OTL-Averitt Express Looking For Top Tier Drivers

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Rolling Thunder's Comment
member avatar

Hey Brett and Mods, I hope I can post this here. If not, do your thing.

On Tour Logistics, a division of Averitt Express, is looking for professional drivers with a no fail work ethic and a good attitude to be a tour and/or production driver for the entertainment industry. This division is growing at a very rapid rate for us and we need drivers.

Here are some of the current requirements:

  • Clean safety record
  • Clean criminal history
  • 4 months of employment with Averitt as a driver in any division. While in that 4 month period the driver must maintain at least 8 safety points (you start with 8 from day 1).
  • Hazmat certification
  • A recommendation from your FM.
  • Having a passport and being flatbed certified are mandatory, but, these can be completed after acceptance.

The driver will be out from a couple weeks to several months at a time depending on the needs of the client. (my longest stretch has been just over 2 mo.).

Pay is on a salary basis while on tour. Production runs are paid by the mile plus extras.

You can PM me for more info.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Miss Miyoshi's Comment
member avatar

This is awesome! I was considering doing entertainment trucking after getting a couple of years driving under my belt, possibly even tour bus driving. I've toured with bands before (on the production team) and I'm going to miss the environment.

I'm curious about the hazmat and flatbed requirements. Most concert trucks I've seen have been regular box trailers. Can I ask what else is transported that would need these qualifications?

I had considered looking into Upstaging Lighting and Transport, Stagecall, and Star Coaches (for tour bus driving.) I'll be sure to keep On Tour Logistics on my list of possibilities after I've gotten some experience under my belt.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Rolling Thunder's Comment
member avatar

This is awesome! I was considering doing entertainment trucking after getting a couple of years driving under my belt, possibly even tour bus driving. I've toured with bands before (on the production team) and I'm going to miss the environment.

I'm curious about the hazmat and flatbed requirements. Most concert trucks I've seen have been regular box trailers. Can I ask what else is transported that would need these qualifications?

I had considered looking into Upstaging Lighting and Transport, Stagecall, and Star Coaches (for tour bus driving.) I'll be sure to keep On Tour Logistics on my list of possibilities after I've gotten some experience under my belt.

Absolutely do some research on the other companies and coach.

We also haul staging (flatbed) around. I have done it only once and it's not so bad. We pick 'em up already loaded and strapped. Double check straps, pre-trip and roll. We pull up, they pop straps, unload and we go away. Very easy stuff. There are more perks, but, it is easier for me to answer questions directly instead trying to list them.

This may be changing very soon, but, right now we have the option of running truckload between tours to keep the money flowing. In order to get us where we need to be (usually Nashville) to start a tour, Hazmat runs give the FM's a lot more loads to choose from so, it is currently a requirement. It is for Averitt truckload anyway.

Fyi, you do not need 2yrs experience to drive for OTL. Not even 1yr. It is possible to be doing this after only 4 months... Even out of school. We have an awesome training and evaluation process that can take a rookie with the right stuff and bring them along.

As I said above, do all the research you can to make the right move.

One more fyi from a coach drivers mouth, they have to clean the busses... You toured so, let that sink in.

Good luck on whatever path you take and be safe.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Rolling Thunder's Comment
member avatar

Just read what I have written and want to elaborate on the "right stuff" comment.

It does not matter at all how you look, your lifestyle or anything else superficial like that. We truly become family out here so a good attitude is the number one item we look at. A calm demeanor, willingness to participate in our shenanigans, lack of being star struck, willingness to work and interact as a team member and the ability to smile are also key.

smile.gif

Miss Miyoshi's Comment
member avatar

Absolutely do some research on the other companies and coach.

We also haul staging (flatbed) around. I have done it only once and it's not so bad. We pick 'em up already loaded and strapped. Double check straps, pre-trip and roll. We pull up, they pop straps, unload and we go away. Very easy stuff. There are more perks, but, it is easier for me to answer questions directly instead trying to list them.

This may be changing very soon, but, right now we have the option of running truckload between tours to keep the money flowing. In order to get us where we need to be (usually Nashville) to start a tour, Hazmat runs give the FM's a lot more loads to choose from so, it is currently a requirement. It is for Averitt truckload anyway.

Fyi, you do not need 2yrs experience to drive for OTL. Not even 1yr. It is possible to be doing this after only 4 months... Even out of school. We have an awesome training and evaluation process that can take a rookie with the right stuff and bring them along.

As I said above, do all the research you can to make the right move.

One more fyi from a coach drivers mouth, they have to clean the busses... You toured so, let that sink in.

Good luck on whatever path you take and be safe.

It's nice that you don't have to do too much with the flatbed. I'll be sure to try to get experience with that as well. Can't hurt, and no matter where I go the more experience I have the more valuable I will be to an employer.

That makes sense about running the hazmat stuff. I was going to ask how often someone gets on a tour call. That's the main reason I got out of the touring business was because it wasn't steady enough to pay my bills on a regular basis. It was really feast or famine. (But I was merchandising, and that's the lowest paid job with the least stability.) I figure if I can average being busy for 10 months out of the year I'm doing good.

I know the companies I listed wanted at least 2 years OTR. If I went with company sponsored training I would have to be with them at least a year, if not more. If I thought I could be busy enough from the start to warrant it, I would do the CDL training at home and then apply with On Tour. But I wouldn't have the requisite experience. I would be fresh out of CDL school. But if they would take a pure greenhorn and train me and give me enough runs to make the money I want to make I will turn around and go to CDL school immediately and not wait until the spring to do company sponsored.

My only other concern would be running a tanker when I have had so little experience. I have read how difficult they are to control with the load displacement, and in truth it terrifies me to try to learn that on top of learning how to drive a truck. But I guess at that point you suck it up and just do it.

Oh, and don't I know about cleaning the coaches. Daily cleaning usually fell to me anyway, because hello only girl on the bus! But every driver I've been with has been awesome as well, and usually appreciated the daily light housekeeping. Having to empty the ****er though......yeah, not looking forward to that. Also, at least for Star Coaches (in Atlanta) they want people with engine mechanic expertise. Makes sense, considering how many times we ended up on the side of the road.....

It does not matter at all how you look, your lifestyle or anything else superficial like that. We truly become family out here so a good attitude is the number one item we look at. A calm demeanor, willingness to participate in our shenanigans, lack of being star struck, willingness to work and interact as a team member and the ability to smile are also key.

I'm glad the tattoos, facial piercings, and odd colored hair is accepted. I'm hoping it is that way as well with Prime, if I end up there. We'll see. And the road family is exactly what I'm missing about touring. I would love to be in the environment again, even if I'm not "in" with the bands I'll be working for like I was when I did crew work. As for being star struck, they're people just like you and I. Most of the artists who require this type of touring set up are not people I even know what their music sounded like. I worked for heavy metal bands, and unless you're Metallica or Megadeth or Def Leppard or something like that you're definitely not playing stadiums and amphitheaters. Most of the bands I worked for played 500 - 2000 capacity venues tops. With King Diamond we had a rig follow us with stage gear because he used his full European festival stage set up. I'll have to email their production manager to see who their trucking company was. I just don't remember.

Thanks for all the info!! If you have any more words of wisdom for me, feel free to drop them here or send me a PM. I would be happy to talk shop with you! \m/(*-*)\m/

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

Sounds like a fun gig. Last year when I was considering getting my cdl I actually thought about something like this. I actually read about a class that stagecoach offers in Nashville for entertainment industry driving. I only live a couple hours north of there.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Rolling Thunder's Comment
member avatar

We don't do tankers at all.

If you were to be hired by Averitt out of school, you would be with a trainer for 5 wks then go solo. The four months would start when training ends.

We go to any and all venues. I am on a 9 truck tour right now.

Miss Miyoshi's Comment
member avatar

We don't do tankers at all.

If you were to be hired by Averitt out of school, you would be with a trainer for 5 wks then go solo. The four months would start when training ends.

We go to any and all venues. I am on a 9 truck tour right now.

Now my curiosity is super piqued. I'll definitely look into Averitt. If I'm interested, I would have to complete CDL training on my own first, and then apply, correct? Also, if I live in VA will that be an issue? And, finally, are you at liberty to say how much road time you average in a year?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Rolling Thunder's Comment
member avatar

Sounds like a fun gig. Last year when I was considering getting my cdl I actually thought about something like this. I actually read about a class that stagecoach offers in Nashville for entertainment industry driving. I only live a couple hours north of there.

Never hurts to talk to them. May find exactly what you're looking for...

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Rolling Thunder's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

We don't do tankers at all.

If you were to be hired by Averitt out of school, you would be with a trainer for 5 wks then go solo. The four months would start when training ends.

We go to any and all venues. I am on a 9 truck tour right now.

double-quotes-end.png

Now my curiosity is super piqued. I'll definitely look into Averitt. If I'm interested, I would have to complete CDL training on my own first, and then apply, correct? Also, if I live in VA will that be an issue? And, finally, are you at liberty to say how much road time you average in a year?

Nah, it's better to apply while in school. This will give them time to do their thing and get back to you in time so that you do not have a long gap between school and driving.

We have yards in VA, so, no problem there.

A lot. I usually take a few days off after a tour and may run truck load for a week until I am put on another. That truly depends on the driver. If the attitude is sketchy, it will be reflected with little tour time.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
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