Update On My Training

Topic 675 | Page 1

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hamrhed12's Comment
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This will be quick and dirty, because I’m kinda tired right now.

I reported to Covenant in Chattanooga on April 22 for orientation, and by April 26, I was in a truck with a trainer. Been OTR for the last 3 weeks and I’m at home right now for a little R & R. In that time I’ve traveled approximately 12,000 miles and been places I’ve never been before: Phoenix, Albuquerque, L.A., Long Beach, Kansas City, San Antonio. I was all up and down “tornado alley” a week before the devastating storms hit Oklahoma.

Except for fueling and showers, my trainer avoids truck stops, preferring to park in shopping centers where there are restaurants and 24 hr. stores like Walmart where restrooms are handy. We average 1 meal a day, sustaining ourselves the rest of the time with munchies like trail mix, dried fruit and nuts.

I drive mostly at night and sleeping during the day in a moving truck has proven to be more difficult than I anticipated. As a result, I drive tired quite a bit and I usually start to fade after about 7 hours, requiring a pull-over and power nap. This has been my most difficult challenge to overcome thus far and something I must figure out for myself if I’m going to make it in this industry.

Well, that’s the Cliff Notes version. I’ll try to be more informative and interesting in the future!

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Hey, that was a great update!

Don't be surprised by the fact that you're having trouble sleeping while the truck is moving. Almost everyone does. It's very, very difficult to do and it takes a while to learn how to tune everything out and sleep. Unless you plan on teaming after training, this won't be a concern for long anyhow.

I noticed you didn't mention what a God-awful, obnoxious, maniacal lunatic your trainer is. Does this mean you guys are getting along pretty well? That would be awesome if that's the case. Dealing with these Hitler/Stalin type trainers is far more difficult most of the time than actually learning to drive the rig and deal with life on the road.

RedGator's Comment
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I dont know why but I cant actually sleep in a moving vehicle with music in my ears. The first 3 months you will always be tired but one your body gets adjusted you will be fine. Glad your doing Well.

hamrhed12's Comment
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Brett, my trainer is awesome. He doesn't yell much, just talks loud! But, seriously, we get along great and, as a bonus, he lives in Jacksonville too!

And, thanks Ms. RedGator. I'm hoping to tough it out and get over it ASAP because team driving is definitely in my future...at least as long as I'm with Covenant.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

RedGator's Comment
member avatar

Brett, my trainer is awesome. He doesn't yell much, just talks loud! But, seriously, we get along great and, as a bonus, he lives in Jacksonville too!

And, thanks Ms. RedGator. I'm hoping to tough it out and get over it ASAP because team driving is definitely in my future...at least as long as I'm with Covenant.

Their sister company is Star if you want to go solo they will switch you no problem is what the recruiter said.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Starcar's Comment
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Am I the only weird person who can sleep ( and I prefer to sleep) when the truck is moving ?? I like the movement of the truck, its a free back massage....I like the engine sound, it lulls me to sleep. What I don't like is when TSB has the CB AND the radio on...who the heck can listen to them bothwtf-2.gif

hamrhed12's Comment
member avatar

Am I the only weird person who can sleep ( and I prefer to sleep) when the truck is moving ?? I like the movement of the truck, its a free back massage....I like the engine sound, it lulls me to sleep. What I don't like is when TSB has the CB AND the radio on...who the heck can listen to them bothwtf-2.gif

No, you're not. My trainer is sawing logs (loudly) within moments of turning in, moving or sitting still. He keeps telling me I'll adjust to it. I just hope it's sooner rather than later.

RedGator's Comment
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Am I the only weird person who can sleep ( and I prefer to sleep) when the truck is moving ?? I like the movement of the truck, its a free back massage....I like the engine sound, it lulls me to sleep. What I don't like is when TSB has the CB AND the radio on...who the heck can listen to them bothwtf-2.gif

I actually prefer it myself but Im solo. Go figure:) Maybe one day ill find a handsome trucker to drive me around and get on my nerves lol

Troubador222's Comment
member avatar

Hey Hammerhed! Good to see the up date and glad you are doing well. It took me almost my whole 28 days with my trainer to get used to sleeping when the truck is moving. Now, most of the time, I do alright, but there are still some times when the road is rough, or my co driver is in a city stopping and starting a lot. What I did find is, even though I wake up, I go back to sleep and still end up getting rested.

It took me about the whole training period to just get used to driving a full 11 hour shift. I had to train my body and mind to do it. After about 2 weeks into my training, I would get so tired after 7 or 8 hours, I had to pull over. I told my trainer I thought I was never going to get used to it. He told me that everyone went through the same thing, and I was doing fine, and I would adjust to it quicker than I expected. And he was right, by the end of my training period, I was driving a whole shift with no problems.

My trainer was a good guy, and we became friends. We talk on the phone all the time. He is an African American gentleman about my age. We're both Southerners and are old enough to remember the times when someone like he and I could not have even traveled together. And we found we could talk about that, and share our different perspectives on it. I learned a lot from him and appreciate his friendship. I also appreciate the fact that if I have a question about anything, I can call him and he will still help.

crazy rebel's Comment
member avatar

Good job on the training bud ,and no starcar i always had trouble stayin awake while my trainer drove,i love the movement for the engine noise put me to sleep.i drove reefer my first 6 mnths and now miss the motor of that running.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

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