Can A Truck Driver Take 'Vivanse" For ADD If The Doctor Gives A Prescription For The Drug?

Topic 4632 | Page 1

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James F.'s Comment
member avatar

Is it ok to take this med if the doctor prescribes it. Also the doctor gives a note to carry in your wallet.

Mike H.'s Comment
member avatar

Vyvanse is an Amphetamine type medication. It can cause heart and blood pressure problems. It can cause dizziness, restlessness and trouble sleeping. Its precautions include not driving or operating any machinery.

Have you taken your DOT physical yet? I'm pretty sure, although a DOT medical examiner will tell you for sure, that you wont be able to drive a CMV while taking this drug.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards
Weatherman's Comment
member avatar

I have ADHD and recently completed my physical and received my DOT medical card from Roehl. Here is what you need to do if you are on an ADHD med.

First, Go see your doctor to determine if you can safely operate a commercial vehicle to while on your medication. If you and your doctor determine that it is safe to be on you medication you MUST have your doctor write a letter stating that it is safe to drive while on your medication. Do not stop taking your meds just to get into truck driving, if for some reason you decide to quit your medication you will still need a letter from your doctor stating that it is safe to drive while not taking your medication (I am not kidding about this). Bottom line: you will need a letter from your physician before taking your DOT physical. Make sure the letter also includes your doctor's contact information. Also bring the medication with you to the physical in its original bottle. I discussed this topic with my companies DOT physician and she only knows of one company that will not hire those taking ADHD medication (specifically Adderall). There might be a couple places out there that will not hire you because of your medication, but you should have no problem finding a good company to work for if you take the proper steps and have the documentation to back it up.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
mountain girl's Comment
member avatar

What Weatherman said.

For those who truly have ADHD, Adderall or Vyvanse prescribed for that purpose, is not only acceptable but necessary for safe driving. A person who has ADHD is 80% more likely to have a car accident without his prescribed medication than with. Those who abuse the medication by taking it without indication for it, are the most likely to experience the stereotypical negative side effects, such as dizziness, restlessness, or difficulty sleeping. For those who understand how well it works, the true patient will feel sharp and alert, more calm, and will sleep better. Inform whoever is giving you the drug test, whether it be a physician's office or any testing facility, at the time you are taking the drug test, exactly which medications you are on and what dose, so they can annotate it directly on the drug test paperwork. Depending on the amount of money a company wants to spend on these tests, there are more sensitive ones that can determine exactly what type of medication you are on and the concentration. In other words, it used to be that labs could not distinguish between illicit methamphetamine and Vyvanse or Adderall, so when those taking prescribed medications took these tests, it appeared they were on meth. This is no longer the case. If they want to spend the money, examiners can tell what your medication is. So when you tell them what you're taking and they know what to expect, your labs come up negative. The medical examiner may even give you a call to verify your dosages and ask for your doctor's or even your pharmacy's contact information or phone number, just to be sure. Be honest and up-front. Even with this call though, your test should be negative.

While these medications are methamphetamine relatives, they are not considered to be methamphetamine-type medications. They are dextro-amphetamines which, unlike illicit meth, are salt-based compounds and have extremely different effects or results for the patient. If you truly have ADHD and the medication works for you, follow exactly what Weatherman said. While it is true that these medications may impair one's ability to drive or to operate machinery, that type of negative side-effect is more likely to result when someone is abusing the drug just to stay awake for longer hours, doesn't need it, and shouldn't be taking it in the first place; and is more unlikely when prescribed properly, than most would believe. In fact, the opposite is actually be true. The ADHD patient will have very satisfactory results with a much keener focus and attention to detail than without. I'm sure this is something you've experienced. It is also not very well known that many physicians prescribe Adderall to patients with sleep disorders and some ADHD patients have claimed that the medication helps keep them alert when they take it and lets them sleep better once it wears off. Once you have your medical card there is nothing written on it that states what your medical condition(s) you have regarding ADHD or whether or not you take anything for it, however, it's still an excellent idea to keep that statement from your physician with you as backup.

The one thing I would caution you to be aware of, is that for some, the half-hour or so it takes for the medication to finally wear off, at the end of the day - the rebound period - is most risky, because your body's physiology is adjusting to returning to its pre-medicated state and your senses might be quite dulled, you might feel very tired, you might feel dizzy, all of the above, any combination, or none at all. Those who've already been taking their medication for a while, either don't feel this "drop-off" anymore or are aware of what's going on when it happens. Scheduling your dosage time properly with this rebound period as one in which you take a break from driving or simply go to bed would be very wise. Vyvanse is one of the best medications out there when used for the purpose it was intended and the extended release version seems to have a much smoother or unnoticeable rebound than any of the others. As far as risk to your cardiovascular system, there is a known risk to hypertension and tachycardia, however, for most who are otherwise healthy, their systems return to normal, once the medication wears off. Those who have an extended QT segment (known or otherwise) in their sinus rhythm are at risk for complications once the medication is added to the equation and in those cases, physicians should take all appropriate precautions, monitoring these patients or even finding an alternative remedy or prescription.

Good luck. You'll do great. Keep taking the medication you've been prescribed. It is possible to pass the DOT physical and find a job as a driver, while taking properly prescribed ADHD medication.

-mountain girl

good-luck.gif

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Hypertension:

Abnormally high blood pressure.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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