TruckingTruth logo

LTL Trucking - My linehaul job

Topic 4501 | Page 7

Page 7 of 34 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:
AJ D.'s Comment
member avatar

Just making sure I'm learning this correctly...

LTL - Less than truck load....

L / H - Line Haul ....... terminal to terminal

P $ D ..... Pick up and delivery .....

correct?

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Line Haul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
guyjax(Guy Hodges)'s Comment
member avatar

Just making sure I'm learning this correctly...

LTL - Less than truck load....

L / H - Line Haul ....... terminal to terminal

P $ D ..... Pick up and delivery .....

correct?

Yes that would be correct.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Line Haul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

Just checking in. I'll have to leave my commentary on this thread for the two days I have off. This past two day stretch I spent entirely with my family. So far I'm loving my new job. I'm already getting used to pulling doubles - just can't back them up so always gotta remember to park in situations where I can pull through! And backing up a single pup trailer or a dolly? They move/turn VERY fast, much faster than a 53' trailer. Just getting acclimated to new job. One week of training down, 3 to go. I'll be able to write more as I go.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

This has been an awesome thread! Can't thank you enough 6 String Rhythym! Like Guyjax mentioned, LTL used to be experienced drivers only for the most part so we've hardly covered it over the years. It's only the past few years you're starting to hear more and more about new drivers getting opportunities.

ABF does not have enough drivers to cover the freight and the union does not have anymore drivers to send so between ABF and the union they opened up a 5 years contract for outside companies to haul freight.

I'd say ABF can get plenty of people to take those high paying union jobs. I think they can make more money acting as a broker and sending the cheap freight to outside companies while hauling the better paying freight themselves.

Not to mention I'm sure they've told the union, "Unless you want to eliminate the last few remaining union trucking companies in the U.S. you need to make sure we can stay in business."

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
guyjax(Guy Hodges)'s Comment
member avatar
I'd say ABF can get plenty of people to take those high paying union jobs. I think they can make more money acting as a broker and sending the cheap freight to outside companies while hauling the better paying freight themselves.

Not true Brett. There are advertising everywhere hiring new drivers, experienced or nor, the problem is with ABF. According to the people I have asked ABF is now to having to ask for outside help and just recently started trying to hiring from the schools. The problem is they have to put people through there training also and that takes time.

People that have experience are scared of doubles because they have seen them driven badly in the past and feel that's how they all are not knowing that it's the driver causing the wiggling of the trailers. Not the trailers themselves. Mainly it's bad advertising that is causing the issue.

I know, cause I asked, that ABF drivers make .53 cpm and currently the rate is set by the union at $22 an hour for hourly pay. That's a huge pay package but has anyone heard anything about it? No.

There is freight sitting on the docks waiting to leave and they end up going out a day late cause there is not enough drivers to haul the freight due to the sheer amount of freight coming in.

It's becoming more common to hear that the recruiters are quiting because pressure is being put on them to bring new drivers in but Union being Union they have to give the recruiters permission to harvest from the schools and receiving the permission can be a very slow process.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

It still doesn't make sense. Why would a well-established company with a huge pay package, a union behind you, and great home time have trouble bringing in drivers when companies that pay literally half of that and keep you out one or two months at a time bring in all the drivers they need?

If ABF can't get enough drivers then something is definitely wrong somewhere. Those jobs used to have a waiting list of several years before you could get on a full time board. They still have the best pay, benefits, home time, and job security in the industry. So the idea that suddenly they can't find enough drivers, even in our lackluster economy, doesn't make sense. Do the math - it doesn't add up. There's more to this.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
guyjax(Guy Hodges)'s Comment
member avatar

You are correct. There is more to it. But for the life of me I don't know what it is. ABF is crawling with outside carriers now. I have seen every large company on their yards except Swift and Schneider. Maybe it's the first step in pushing the union out? I don't know. But the fact is outside carriers are hauling more and more of ABF freight.

Well before a few years ago the biggest LTL company out there, YRC, was thought to be doing well. Not any more. Maybe a power struggle is taking place behind the scenes. Who knows. But what I do know is we are running close to 7000 miles each week and there seems to be no shortage of loads.

So why aren't they advertising? Why are they depending on outsHide carriers to do a job that they themselves could do up to this point? Cheaper work force could be it. If it is a cheaper work force ABF is looking for then I forsee the union days as being numbered.

Here is something to think about. What if ABF can get enough outside carriers in the mix and on stand by so when the next contract negotiations take place the union can not hold a work stoppage over ABF's head which would essentially make the union powerless and ABF either gets a contract more in their favor or shuts the union out completely by not renewing the contract?

I am just talking here but your right. It does not make sense to anyone that can think for themselves and knows a little about how trucking and how the unions work. Time will tell I guess but for now I will continue to get all the miles I can.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier
6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

Interesting little sub discussion going on between Guy and Brett.

I'll make this short and sweet since I really try to get my rest during the work week. As I settle into my new schedule after training, I can get into more detail w/ life as a linehaul driver. I still would like to offer tutorials on hooking up double pup trailers.

The first week I spent training with a linehaul driver. We made routine trips to meet another driver, swap trailers, and then returned back to our home terminal. Total length of the trip was 550 miles per day, round trip. I drove the whole week, it was awesome! So, my first week, I drove over 2K miles. Remember that day one was watching movies and HR stuff, so if I would've drove the entire 5 day week, I would've had 2750 miles. Eventually I'll get paid by the mile at .55, you can do the math. How many rookie drivers will crack 50K their first year driving? Not shabby at all. Again, remember that I share this not to gloat, but to show other student drivers or prospective drivers that if they can land an LTL job right out of school, they can make more than typical rookie OTR drivers at 30-35K for the first year.

This second week I've been on a different run w/ a different trainer. Average length of day has been 12 hours since I've started. The last two weeks I'll be on night shift in preparation for my schedule when I go solo. I'll be running the entire NE.

Hooking double pup trailers requires extra attention to detail. Driving them really isn't that bad, but it is different than a 53' trailer. Seems like more things could go wrong w/ the actual hooking up part, but that's just my observation. I've kept pretty good control over them while driving. You definitely don't have to square up your turns as much, like turning corners w/ a 53' trailer. And there is no backing.

My favorite tractor so far? The Freightliner Cascadia. Our company uses Freightliners and Volvos. For some reason, I can shift the Cascadia much better. I've even better successful floating the gears ;)

I love this job.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Lefty1's Comment
member avatar

Awesome thread!! As a family man planning on attending private school next month it is encouraging to hear there are options other than OTR. Living 50 miles north of Richmond, Va. and a willingness to move I seem to see a lot of LTL companies there. Am I right? Anyway, hope your new career transition remains smooth and look forward to your next post! Thanks to you, Brett and Guy for making this a great site! And whatever the reason for these LTL companies hiring newbies, I am happy to hear it. But it is hard to figure out why, but then again Unions are often hard to figure out.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

Awesome thread!! As a family man planning on attending private school next month it is encouraging to hear there are options other than OTR. Living 50 miles north of Richmond, Va. and a willingness to move I seem to see a lot of LTL companies there. Am I right? Anyway, hope your new career transition remains smooth and look forward to your next post! Thanks to you, Brett and Guy for making this a great site! And whatever the reason for these LTL companies hiring newbies, I am happy to hear it. But it is hard to figure out why, but then again Unions are often hard to figure out.

Good morning Thomas. Glad to hear you're gaining from this thread. I'll be posting more this weekend during my 2 days off. Just a few quick responses for you.

Best way to check to see if there is an LTL presence in your area of interest is to simply go to some of the company websites and look for terminals / service station locations. See if they're in your area.

As far as unions, I wouldn't even attempt to figure them out. smile.gif I don't work for a company that has a union. Some LTL companies that don't have a union: Fed Ex Freight, Old Dominion, Estes, and I believe Pitt-Ohio - there are others. Fed Ex Freight (not Ground) is one of the highest paying LTL outfits, and it's not because they're union. Personally, I'm glad my company isn't union. And that's all I'll say about that.

There are opportunities out there for your Thomas, but yes, you have to be in the right area at the right time. Call the terminals in your location and ask if they're hiring. Some companies will train you through their own school - e.g. Old Dominion, Conway Freight. Do your research before you lay out the cash for private school.

I'm wishing you the best.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Page 7 of 34 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: http://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel

Need help? We have instructions for sharing photos from photo sharing sites



example: http://www.truckingtruth.com/images/header.jpg
Submit
Cancel

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

This topic has the following tags:

Advice For New Truck Drivers Choosing A Trucking Company Doubles and Triples Linehaul LTL Driving Truck Driving Lifestyle
Click on any of the buttons above to view topics with that tag, or you can view a list of all forum tags here.

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More