Personal Safety.

Topic 1046 | Page 1

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Joe S. (a.k.a. The Blue 's Comment
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Warehouses are not known to be in the safest parts of a city usually. And some truck stops. I have heard stories of the lot lozzards, the con games, and other things going on around truck stops.

Has anyone ever felt unsafe or in fear of harm when at a warehouse or a truck stop?

Other than looking over your shoulder and the normal safety measures, such as keeping your eyes open and don't take stupid chances, does anyone else have any points on safety?

Thanks, Keep it safe out there, Joe S.

Greg's Comment
member avatar

I do P/D within the SF Bay Area and I am often in bad areas such as east and west oakland, and other bad areas on a near daily basis, i just keep my doors locked and avoid eye contact with anyone and people dont bother me. Unless im backing in off the street in san francisco then i get cussed at and honked at and flipped off haha

's Comment
member avatar

does anyone else have any points on safety?

Thanks, Keep it safe out there, Joe S.

thats why a lot of truckers whether they admit it or not carry a piece. Its for self protection. Think about it, you are pulling up to a back dock at 3AM and you get out of your truck, you might be surrounded by 5 hobos ready to rob you and steal your truck. Some of these bad areas even the police wont go into so you have to take matters into your own hands.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
guyjax(Guy Hodges)'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

does anyone else have any points on safety?

Thanks, Keep it safe out there, Joe S.

double-quotes-end.png

thats why a lot of truckers whether they admit it or not carry a piece. Its for self protection. Think about it, you are pulling up to a back dock at 3AM and you get out of your truck, you might be surrounded by 5 hobos ready to rob you and steal your truck. Some of these bad areas even the police wont go into so you have to take matters into your own hands.

If 5 hobos are ready to jump you the second you get out of the truck then a gun won't help if your outside and the gun is inside the truck. Besides with those numbers against you they would have a new gun and you would be empty handed.

Either you carry a gun legally or you don't. There is no gray area here. If you travel legal with a firearm the ammo and weapon are stored separately and that will do you no good against 5 hobos. If you travel with it loaded and within reach now its become illegal cause you are going on to property that has clears signs that say No Weapons on their property. Remember your rights end where other peoples rights begin and that includes the right not to allow armed citizens/workers on their property. Not to mention scale house where no firearms are allow at all.

Either you claim the right to bare arms and follow ALL the laws including the ones that protect other peoples rights about not wanting firearms on their property and company policies not allowing firearms in the companies trucks....

Or you dont follow the laws and carry where every you want and go against everything you claim to be standing up for. Can't have it both ways.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Joe S. (a.k.a. The Blue 's Comment
member avatar

WOW. Never even dreamed this would turn into a discussion about carrying a firearm. Anyone that has ever read the laws, and as guyjax points out, it is illegal.

The law says you can carry a firearm ONLY if the ammunition is not within easy access. Such as the cab of the truck. And as guyjax said, most times you are going onto property where firearms are banned.

That is not even mentioning about the policy of the company you are working for. It is their truck, not yours. They are just loaning it to you. And for the O/O. You have "leased" that truck to them. You now have to abide by ALL of their policies. Including firearm control.

Didn't know about the scales being illegal, but makes total sense. I mean what DOT person wants to be thinking about firearms when he/she is inspecting a CMV?

I am a 100% gun advocate. I believe in the rights to have and to carry a weapon. But this topic was not intended to start something on gun rights.

This was just a question for EXPERIENCED drivers for tips on what they have learned over the years to keep others on their toes.

And as far as hobos jumping me for my truck. I can't see that really happening. Gang bangers, for sure. But hobos. Most hobos are just normal people down on their luck. You will find many vets in hobo towns. While I have not been to a lot of them (hobo towns), I have seen them around. And I have even talked to a few of the "hobos". Pretty nice people some times. Just not too clean, but you wouldn't be either if you lived on the streets 24/7.

Keep it safe out there. Joe S.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards
Dave D. (Armyman)'s Comment
member avatar

I have a CCW. I got mine after my pick up was broken into. I thought I lived in a good neighborhood. As for OTR , it isn't worth it. Believe me, there have been times that I have been tempted to carry. Especially in summer time. The lot lizards, "salesmen," and "helpful trucker" (although, I have to admit he was being helpful), it gets kind of scary. Most of my encounters have been at truck stops.

Dave

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
ThinksTooMuch's Comment
member avatar

This is one reason I like driving a chemical tanker for Schneider. So far, most of the places I have been to require a TWIC and are completely gated and have a few security guardhouses around. Chemical plants are probably not the first choice for those who want to rob a truck driver. I haven't had a delivery at 3:00am yet, but I have had to start driving from a truck stop at those times, and I have not felt unsafe yet. I park where it is well lit, I roll down my window before I get out and look around, then I get out and make straight for the showers.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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