First Week And HOS Headaches

Topic 19596 | Page 2

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Susan D. 's Comment
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Absolutely go off duty when you're not driving. You have that 3 hours of cushion between your 11 hours of driving and your 14 hour clock that's going to cover your 30 min break and the time you take finding your loaded trailer, checking in/out etc.

Personally, I show: 7 min check-in (on a live load or unload), 15 mins for a drop and hook (no check-in time), and a 7 minute pretrip. THAT'S IT. I was taught to log this way. We need every spare minute we can squeeze.

While I'm not a home daily dedicated driver like a few here, I'm OTR , my company specializes in shorter Regional hauls for the most part and we tend to run out our clock daily with several shorter trips and sometimes a single run that will take your entire clock to complete. Because I'm what we call network fleet (I run everywhere the company goes) I sometimes get slightly longer runs, however like Thursday I had to play in Chicago most of the day, and yesterday I was running around Nashville, before heading home. Yayy home. I try to sleep as close to a receiver as possible, allowing me to not start my clock until AFTER I'm unloaded (or loaded) and ready to roll out. In that case, I'll show a 15 min pretrip/unloading (or loading) and roll.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Susan wrote:

You have that 3 hours of cushion between your 11 hours of driving and your 14 hour clock that's going to cover your 30 min break and the time you take finding your loaded trailer, checking in/out etc

Exactly what I tried to point out in my original reply. The above train of thought definitely applies to OTR type jobs, but not necessarily for the type of job (intermodal) the OP has and I have with multiple stops and pickups that increase the chance for delays.

This type of work quickly exhausts the 14 hour on-duty clock, to the point it catches up with the drive clock and reduces available drive time. As a result clock management at the micro level becomes necessary and is part of the challenge he is working through.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

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