Concerned About Mechanicals

Topic 3077 | Page 1

Page 1 of 1
Deb R.'s Comment
member avatar

As I go through the CDL Training Materials here, the things that trip me up are always the mechanical items. I do not have a mechanical background; for instance, I would be guessing if I had to point out the alternator. Will I be able to identify a leaky shock absorber? How will I know if the brakes look bad, if I don't know what good ones look like? I am planning to attend a state technical school in the fall, and assume that these things will be covered. I'm really handy, and I can learn, so I guess I'm looking for some moral support here. This really is the only area that concerns me.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Dorian A.'s Comment
member avatar

As I go through the CDL Training Materials here, the things that trip me up are always the mechanical items. I do not have a mechanical background; for instance, I would be guessing if I had to point out the alternator. Will I be able to identify a leaky shock absorber? How will I know if the brakes look bad, if I don't know what good ones look like? I am planning to attend a state technical school in the fall, and assume that these things will be covered. I'm really handy, and I can learn, so I guess I'm looking for some moral support here. This really is the only area that concerns me.

Well, I sure don't have an answer but I can tell you I am in the same boat LOL.. I have been going through the training course on this site, and I am like 'What the heck is THAT?' on about everything. So I too hope they go over this stuff as if you have no knowledge. I figure if I practice the written part now & get that down pat, when I get to school I can then focus all my attention on the truck & learning it & learning to drive it- knowing I have the written learned (even if I don't know yet what the parts refer to- I know the answers! lol!) Good Luck to both of us! good-luck.gif

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Deb R.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks, Dorian! It really helps to know that I am not the only one "in the dark" about some of the mechanicals. Btw, I'm a tree-hugger too.

Serah D.'s Comment
member avatar

Hi, lol..am on the same boat. But I have found that besides whats on the cdl manual, and to give myself a head start, I google a) parts of a rig's engine, brake system etc. You will be surprised how much info you can get. Good luck!!!!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
RedGator's Comment
member avatar

Your school will teach you to do a thorough pretrip. All you are really required to know is if things are properly mounted and secured, no breaks, cracks and dry rot on belts. Im not mechanical in the least. You will be just fine. Dont sweat the small stuff.

Starcar's Comment
member avatar

Well. I'm very mechanically inclined...My dad was a mechanic, and I was his only "son"..dancing.gif .But I just went to www.youtube.com...and typed in pretrip inspection of a semi truck...theres a hug amount of video for that !!!dancing-banana.gif When I know nothing about something, I learn best by watching it done, before I try doing it myself !!! so give that a try...it may help...and its free !!!!good-luck.gif Maybe this is something that needs to get on the general forum...I"m surprised one of the newbies over there hasn't googled it up...Great to know women can still out thing the guys !!! rofl-1.gif but then, we all know they don't take directions well..rofl-3.gif

Starcar's Comment
member avatar

Uhhh.. that should read "out thinK the guys"......they are the ones with the "things"...

nomad girl's Comment
member avatar

I think if you are interested, hang around the mechanics and just ask them what they're doing as you will soon find out, they love talking. i've learned a lot just hanging around them when they're fixing my car. and i'm pretty sure, if given the chance, the mechanics working on the semis wouldn't mind sharing some knowledge with you. sometimes, just knowing how it all comes together gives you a better peace of mind.

but like redgator mentioned, the school will teach you what you need to know so don't sweat the small stuff. you really can't tell if your brakes look bad without taking everything apart to see if it's the brake pad, the rotor, or something else. but, you can hear/feel it if your brakes isn't working properly, and then have someone look at it.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Boots&Bludog's Comment
member avatar

Deb, I also am not mechanically inclined but what I am learning is I don't need to BE the mechanic I just need to identify the issues. Redgator nails it when she says you will be taught. So much of what you learn will make more sense once you get in school and are more "hands on." I am just starting and just today the parts are starting to come a little more in focus as in they all don't look the same, haha. Seriously though you will get a chance to go over and over it and it really does have a bit of a flow and a LOT of it is repetitive so it starts to sink in with practice. I also stress to keep plugging away on this site with all the valuable information and support. Cheers to us treehuggers! ;-)

Starcar's Comment
member avatar

Trying to recognize the pieces and parts of a diesel engine LOOK daunting....But an engine is an engine...they all have the same pieces, as a rule. All you have to do is learn to recognize them, so you can see that they are in good condition, and safe. There are a few ways to study the Pre trip on this site..and there are even downloadable flash cards !!!! I'll try to find some links...but I"m tech stupid, so bear with me. I drive truck like a champ.....techy stuff.....not so much.

Page 1 of 1

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More