Drive Test

Topic 12484 | Page 1

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Davor M.'s Comment
member avatar

All right so I'm preparing to go to the DMV on Tuesday and take my drive/skills test...I've been driving with my uncle who is an owner/operator and learned a lot from him...since I didn't go to truck school to get my training I really don't know what to expect at the DMV, I've been reading a lot on TT and YouTube videos ...can some of you guys help me out with what I can expect over there, I'm nervous and really want to pass and get going ... Thanks in advance

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Besides the drive around town, you'll need to know the Pre-trip including the in-cab check & air brake testing. These need to be done almost to a word-for-word script. You will need to perform at least two backing skills, the examiner chooses from 90 alley dock, parallel (left or right) and offset (left or right)

Generally you need to do only the first section of the pre-trip (Engine check and up to checking the drive wheels, usually) plus all of the in-cab, or at least until the examiner feels you know what you're doing.

Then you are out for drive. If you or your uncle can find out the path of the drive test, you can certainly go out for a dry run yourself, and this will make you feel more comfortable doing it.

(Disclaimers: I do not know the particulars of the North Carolina test, and the points I mentioned are not guaranteed, but this is a general picture of the requirements.)

Just keep this in mind: you have already done all the things the examiner asks you to do, only this time you have to do them with a complete stranger on board. That's the only difference!

Have you looked at Daniel B's Pre-Trip Inspection - My Way! and our own Passing The CDL Road Test: What Are CDL Examiners Looking For?

Pre-trip Inspection:

A pre-trip inspection is a thorough inspection of the truck completed before driving for the first time each day.

Federal and state laws require that drivers inspect their vehicles. Federal and state inspectors also may inspect your vehicles. If they judge a vehicle to be unsafe, they will put it “out of service” until it is repaired.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Barry Y. ( Watchd0g)'s Comment
member avatar

Not sure about NC, but I believe here in PA it goes along these lines>

Pre trip inspection: call out what you are looking at, what you are looking for , and why. (cracks, missing bolts, leaks, bad hoses etc.)

Skills test. Backing and parallel parking.

Drive the course. On course the instructor will have you do an emergency pull off (placing your triangles), a down hill maneuver with flashers, and probably a rail road crossing. Make sure you are looking (not just mentioning it) at all intersections in all directions, slow and put on flashers at rail road crossings while looking both ways before, during and in the mirrors as your trailer passed over. pay attention to any signs, he may ask you what they said. Truck weight limits, bridge clearance signs etc.

don't hit a curb, don't stall and don't violate the other lanes.

My course has a few tricky areas. One spot is a 2 lane undivided sharp bend, you need to hit the flashers and stop if needed, because you do indeed have to violate the other lane to stay off the side walk on the right. So to sum it up, find out what course they use on the road , and learn it, practice it, and dream about it.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Davor M.'s Comment
member avatar

Besides the drive around town, you'll need to know the Pre-trip including the in-cab check & air brake testing. These need to be done almost to a word-for-word script. You will need to perform at least two backing skills, the examiner chooses from 90 alley dock, parallel (left or right) and offset (left or right)

Generally you need to do only the first section of the pre-trip (Engine check and up to checking the drive wheels, usually) plus all of the in-cab, or at least until the examiner feels you know what you're doing.

Then you are out for drive. If you or your uncle can find out the path of the drive test, you can certainly go out for a dry run yourself, and this will make you feel more comfortable doing it.

(Disclaimers: I do not know the particulars of the North Carolina test, and the points I mentioned are not guaranteed, but this is a general picture of the requirements.)

Just keep this in mind: you have already done all the things the examiner asks you to do, only this time you have to do them with a complete stranger on board. That's the only difference!

Have you looked at Daniel B's Pre-Trip Inspection - My Way! and our own Passing The CDL Road Test: What Are CDL Examiners Looking For?

Errol!!! Thanks for the info...I already got the pre-trip down, I used Daniels pre trip packet and it was the most helpful of anything that I found I also watched the heavy metal trucking school video too like 100 times...I feel prepared for that part I guess it's just the butterflies that are getting to me...but thanks again for taking the time to write a reply, Errol

Pre-trip Inspection:

A pre-trip inspection is a thorough inspection of the truck completed before driving for the first time each day.

Federal and state laws require that drivers inspect their vehicles. Federal and state inspectors also may inspect your vehicles. If they judge a vehicle to be unsafe, they will put it “out of service” until it is repaired.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Davor M.'s Comment
member avatar

Not sure about NC, but I believe here in PA it goes along these lines>

Pre trip inspection: call out what you are looking at, what you are looking for , and why. (cracks, missing bolts, leaks, bad hoses etc.)

Skills test. Backing and parallel parking.

Drive the course. On course the instructor will have you do an emergency pull off (placing your triangles), a down hill maneuver with flashers, and probably a rail road crossing. Make sure you are looking (not just mentioning it) at all intersections in all directions, slow and put on flashers at rail road crossings while looking both ways before, during and in the mirrors as your trailer passed over. pay attention to any signs, he may ask you what they said. Truck weight limits, bridge clearance signs etc.

don't hit a curb, don't stall and don't violate the other lanes.

My course has a few tricky areas. One spot is a 2 lane undivided sharp bend, you need to hit the flashers and stop if needed, because you do indeed have to violate the other lane to stay off the side walk on the right. So to sum it up, find out what course they use on the road , and learn it, practice it, and dream about it.

Ok, I'm going to remember everything you said and I'm be prepared for that...i don't how I can get the test route though, that would sure help out a lot ...I'm keep digging and see what else I can find...but thanks for taking the time to write a reply...

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Barry Y. ( Watchd0g)'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Not sure about NC, but I believe here in PA it goes along these lines>

Pre trip inspection: call out what you are looking at, what you are looking for , and why. (cracks, missing bolts, leaks, bad hoses etc.)

Skills test. Backing and parallel parking.

Drive the course. On course the instructor will have you do an emergency pull off (placing your triangles), a down hill maneuver with flashers, and probably a rail road crossing. Make sure you are looking (not just mentioning it) at all intersections in all directions, slow and put on flashers at rail road crossings while looking both ways before, during and in the mirrors as your trailer passed over. pay attention to any signs, he may ask you what they said. Truck weight limits, bridge clearance signs etc.

don't hit a curb, don't stall and don't violate the other lanes.

My course has a few tricky areas. One spot is a 2 lane undivided sharp bend, you need to hit the flashers and stop if needed, because you do indeed have to violate the other lane to stay off the side walk on the right. So to sum it up, find out what course they use on the road , and learn it, practice it, and dream about it.

Ok, I'm going to remember everything you said and I'm be prepared for that...i don't how I can get the test route though, that would sure help out a lot ...I'm keep digging and see what else I can find...but thanks for taking the time to write a reply...

double-quotes-end.png

It may take a bit of time, but maybe go sit at the DMV and then try to follow someone testing.

I got lucky, the school I go to also does most of the testing for the region, so my instructor's know the course and know the tester.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Phil C.'s Comment
member avatar

There are some things you can do for "extra credit" to add points to offset any you might miss, like to say "I am performing a safe start with the transmission in neutral and the clutch pedal depressed" Also remember you get 3 pull-ups during each backing test, use them if you need to, and dont be afraid to get out and look, on the alley dock we had to come within 3 feet of the "dock" with the end of the trailer, so I got pretty close then got out to look so I could make sure I got close enough. Watch the speed limit signs, my test included "what is the speed limit here phil?" shortly after we passed a speed limit sign. Don't hit anything with the trailer tires like the curb in a turn, slow is fine dont hurry. Always stop behind the stop sign or behind the stop bar. Also pay attention to any railroad crossing or overpass heights. good luck!

Phil

Miss Miyoshi's Comment
member avatar

Hey Davor. Are you Croatian? My ex-husband's name is Davor, from Zadar.

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

There are some things you can do for "extra credit" to add points to offset any you might miss, like to say "I am performing a safe start with the transmission in neutral and the clutch pedal depressed" Also remember you get 3 pull-ups during each backing test, use them if you need to, and dont be afraid to get out and look, on the alley dock we had to come within 3 feet of encroachmentwith the end of the trailer, so I got pretty close then got out to look so I could make sure I got close enough. Watch the speed limit signs, my test included "what is the speed limit here phil?" shortly after we passed a speed limit sign. Don't hit anything with the trailer tires like the curb in a turn, slow is fine dont hurry. Always stop behind the stop sign or behind the stop bar. Also pay attention to any railroad crossing or overpass heights. good luck!

Phil

Phil, In Kentucky, that wouldn't have been extra credit, but required to pass with the addition of "and I am checking for drag and free play of the clutch as I slowly release it." Here our exams administered by a DOT (or their preference) a Vehicle Enforcement Officer.

Our exams go like this:

Incab inspection. Must be completed in a particular order. Any deviation or omission is an automatic failure.

Outside Pretrip: Once ypu pass your incab, the examaminer will tell you to proceed to the outside of the truck. You will be tested on part A (the tractor), part B (the trailer), or part C ( the whole shebang). No matter what part you are required to do, EVERY ONE does the coupling.

IF you pass your pretrip, you can move on to your backing skills exam. You will complete a straight line back (1 free pullup & goal), an offset on the side of the examiner's choice (2 free pullups, 2 goal), and a parallel on the side which the examaminer again chooses. (2 free pull-ups, 2 goal). You have 12 points total available for your backing skills test. End wall cones are 4 pt deduct, side cones are 2 pt deduct, wall encroachment 2 pts deduct and pull up required. Extra pullups 1 pt deduct. You pass if you have any points remaining. Ideally you go into your parallel with 12 available points.

Road skills. A course of extremely tight turns which actually require you to take the opposing lane at 1 point. An uphill entrance and exit to a parkway and then an interstate with downhill exit to a very narrow street with a ton of s-curves. A rt turn onto a street with a blind curve of oncoming traffic. The good.. the highest speed limit on the course is 35mph with exception of the short strip on I-265, but you're there such a short time you never make it past 7th gear lol. Our exams are given in downtown Louisville, KY lol. Accidents caused by crazy 4wheelers are not uncommon during testing.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

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