Coming To A Stop Tips.

Topic 1804 | Page 1

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Eric P.'s Comment
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So I've been been out driving a couple of times and as I'm only taking weekend classes I have alot of time to criticize what I do wrong. Mostly according to my teachers. I go "too deep" on the clutch when shifting and I coast to long. AGH! I feel like whenever I'm coming to a stop I'm about to stall the truck.

It's easy enough to stop going to deep on the clutch by just shifting my seat back a bit more but, I suppose my question is how can you come to a complete stop while in gear without excessive coasting?

For example I'll be in 8th gear coming up to a red light. I take my foot off the fuel pedal ( leaving the truck in gear ) and slowly depress the brake pedal. But, before I can get to the red light the truck is down to about 500 rpm and feels like it's lugging and wants to stall so I push the clutch in and coast the rest of the way up... Is it just suppose to feel that way?

Dave D.'s Comment
member avatar

So I've been been out driving a couple of times and as I'm only taking weekend classes I have alot of time to criticize what I do wrong. Mostly according to my teachers. I go "too deep" on the clutch when shifting and I coast to long. AGH! I feel like whenever I'm coming to a stop I'm about to stall the truck.

It's easy enough to stop going to deep on the clutch by just shifting my seat back a bit more but, I suppose my question is how can you come to a complete stop while in gear without excessive coasting?

For example I'll be in 8th gear coming up to a red light. I take my foot off the fuel pedal ( leaving the truck in gear ) and slowly depress the brake pedal. But, before I can get to the red light the truck is down to about 500 rpm and feels like it's lugging and wants to stall so I push the clutch in and coast the rest of the way up... Is it just suppose to feel that way?

you can get around most of the "lugging" by down shifting to 5th gear you should be able to get it down to about 5mph of less before it'll stall on you, you just need to get to the light in a lower gear, that should fix it for you.

Gerald H. AKA Doc's Comment
member avatar

welcome Eric, as far as gong to deep, these trucks only need to have the clutch pedal depressed about 1 1/2 inches to get them to shift right. if you are going to deep you are activating the clutch brake and if that's the case it will never shift right while it's moving. these trucks can be shifted without the clutch at the right RPMs but that's not till later on with more experience. As far as stopping, I would try to go to a lower gear if you feel the truck is lugging. just start downshifting a little sooner to give your self more time to get into a lower gear. if you coast longer then the length of the tractor and trailer it's considered not being in control and you could fail your driving test for that. It takes some time getting used to it but you can do it. it just takes practice. Doc

Eric P.'s Comment
member avatar

Yeah. I've already felt how to float the gears between 2-3. I mean I go through the motions of double clutching but, half the time it's slipped into 3rd before I'm really pressing the clutch the 2nd time around.

Float The Gears:

An expression used to describe someone who is shifting gears without using the clutch at all. Drivers are taught to "Double Clutch" or press and release the clutch twice for each gear shift. If you're floating gears it means you're simply shifting without using the clutch at all.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Double Clutching:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Starcar's Comment
member avatar

You can move your seat back...but remember...you still need to be able to put that brake pedal CLEAR TO THE FLOOR, in a emergency situation. Its better to "train your leg" on the clutch. I was taught to down shift when coming to a stop...always. And its something that you will need to learn very well, in order to pass your final driving test. So you might as well learn it now. It is a great safety feature, and will serve you well in your trucking career.....good luck.

Tim L.'s Comment
member avatar

I too suffered problems coming to a stop and downshifting when I first began driving a truck. What I found out is that you must give yourself more time to slow down and downshift. I think at least for me it was just being used to driving cars. If you don't start your slow down considerably sooner driving a truck, you will find that you just don't have time to get down to fifth gear. You will be rushing trying to do it, and that makes for problems. Simply begin your stopping process sooner than you might think is necessary, and it becomes much easier. BTW, don't worry about what the bozos behind you might think. LOL.

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