Schneider Or YRC

Topic 10651 | Page 1

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Mathew H.'s Comment
member avatar

I have been talking to both and was wondering if anyone had any opinions on either. Schneider is possibly a dedicated Walmart run out of Wintersville OH. YRC is Road Driver out of Akron OH. Thanks and stay safe out there.

6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

What's important to you?

LTL will pay better than truckload, but LTL isn't for everyone. YRC wouldn't be my first choice of an LTL company. If YRC is nearby, you'll have other LTL companies to choose from.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Raz's Comment
member avatar

I agree with. 6 string Schneider offering. $5000 sign on in some areas for new cdl holders coming from approved schools But the orientation and inroad traing is only 3 weeks then you go solo Tempting to me but feel I need more time with a trainer to take what I learn at school to become a real skill Yrc is union with dues to pay And my understanding is they are not financially stable

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Mathew H.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks guys. There are plenty of LTL's here. I really think i should do Schneider for their training and to learn the ropes. Then maybe go to an ltl down the road. With all the options Schneider has in my area home time doesn't seem to be an issue

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier
6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

Mathew. I have a thread I started a while back where I talk about LTL and go into detail about my linehaul job.

LTL Trucking: My Linehaul Job

I can appreciate what you said about getting good training, but you don't have to go to a truckload company for that. I'm not trying to persuade you either way, but if hometime and maximizing your income is your primary goal in trucking, then I'd encourage you to skip truckload altogether and just go into LTL. If you wanna explore the country a bit, and find out what that OTR lifestyle is all about, then go truckload.

I give a list of some LTL companies in my thread, and also some ideas for how to get a LTL job. Some LTL companies will pay you for training - no need to shell out cash for private school. My top recommendations for LTL would be Old Dominion, Fed Ex Freight, UPSF, and Estes. UPSF is the only union shop out of those companies. I'd recommend ABF, also a union shop, but having to wait 2 years till you get any vacation is a deal breaker for a lot of people.

Schneider is a great truckload company. I thought about going with them for their tanker program.

It's all about what you want out of your career. But like I said, if you want to maximize your hometime and income, go LTL right away. You'll wanna start banking your seniority with an LTL company ASAP, no need to go truckload first.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Mathew H.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks 6 String...definetly alot of things to consider. I have family and friends working for Conway and are happy with them. I thought it was hard to get into the LTL's without experience. I'm going to have to do some research and read your thread. Thanks again

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier
Bsrlinmaz's Comment
member avatar

Can someone with experience in the linehaul portion of trucking tell me whether the requirement by most carriers for a driver to have a Haz-Mat endorsement is pretty much written in stone...or will some work around it? I have a felony from the '80s that prevents me from ever getting a Haz-Mat endorsement and/or the TWIC card...so if I know ahead of time it is something they 100% insist on, then I'll know not to waste anyone's time by applying.

Thank you for your time and assistance.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

James C.'s Comment
member avatar

I drive on that Walmart Wintersville account when if first opened in June of 2003. Drove out of the Bedford, PA Walmart for a few months until Wintersville was ready. I eventually moved on to other divisions in Schneider and stayed with them until August of last year. Took a year off from driving and about to start back at it next week. But I digress. I didn't make a whole lot of money on that account but it was easy driving. The stores unload their pallets. All you had to do was make sure they took the right ones and move on to the next store. Considering where Wintersville is located, some of the Walmart store you had to deliver to where in interesting places in the hills of West Virginia and Pennsylvania.

6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

Can someone with experience in the linehaul portion of trucking tell me whether the requirement by most carriers for a driver to have a Haz-Mat endorsement is pretty much written in stone...or will some work around it? I have a felony from the '80s that prevents me from ever getting a Haz-Mat endorsement and/or the TWIC card...so if I know ahead of time it is something they 100% insist on, then I'll know not to waste anyone's time by applying.

Thank you for your time and assistance.

I'm a linehaul driver. My suggestion is to call some of these LTL companies and ask if hazmat is required. Other than calling yourself, you'll just be listening to opinions on the matter. I know for Old Dominion, you cannot work for them as a linehaul driver without hazmat, doubles / triples, and tank endorsements. We pull a lot of hazmat. I can't think of a week that's gone by where I haven't pulled hazmat.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

YRC/CityDriver/'s Comment
member avatar

YRC is in better shape than most of you think... Get some LTL Experience.. Linehaul or City, City would be best for a new driver in my opinion. As it pushes your limits and is obviously a hell of alot harder than Linehaul..

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
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