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Stevens, Knight, Stevens, Knight

Topic 5390 | Page 3

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Trish S.'s Comment
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Thanks PJ, it's really good to hear about how these "facts" translate into real life. I'm leaning toward dry van based on a thread of Old School and Daniel (I think it was) ... different ways to run based on the flexibility on delivering loads. Don't think I would enjoy flatbed because of the tarping ... I can wrangle a feed sack but those tarps are heavy.

There's intangibles too ... oddly enough although the facts are on Knight's side, my gut is saying Stevens ... but that is probably based just on more or less rapport with the recruiters. And if Stevens is in line for a buyout, I'd rather steer clear, I've been through those, too much drama.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Matt S.'s Comment
member avatar

Trish, I have to agree with you. In the early stages of a trucking career, it probably makes sense to go dry van and I'm going that route. I'm thinking I might get the endorsements for passenger, tank, and double trailers. I know you can make more money with HazMat but that kind of scares me. I don't like the idea of transporting flammable material any more than the diesel for the truck itself :-P I would rather see how good a driver I am first. If I'm only just average then I certainly won't risk HazMat.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Trish S.'s Comment
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Maybe someone can correct me, but I don't see the urgency of getting endorsements unless the company requires it. Surely we can get them later? Knight doesn't require any, and I have my hands full studying the main stuff.

PJ's Comment
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For some reason some people seem to think they need them. Personally I don't agree. I got them as I needed them. Hauling dry van I didn't need any. One less thing to worry about. The only one that takes time to get is hazmat , because of the background check. I now have hazmat and tanker only because the company required it when I switched, for the fleet I wanted. If I had stayed OTR I would not have needed them. Just how I did it. Remember when it comes times to renew your license you may be required to retake some endorsement tests. Varies by state. Just one more thing to do.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Matt S.'s Comment
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IIRC, I read that Brett recommended getting some extra endorsements so that you can be as marketable as possible.

mountain girl's Comment
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One reason for getting all endorsements at once, when possible may be financial, even if the fees don't cost that much. If you go to the DMV in Colorado and test for all of them at once, you pay one fee. If you test for them separately, you pay a new fee and get photographed for a new license every time.

The background check cost nearly $80 for hazmat. Also, it shows diligence and a desire to accomplish as much out there as you can, to have all the endorsements. When I rattle them off, it simply distinguishes me from the crowd, a bit. It opens up possibilities.

-mountain girl

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

Captain "Cappie" K Miles's Comment
member avatar

AJ D, before you throw out a statement like this:

double-quotes-start.png

From what I already know about Knight and what I just gathered about Stevens this morning, I would go with Knight, hands down. No Comparison, IMHO

double-quotes-end.png

It is best to qualify what you are talking about or where the information came from. It's hardly helpful if you got this information from one of the many unreliable sources on the web, and since you didn't clarify anything we don't even know what you are talking about. Trish is trying to make a decision, and she needs good quantitative information that can be verified and confirmed, not just hearsay or truckers gossip.

I think Knight has a lot of great opportunities, but I'm not going to throw down on Stevens unless I've got some good solid facts to back up my arguments.

Old school... on that note I see bad reviews all over for PAM and trying not to be discouraged buy them but there is ALLOT. Do you know anything about the company

Brian W.'s Comment
member avatar

Something else to consider will be cost of insurance. Most are reasonable if you do not have any dependents. Single plans that companies offer range anywhere from 16 to 80 per week deduction. If you take the family plan, cheapest I know of is 108 per week and high as 154 per week. Then you you have other considerations like vacation and other insurance(life,short-term disability, etc) that you may want to inquire about. But from my personal experience talking to student drivers from Knight and Stevens, hands down Stevens had the worst reputation. Most were students that left Stevens because of poor training and no hometime.

But it sounds like you have done your homework and wish you the best. Always go with your gut instinct and know that training will not be a bed of roses but at the same time it shouldn't be a bed of thorns.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

The Chad's Comment
member avatar

I am set to start training with Stevens in March and I wanted to update the pay info for training. During the 2-3 weeks of classroom you don't get paid. Once you hit the road with a trainer you get $450/wk for 3 weeks, then $500/wk for 3 weeks, then you head back to Dallas to complete training and they give you an option to go home for a week, or you can get your truck and get to it. I started a thread in the other forum so I will update how it is going.

Natedog1971's Comment
member avatar

Just wanted to see if there was an update considering i am looking a Knight now, like to hear how it went for Trish and if Old School is still working for them, his opinion.

Thx

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