Roehl Or Schneider

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Whip-Stock's Comment
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Any professional opinions offered on either would be appreciated." I have to make a choice next week..... I'm leaning toward Roehl for now but barely. Comfort is a big issue with me.. I know I'm not driving a rolling mansion but still......

Paul W.'s Comment
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Any professional opinions offered on either would be appreciated." I have to make a choice next week..... I'm leaning toward Roehl for now but barely. Comfort is a big issue with me.. I know I'm not driving a rolling mansion but still......

Hey, I'm new at this trucking lifestyle myself but the two companies I've been looking at are Roehl and TMC. Roehl has several flexible home time options, and they seem to have an outstanding safety record. That part from what I've been told can make a big difference in terms of being able to continously drive and not have to stop at so many weigh stations. Also I have two of my instructors drove or Roehl, one for flatbed division and the other for the dry van so I was able to get a lot of feedback on the company. Therected are quite a few great threads about driving for Roehl. One guy even posted his reports from when he actually started training with Roehl. He got his CDL from Roehl. Just look them up in the search bar. I'm hoping to start in about a week.

Schneider is a pretry good company as well but for me, later on down the road when I need it, the home time Roehl offers is unmatched by Schneider. Hope this helps.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Whip-Stock's Comment
member avatar
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Any professional opinions offered on either would be appreciated." I have to make a choice next week..... I'm leaning toward Roehl for now but barely. Comfort is a big issue with me.. I know I'm not driving a rolling mansion but still......

double-quotes-end.png

Hey, I'm new at this trucking lifestyle myself but the two companies I've been looking at are Roehl and TMC. Roehl has several flexible home time options, and they seem to have an outstanding safety record. That part from what I've been told can make a big difference in terms of being able to continously drive and not have to stop at so many weigh stations. Also I have two of my instructors drove or Roehl, one for flatbed division and the other for the dry van so I was able to get a lot of feedback on the company. Therected are quite a few great threads about driving for Roehl. One guy even posted his reports from when he actually started training with Roehl. He got his CDL from Roehl. Just look them up in the search bar. I'm hoping to start in about a week.

Schneider is a pretry good company as well but for me, later on down the road when I need it, the home time Roehl offers is unmatched by Schneider. Hope this helps.

Yea, it does help... Leaning more toward Roehl... Thanks for the info...

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Pick/Grin's Comment
member avatar

Roehl emphasizes safety and home time above anything else. I think they're great, I maintain a positive attitude and let them know that I'd like to hit a milestone as far as mileage goes. I get at least 450 miles a day, a week off of the time, and some of the dispatchers are really good people. Recent repairs to the truck really messed up my sleep schedule, a few days later they took note and set up loads so that I could resume my normal sleeping habits, and I was even able to recover some of that lost time with slightly longer loads. They know a lot of their drivers are new, many of which are simply not confident in themselves. The company sees this and they work them in a way so that they could be broken in and shown how things are to be done at an appropriate pace. Some of the guys complain about miles and locations and how slow the trucks are, but I don't mind any of that negativity. I'm treated well, they see that I'm working as hard as I can and being as safe as possible, and everyone wins. I cannot say much about Schneider as I don't know any drivers for them and have not spoken to any of their drivers. However, they are a starter company much like Roehl. A lot of these bigger companies didn't just magically appear, they have a reputation and massive fleets for a reason. I'm sure there's a lot of good to be said about Schneider as well.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Whip-Stock's Comment
member avatar

Roehl emphasizes safety and home time above anything else. I think they're great, I maintain a positive attitude and let them know that I'd like to hit a milestone as far as mileage goes. I get at least 450 miles a day, a week off of the time, and some of the dispatchers are really good people. Recent repairs to the truck really messed up my sleep schedule, a few days later they took note and set up loads so that I could resume my normal sleeping habits, and I was even able to recover some of that lost time with slightly longer loads. They know a lot of their drivers are new, many of which are simply not confident in themselves. The company sees this and they work them in a way so that they could be broken in and shown how things are to be done at an appropriate pace. Some of the guys complain about miles and locations and how slow the trucks are, but I don't mind any of that negativity. I'm treated well, they see that I'm working as hard as I can and being as safe as possible, and everyone wins. I cannot say much about Schneider as I don't know any drivers for them and have not spoken to any of their drivers. However, they are a starter company much like Roehl. A lot of these bigger companies didn't just magically appear, they have a reputation and massive fleets for a reason. I'm sure there's a lot of good to be said about Schneider as well.

Starting pay compared to Schneider? "I think" Schneider starts at only .28 cpm but raises within 90 days...

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Pick/Grin's Comment
member avatar

Roehl pays .32 starting with dry van , plus a little bonus for short haul and normal rates for dead heading. Detention pay is $10 an hour after waiting two hours. Not sure about layover as I've never had to wait for another assignment.

I believe reefer gets .02 extra, I'm unsure about flatbed. No speciality hauling like autos or livestock, tankers, doubles , or bellyloaders. Some terminals have daycabs.

Additionally, this company goes to great lengths to hire drivers. I live in PBC, an hour north of Miami. Despite being 5+ hours from the closest dropyard in Jax, they fly me into Chicago twice a month at no cost. That speaks to us South Floridians.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Raz's Comment
member avatar

I'm not trying to rain on the parade , but you guys need to call Schneider. If you have new cdl from private school they have Otr option of out 11 days/ in 3 starting at .34 cpm Orientation is only 17 days at $80 per day. And in some areas offering $5000 sign on bonus. That's a deal breaker for me

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Paul W.'s Comment
member avatar

I'm not trying to rain on the parade , but you guys need to call Schneider. If you have new cdl from private school they have Otr option of out 11 days/ in 3 starting at .34 cpm Orientation is only 17 days at $80 per day. And in some areas offering $5000 sign on bonus. That's a deal breaker for me

That $5000 bonus you're referring to is most likely only for otr drivers who have some experience and if they are offering it to new graduates, well, it'd be very far and few options like that. Roehl starts off at .32 but after 3 months it goes up to. 34 and then .36 after another 3 months. Flat bed starts off at .34 or.36 I think. The same thing applies though, after 3 months .02 raise. Roehl has much better home time flexibility that Schneider doesn't always offer. Schneider has tankers though if you wanted to go that route.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Paul W.'s Comment
member avatar

From what I've read and heard from other drivers who have been doing this for awhile now, most of the time it is all going to equal up to the same. Some companies may start you off at higher pay but then they don't have as many frequent pay raises as some other companies will. The biggest thing to me in deciding which company to work for comes down to the safety record, as I've been told that the better safety record a company has the less likely the driver will have to stop at a weigh station which means more money as you're not having to stop. Other thing is, what type of environment it is for the driver. You want a company that will treat it's employees like people and not numbers, with respect as long as the employees do their job they're expecting to do and so fourth. And then the next thing is the type of trucks. Schneider uses Freightliner which are not bad trucks but the company plans to automate their fleet very soon. I was taught to draw 10 speed and I'd like to continue driving nothing less. Haha

Whip-Stock's Comment
member avatar

From what I've read and heard from other drivers who have been doing this for awhile now, most of the time it is all going to equal up to the same. Some companies may start you off at higher pay but then they don't have as many frequent pay raises as some other companies will. The biggest thing to me in deciding which company to work for comes down to the safety record, as I've been told that the better safety record a company has the less likely the driver will have to stop at a weigh station which means more money as you're not having to stop. Other thing is, what type of environment it is for the driver. You want a company that will treat it's employees like people and not numbers, with respect as long as the employees do their job they're expecting to do and so fourth. And then the next thing is the type of trucks. Schneider uses Freightliner which are not bad trucks but the company plans to automate their fleet very soon. I was taught to draw 10 speed and I'd like to continue driving nothing less. Haha

Schneider does offer 5000 dollar sign on bonus to new drivers and 7500 to experienced drivers but both are paid over a period of time. I understand schneiders trucks are a heap but as a newbie I can't expect one off the showroom floor. Still a hard choice.

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