How To Get Exercise On The Road?

Topic 10512 | Page 1

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Bob C.'s Comment
member avatar

Hi Everyone,

I am not a trucker yet. And I want to make sure that I can put my health first as far as getting an hour of exercise in before each day.

If truckers get some space for their own things, then I would bring a bicycle or a stationary bike for exercising since I do not do jogging personally.

1. Is there usually enough personal space for a bike in the truck? 2. Do you get to set your own schedule when you are trucking, so that you can workout for an hour and shower before starting down the road, if you choose?

Thanks guys/ladies!

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Hi Everyone,

I am not a trucker yet. And I want to make sure that I can put my health first as far as getting an hour of exercise in before each day.

If truckers get some space for their own things, then I would bring a bicycle or a stationary bike for exercising since I do not do jogging personally.

1. Is there usually enough personal space for a bike in the truck? 2. Do you get to set your own schedule when you are trucking, so that you can workout for an hour and shower before starting down the road, if you choose?

Thanks guys/ladies!

Like you fitness and health is important to me. To be brutally honest, trucking seriously challenges ones ability and available time needed for staying fit. This is especially true in the beginning. Although it is possible to maintain reasonable fitness, please understand this is a demanding and at times exhausting job. Many days at the end of my 14 hours, all I want to do is eat and go to sleep because in 10 hours I am right back at it.

In regards to taking a bike with you, (and I am not suggesting this is a good thing to do) I have seen drivers with them fastened to the back of the sleeper box. If you have a high-end bike this is not the best place to store it for many reasons. Storing a bike inside of your truck would be very difficult, just getting it to fit through the door opening, and then past the seat would be a real trick. If you become a solo, over the road driver (OTR), your truck is your house on wheels. The available space gets used up quick storing basic essentials.

In addressing your second question, there are times when you will be able to workout before starting your day. Keep in mind after you pass your CDL test, depending on the company you hire on with, you will likely be teaming with a mentor/trainer for the first several months of your employment. This is called road training. Once you have completed an initial period of supervised driving, you and your mentor will be team driving. Your mentor drives while you sleep, when you drive your mentor sleeps. The truck will be moving roughly 22 hours out of a 24 hour day. The 2 hours the truck is not moving you are pre-tripping the truck, fueling (either the truck or yourself), using the bathroom, showering, trip planning, etc. Not much time for exercise.

My approach is that I exercise when I can, by walking whenever possible and "trying" to eat right. Since I spend a great deal of my time delivering goods to Walmart, I take full advantage of their typically huge parking lots. I usually use my 30 minute break to do a lap around the store, and then I am on my way. Depending on the truck stop, I have also walked the perimeter for exercise (beware of where you are walking though).

I highly suggest reading and studying as much of the information on this website as possible (buttons at the top of the webpage). It will provide you with a very good understanding of the trucking industry, what it takes to become a truck driver, and life on the road. Best of luck.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Seppo's Comment
member avatar
Once you have completed an initial period of supervised driving, you and your mentor will be team driving. Your mentor drives while you sleep, when you drive your mentor sleeps. The truck will be moving roughly 22 hours out of a 24 hour day. The 2 hours the truck is not moving you are pre-tripping the truck, fueling (either the truck or yourself), using the bathroom, showering, trip planning, etc. Not much time for exercise.

One way around this is to make sure you get on with a company that only does solo dispatch while you are training. Some companies will have you running team after a few days. With others, the trainee can only be driving if the trainer is in the passenger seat next to you.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar
double-quotes-start.png

Once you have completed an initial period of supervised driving, you and your mentor will be team driving. Your mentor drives while you sleep, when you drive your mentor sleeps. The truck will be moving roughly 22 hours out of a 24 hour day. The 2 hours the truck is not moving you are pre-tripping the truck, fueling (either the truck or yourself), using the bathroom, showering, trip planning, etc. Not much time for exercise.

double-quotes-end.png

One way around this is to make sure you get on with a company that only does solo dispatch while you are training. Some companies will have you running team after a few days. With others, the trainee can only be driving if the trainer is in the passenger seat next to you.

Since I am only familiar with the "training companies" like Prime, Swift, CR England, CRST, (that I believe all run team; trainer/student), could you name a company (s) that will dispatch solo and hire entry level drivers? I only know of one in my area and they are really small, rarely hiring entry level trainees, it's hit or miss. And they do not advertise it.

Not trying to put you on the spot, just curious if you had a company in mind so that our friend could look into it. confused.gif

Seppo's Comment
member avatar
double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Once you have completed an initial period of supervised driving, you and your mentor will be team driving. Your mentor drives while you sleep, when you drive your mentor sleeps. The truck will be moving roughly 22 hours out of a 24 hour day. The 2 hours the truck is not moving you are pre-tripping the truck, fueling (either the truck or yourself), using the bathroom, showering, trip planning, etc. Not much time for exercise.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

One way around this is to make sure you get on with a company that only does solo dispatch while you are training. Some companies will have you running team after a few days. With others, the trainee can only be driving if the trainer is in the passenger seat next to you.

double-quotes-end.png

Since I am only familiar with the "training companies" like Prime, Swift, CR England, CRST, (that I believe all run team; trainer/student), could you name a company (s) that will dispatch solo and hire entry level drivers? I only know of one in my area and they are really small, rarely hiring entry level trainees, it's hit or miss. And they do not advertise it.

Not trying to put you on the spot, just curious if you had a company in mind so that our friend could look into it. confused.gif

Unless anything has changed since I spoke with a recruiter in June, Knight does solo dispatch, with the caveat: "In dire circumstances towards the end of training you might receive a team load." They are pretty large and from the research I've done online, seem to be a decent company to drive for. I believe all their training is done out of their Phoenix headquarters.

Can't speak for anyone else. Look around on this website to see if you can find any information (https://www.truckingtruth.com/paid-cdl-training/) and call some recruiters at different companies to see what they have to say.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar
double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Once you have completed an initial period of supervised driving, you and your mentor will be team driving. Your mentor drives while you sleep, when you drive your mentor sleeps. The truck will be moving roughly 22 hours out of a 24 hour day. The 2 hours the truck is not moving you are pre-tripping the truck, fueling (either the truck or yourself), using the bathroom, showering, trip planning, etc. Not much time for exercise.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

One way around this is to make sure you get on with a company that only does solo dispatch while you are training. Some companies will have you running team after a few days. With others, the trainee can only be driving if the trainer is in the passenger seat next to you.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Since I am only familiar with the "training companies" like Prime, Swift, CR England, CRST, (that I believe all run team; trainer/student), could you name a company (s) that will dispatch solo and hire entry level drivers? I only know of one in my area and they are really small, rarely hiring entry level trainees, it's hit or miss. And they do not advertise it.

Not trying to put you on the spot, just curious if you had a company in mind so that our friend could look into it. confused.gif

double-quotes-end.png

Unless anything has changed since I spoke with a recruiter in June, Knight does solo dispatch, with the caveat: "In dire circumstances towards the end of training you might receive a team load." They are pretty large and from the research I've done online, seem to be a decent company to drive for. I believe all their training is done out of their Phoenix headquarters.

Can't speak for anyone else. Look around on this website to see if you can find any information (https://www.truckingtruth.com/paid-cdl-training/) and call some recruiters at different companies to see what they have to say.

Good to know. Thanks.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Curtis J.'s Comment
member avatar

What's Going on Bob

Its actually quite easy to get exercise while on the road. You can easily take advantage of the small space you have inside the cab of your truck. You can run in place for 25 to 30 minutes using the cab of your truck. I know it may sound a little boring running in place but you can crank the music up inside the cab and before you know it those 25 to 30 minutes will fly by. You can also use the same space to do pushups and jumping jacks. With the pushups just put your feet up on your bunk and do as many pushups as you can rest and repeat again. With the jumping jacks just turn sideways inside the cab inbetween the drivers seat and passenger seat and knock out a couple. You can also do a couple outside next to the truck. Now with food choices its all about moderation versus unhealthy. You can eat a little unhealthy here and there as long as its in moderation. I follow this rule of thumb on a daily basis.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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