May Trucking?

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John P.'s Comment
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Anyone out there work for May Trucking? I'm starting driving school on Tuesday, so I'm already applying to several companies to check them out. Please let me know if you have any information. It is seeming more and more like it doesn't matter too much where you go to get your first year in as long as it's a stable company with good freight opportunities.

Chris L.'s Comment
member avatar

I was considering may trucking, I think they are good the only reason I didn't go with them was due to there strict idle policy. You have to decide what is important to you. They have 48 state reefer division or western 11 dry van , pet and rider policy.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

John P.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks Chris! I got some pretty good information on them from a recruiter that was paid by salary and had been a trucker for the last 22 years. She said you can idle all you want to me yesterday even in CA where we have very strict idling rules because all their vehicles are 2011 or newer with new emissions so hopefully she was telling us the truth about that. What info did you get from them about idling?

I really did like the option to run 11 states or 48. Cause let's face it I don't know sh**t yet about driving on the east coast (or west coast for that matter!rofl-3.gif ) and may find that I don't like it even though my adventurous side is telling me to go for it. Plus, the 90 Day Flat Rate option is a pretty good deal for new drivers that are still green and can't produce the same miles a day as an experienced driver and they give you the difference if you would have made more at your solo rate.

My two concerns are the lower CPM at .30 per mile to start (Is that average? Low or High? Anyone? please chime in...)

and I am still thinking about flat bedding which they don't do...

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Chris L.'s Comment
member avatar

Maybe you can get a current May driver to chime in I'm only going on what the recruiter told me. Her name is Rebecca at the Brooks Oregon terminal. As far as starting pay I think they are average for that. I'm currently starting with Primes flatbed division, if your looking into flatbed I like my experiences with Prime so far. Except I got a bad trainer but beyond that it's been good. Prime trucks have APU's and inverters in all their trucks, pretty nice comfort features.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

APU's:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

John P.'s Comment
member avatar

Maybe you can get a current May driver to chime in I'm only going on what the recruiter told me. Her name is Rebecca at the Brooks Oregon terminal. As far as starting pay I think they are average for that. I'm currently starting with Primes flatbed division, if your looking into flatbed I like my experiences with Prime so far. Except I got a bad trainer but beyond that it's been good. Prime trucks have APU's and inverters in all their trucks, pretty nice comfort features.

How does the pay stack up against hauling dry van or reefer?

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

APU's:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

Chris L.'s Comment
member avatar

You would have to talk to recruiters about pay for different companies and divisions. As far as Prime the best pay for a driver starting out is to drive a lightweight truck in the reefer division. They pay you an extra .05 cents per mile to drive a lightweight truck. Flatbed division uses full size trucks. I believe it's .42 cpm for the lightweight truck but I could be off by a cent or two. The lightweight trucks are lighter and smaller so you can haul more weight in the trailer. The sleeper is also smaller than a full size truck.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

John P.'s Comment
member avatar

You would have to talk to recruiters about pay for different companies and divisions. As far as Prime the best pay for a driver starting out is to drive a lightweight truck in the reefer division. They pay you an extra .05 cents per mile to drive a lightweight truck. Flatbed division uses full size trucks. I believe it's .42 cpm for the lightweight truck but I could be off by a cent or two. The lightweight trucks are lighter and smaller so you can haul more weight in the trailer. The sleeper is also smaller than a full size truck.

Ok good to know, Thanks!

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Starcar's Comment
member avatar

John, even tho its nice to stay in a region you know...unless you want to stay in that region for the rest of your trucking life, you will need to get REAL OTR experience...which is basically driving all lower 48 states. If you can drive CA, and not go postal, you can drive anywhere....after all...its a asphalt !!!

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

John P.'s Comment
member avatar

John, even tho its nice to stay in a region you know...unless you want to stay in that region for the rest of your trucking life, you will need to get REAL OTR experience...which is basically driving all lower 48 states. If you can drive CA, and not go postal, you can drive anywhere....after all...its a asphalt !!!

Baaahaahaaa! rofl-2.gif Great point! rofl-3.gif Part of the reason I like the idea of going OTR is BECAUSE of CA! smile.gif

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Tracy M.'s Comment
member avatar

May pays .32 by the end of your first year and they do have an idle policy effects your fuel consumption and the dock you, I have a friend that drives for May their reefer div likes them, he has a dog so the idle policy does not affect him. I would have gone with May as they pay better than some, but no female trainer for at least a month, so I went with Werner they pay .25cents to start and finish at .29 at the end of 12 months, they allow pets and have a rider policy, they run dry, reefer and flat. Told you get to take the truck home if not in a terminal range. Will know more after next Wednesday headed for orientation. Will let you know. Look at System, Melton or TMC they are flat bedders, no pets though. Have a great time in school

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

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