First Truck, It Has Bed Bugs

Topic 20725 | Page 3

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Matthew K.'s Comment
member avatar

So, the chemical worked... for about 3 days. They're back, and I can already tell they're repopulating. I'm calling my dispatcher as soon as he gets in this morning, telling him after I drop my current load I'm coming back to Columbus (150 miles from drop) to wash all my stuff (again) and get a different truck.

Oh how naive I was, to believe the problem was over.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
MyNameGoesHere's Comment
member avatar

Might take longer than 3 days. Young bed bugs need to feed everyday. Those were probably killed off. Adults feed about every 3 days. That is probably what you're seeing.

I still recommend a new truck, just on the basis that it's not a quick process to get rid of them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Mikey W.'s Comment
member avatar

Sorry to hear you went through that. It sounds like you still have a great attitude compared to what many would probably have.

There are lots of really dirty people out here and I have yet to figure out why. I keep my truck really clean inside and out and organized and I feel it not only improves my morale but also my efficiency as I'm organized

Matthew K.'s Comment
member avatar

I'm "smoke coming out of my ears" ****ed off. I just hide it really well.

It doesnt help that I found out that once you encounter them, they piggyback along with you and can take like 6 months to finally rid yourself of them.

Steak Eater's Comment
member avatar

From another thread :

I'm twiddling my thumbs in Columbus waiting on my truck to be rid of bed bugs,

They still have you in the same truck?

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Matthew are you documenting the number of times your truck has been "treated" using the freeform text available on your QualComm? I think this is round 3 of extermination, correct? If you haven't been doing so, please document this. Although I am not a proponent of unnecessarily blasting a company, especially the one I happily work for, but I gotta be honest, this borders on ridiculous. In my mind, continued co-existence with these pests is robbing you of sleep (a safety issue), adding unnecessary stress (again a potential safety issue), and clearly your ability to make a decent income due to all the accumulated wait time for superficial extermination (which according to our Forum's BugMan, is only temporary). Although BB's don't spread disease, worst case you could develop a serous allergy to the bites, making you sick.

Try to get someone's attention with the authority to take you off that "science project" of a truck and into a healthier environment. Starting with your DM , try to work your way up from there, if need be to the terminal manager using your DM as an advocate (he ain't making a dime on you as you partake in the Orkin commercials). Choose your words wisely, be tactful and professional but make it known your desire to be removed from that truck; "it's negatively effecting my ability to be productive for the company, impacting my "rookie" progress, and compromising quality rest which is a potential safety issue.". Use of the word "safety" should get their attention. Stick to the facts and try to keep your cool. Document the issue as needed using freeform text on the QC; every time the offending critters reappear (which they will), every time you are waiting for extermination (including duration of down-time), the frequency of par-boiling your clothes, and also how it is affecting your ability to get quality rest (a safety issue).

I am probably the biggest rah-rah on here about Swift; but in this situation I am rather disappointed in their ability to effectively address a problem you clearly did not create and unfortunately seems like you must jump-up-and-down on someone's desk to get fixed.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Matthew K.'s Comment
member avatar

Matthew are you documenting the number of times your truck has been "treated" using the freeform text available on your QualComm? I think this is round 3 of extermination, correct? If you haven't been doing so, please document this. Although I am not a proponent of unnecessarily blasting a company, especially the one I happily work for, but I gotta be honest, this borders on ridiculous. In my mind, continued co-existence with these pests is robbing you of sleep (a safety issue), adding unnecessary stress (again a potential safety issue), and clearly your ability to make a decent income due to all the accumulated wait time for superficial extermination (which according to our Forum's BugMan, is only temporary). Although BB's don't spread disease, worst case you could develop a serous allergy to the bites, making you sick.

Try to get someone's attention with the authority to take you off that "science project" of a truck and into a healthier environment. Starting with your DM , try to work your way up from there, if need be to the terminal manager using your DM as an advocate (he ain't making a dime on you as you partake in the Orkin commercials). Choose your words wisely, be tactful and professional but make it known your desire to be removed from that truck; "it's negatively effecting my ability to be productive for the company, impacting my "rookie" progress, and compromising quality rest which is a potential safety issue.". Use of the word "safety" should get their attention. Stick to the facts and try to keep your cool. Document the issue as needed using freeform text on the QC; every time the offending critters reappear (which they will), every time you are waiting for extermination (including duration of down-time), the frequency of par-boiling your clothes, and also how it is affecting your ability to get quality rest (a safety issue).

I am probably the biggest rah-rah on here about Swift; but in this situation I am rather disappointed in their ability to effectively address a problem you clearly did not create and unfortunately seems like you must jump-up-and-down on someone's desk to get fixed.

When I get into the terminal tomorrow, I'm going to have a chat with my DM. Hopefully I dont forget anything you said G-Town, but to be honest I'll probably read your post directly off of my phone, or even show it to him. I can't live like this. I'm covered in itchy red bumps, literally everywhere, including my hands and feet. I'm sleeping like ****, even in hotels (sheets rubbing on the bites), and my nerves are starting to fray, making me more frustrated and angry every day.

Also, Schneider, not Swift.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Sorry Matthew...for some reason I though you were with Swift. I apologize. Regardless I think you have a good plan.

I sincerely hope it works out for you.

MyNameGoesHere's Comment
member avatar

Sorry, with the academy and everything I haven't really had a lot of sit down time to finish my thread. I'm free until I need to head back Sunday, so I'll try and just finish it tomorrow.

Don't worry about transferring them. Don't wear the clothes you slept in to the other rooms. Bag everything (especially cloth) that you take out of there and don't remove from bags until it's been washed and or dried on high heat. Anything not fabric such as containers just make sure you give a thorough inspection, especially corners and tight spaces.

Best of luck to you and hopefully your company can get your situation resolved.

Matthew K.'s Comment
member avatar

Sorry Matthew...for some reason I though you were with Swift. I apologize. Regardless I think you have a good plan.

I sincerely hope it works out for you.

My DM was much more receptive than I thought he would be. At first, he still seemed to think there was a chance of me taking the same truck, but after I took a look at it, I just said I wouldn't be comfortable (mentally) using it. Since he didn't have any trucks available, I asked to go home for the weekend (3 hour drive, had my personal car though due to rental mix up from when I first came out) and he agreed. He called me less than an hour away, found a truck in Gary, IN. I told him I still wanted to spend the weekend at home, and he was totally fine with that.

I got to Gary at 2am on Tuesday in a rental, went to sleep at 4 (maintenance had to pick the lock, keys were inside and the machine at driver services wouldn't cut a new one properly), and woke up at 11 to have the truck cleaned out and move myself in.

Spending another night at the yard, weekly new driver call at 1030 tomorrow, then I hope I'm ready to roll out. I miss the road. I'm ready to get moving :)

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
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