerly known as a cigarette lighter that is now where the car charger for the cell phone goes

Thanks. I'm learning more and more and more!

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

The Little Trucker's Comment
member avatar

Has anyone heard of a truckers cookbook? Someone recommended I nab one because they help with nutrition while traveling but I can't find one anywhere.

Shumenka's Comment
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Has anyone heard of a truckers cookbook? Someone recommended I nab one because they help with nutrition while traveling but I can't find one anywhere.

If you go to Amazon and search "truckers cookbook" there are many results.

djwaglmuffin's Comment
member avatar

What about, occasionally, stopping at a rest stop and whipping out the ye'old and tiny camp stove.

They make this one called Biolite; it runs on wood and comes with lots of nifty attachments. There's a kit out now that comes with the stove, grill attachment and then they have the biokettle which is another awesome addon.

And then, of course, there are the small backpacking stoves but they require screw on isobutane fuels.

Anyway, I'm considering diving into homesteading techniques. Canning, packing my own dehydrated food, etc. Just something to supplement and carrying fruit. My mom was a trucker and refused to eat fast food when she was OTR. Said it made her feel awful for most of the trip.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

The Little Trucker's Comment
member avatar

What about, occasionally, stopping at a rest stop and whipping out the ye'old and tiny camp stove.

They make this one called Biolite; it runs on wood and comes with lots of nifty attachments. There's a kit out now that comes with the stove, grill attachment and then they have the biokettle which is another awesome addon.

And then, of course, there are the small backpacking stoves but they require screw on isobutane fuels.

Anyway, I'm considering diving into homesteading techniques. Canning, packing my own dehydrated food, etc. Just something to supplement and carrying fruit. My mom was a trucker and refused to eat fast food when she was OTR. Said it made her feel awful for most of the trip.

I'm still learning about how to pack dehydrated food. I also found out about something called Meals in jars via Allie Knight, so that's something I'm looking at as well. I'll look into getting a camping stove--great idea!!! Also, I found out on Youtube that iceless coolers and refrigerators are the way to go. They are deep and can rely solely on your truck's power to make it through.

Fast food not only makes you feel awful for most of the trip, but it also will create tons of health issues for you, help put on and keep on those unhealthy, unwanted pounds, increases your chances for food poisoning, drains your wallet of all of your hardearned money, and makes you feel tired. I will avoid it the best I can.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
djwaglmuffin's Comment
member avatar
Also, I found out on Youtube that iceless coolers and refrigerators are the way to go. They are deep and can rely solely on your truck's power to make it through.

Yeti makes a really nice small cooler but they are REALLY expensive. At least $200 for the 45 size. You still need ice, or at least those reusable freeze cubes. These coolers will keep stuff cold for longer then a week, though.

But I thought some trucks came equipped with the capability to hold one of those tiny little micro fridges. If you get a dorm fridge...? Then again, I imagine a cooler would be easier to lug around. And you can use these Yetis as chairs, so if you do the camp stove thing periodically, you'll have something to set up on. :)

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
The Little Trucker's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Also, I found out on Youtube that iceless coolers and refrigerators are the way to go. They are deep and can rely solely on your truck's power to make it through.

double-quotes-end.png

Yeti makes a really nice small cooler but they are REALLY expensive. At least $200 for the 45 size. You still need ice, or at least those reusable freeze cubes. These coolers will keep stuff cold for longer then a week, though.

But I thought some trucks came equipped with the capability to hold one of those tiny little micro fridges. If you get a dorm fridge...? Then again, I imagine a cooler would be easier to lug around. And you can use these Yetis as chairs, so if you do the camp stove thing periodically, you'll have something to set up on. :)

I think most trucks come with the capability to hold a dorm size fridge but some of the truckers I know as well as some of the truckers I watch on Youtube carry both a cooler and a fridge. They use the cooler so that they can have a lot of cold drinks or snacks or just more room for food since those dorm size refrigerators are prettty small.

You can go on Amazon.com and find a really nice iceless cooler for like $70 bucks. So however nice the Yeti one is it won't be going in MY truck.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
's Comment
member avatar

Swift will allow the inverter but insist they install it professionally. Dont know what happens when they change trucks on you.

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