DALLAS ,Texas Newbie Need Help :)

Topic 4504 | Page 1

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TIMOTHY S.'s Comment
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What's better to do? Get my cdl or just go off to a school? And if I get my own cdl who will hire me after? Which school is best?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Kody S.'s Comment
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In my opinion, keep the word opinion in mind, I believe schooling is the best route. Yes, takes a little more time, money, and work, but I believe it is the best way in finding a job too. A lot of companies I've done my own research on LOVE IT if you went through and completed schooling.

Dustan J.'s Comment
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I live near Austin. I wanted to go through the local truck driving school ran by a guy out of Abilene. As it turns out, during my immediate time right out of the Army I didn't get to go. Now I'm going up to Dallas to go through C.R. England's course to drive with them. I know, I've heard all the negatives about them (low pay, etc) but I gotta do what I gotta do. All I did is apply and I immediately got a call back to go up there and train. Looking back, I wish I could have made things work out to where I could go through the month-long school and learn the trucks better. Now I will have to rely on my trainer to be squared away and teach me correctly. Of course, I will be on here checking facts and getting tips from all the veterans and pros out there.

Timothy S., check into a company called Action Career Training. They are a Texas based trucking school that runs about 30 days long. When I went and talked to the instructor he described the course as being a LOT of wheel time so that you will not only pass, but be a decent driver too.

Brad S.'s Comment
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What's better to do? Get my cdl or just go off to a school? And if I get my own cdl who will hire me after? Which school is best?

check out Millis Transport in Burleson, TX. - Of what I have researched and employee reviews seems like a good school. But look at a few before deciding.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Andre G.'s Comment
member avatar

I live near Austin. I wanted to go through the local truck driving school ran by a guy out of Abilene. As it turns out, during my immediate time right out of the Army I didn't get to go. Now I'm going up to Dallas to go through C.R. England's course to drive with them. I know, I've heard all the negatives about them (low pay, etc) but I gotta do what I gotta do. All I did is apply and I immediately got a call back to go up there and train. Looking back, I wish I could have made things work out to where I could go through the month-long school and learn the trucks better. Now I will have to rely on my trainer to be squared away and teach me correctly. Of course, I will be on here checking facts and getting tips from all the veterans and pros out there.

Timothy S., check into a company called Action Career Training. They are a Texas based trucking school that runs about 30 days long. When I went and talked to the instructor he described the course as being a LOT of wheel time so that you will not only pass, but be a decent driver too.

Hello I'm also out of Dallas tx and wanting to know how is it going for you here at CR? Any advice you could offer? KLLM in Ft Worth?

Kai's Comment
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Here you can search for school in your area that are approved by Werner Enterprises: http://www.werner.com/content/drivers/driver_opportunities/student_driver_program.cfm

Both options: Company-Sponsored School and Truck Driving Schools are good.

Good company-sponsored schools in the Dallas area are Stevens Driving Academy in Mesquite, TX and FFE/KLLM Academy in Forth Worth, Tx. FFE Academy in Forth Worth pay for breakfast and dinner (Black Eyed Peas). KLLM Academy in Richland/Jackson, MS also offer breakfast and lunch.

From all the schools of C R England, the one in Dallas/Cedar Hill has the worst reviews. If you choose C R England, you better go to either Burns Harbor, IN or West Valley City, UT. The one in Fontana seems to be the best, but I think they are only accepting students from California. The one in West Valley City is good, but stressy according to reviews, because there may be more that 200 students in one class.

If you go to a Truck Driving School, be sure that this school is approved by companies that you apply for and inform yourself what employers are willing to reimburse. Werner Enterprises for example reimburses up to $6000.

Also check Averitt Express various Driver Training Programs: http://www.averittcareers.com/training.html

The front page is a little outdated. If you want to more updated information:

1. Click on the Map Thumbnail 2. Then click Texas 3. Then click Grand Prairie, Tx 4. Look for Student Training Program or Flex Student Training Program. The Refresher and Supplementary Training Programs are for experienced who did not drive for a long time. 5. You can find Dedicated Student/Supply Chain Training Program, Student Flex Training Program, and Regional Student Training Programs in your area. These are for Recent Graduates. Click for more updated information. Averitt Express reimburses $1500 tuition after you complete 6 months with them. However, their training pay is pretty high compared to other companies. Regional Student Drivers receive a flat rate of $600 per week while Dedicated/Supply Chain Student Drivers/Apprentices receive a flat rate of $500 to $600 per week.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Kai's Comment
member avatar

Also check Quality School. Quality Companies is a subdivision of Celadon. They just open a new school in Laredo, TX.

Andre G.'s Comment
member avatar

Also check Quality School. Quality Companies is a subdivision of Celadon. They just open a new school in Laredo, TX.

Hey there thanks. Ill look into them as well. I got a call from swift today so I have to contact them back in the am. I'm leaning towards KLLM in ft worth but I wish I could do a private school so I won't be tied down for a year or so. My goal is to purchases my own truck although most say no. I know ppl making good money having their own truck. Will keep praying and decide. I wanna start by 2nd/3rd week in September.

How'd things go for you today?

Wine Taster's Comment
member avatar

Well, just to toss this out there.... there are many really good company sponsored schools out there. There are advantages and disadvantages to the different schools. By going through a non company sponsored school, you have to put a lot of cash out of pocket. You may get it reimbursed after you get hired over many months. You will not make any more money either way. You will still have to go out with a trainer for the company you choose after school either way. Many of the company sponsored schools will pay for your trip to the school. I started with Roehl. It was a great school and they have treated me great. Just don't want you to discount company sponsored training with out researching them as well.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Andre G.'s Comment
member avatar

Well, just to toss this out there.... there are many really good company sponsored schools out there. There are advantages and disadvantages to the different schools. By going through a non company sponsored school, you have to put a lot of cash out of pocket. You may get it reimbursed after you get hired over many months. You will not make any more money either way. You will still have to go out with a trainer for the company you choose after school either way. Many of the company sponsored schools will pay for your trip to the school. I started with Roehl. It was a great school and they have treated me great. Just don't want you to discount company sponsored training with out researching them as well.

Great stuff. I appreciate that. Each time I lean one way I hear from someone else to go the other lol. I was thinking private so I can go to whatever company I want but I don't just have that kind of cash laying around. So looks like school will be it for me. I def appreciate everyone's opinions. Decisions decisions decisions.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

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