My Adventure W/ Werner Enterprises

Topic 12762 | Page 1

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KaoMinerva's Comment
member avatar

First off let me say that I have been lurking here before I even got my CDL. I finally had to join after reading so much and needing so many questions answered. Well, let's get to it.

Werner doesn't have a good reputation as a company, EVERYONE knows this. I'm here to tell you that I had a very VERY good experience with Werner. I started fresh out of school back in Feb. 2015 on DG training and quit the first day lol. I greyhound myself back to Memphis and eventually got a local gig with 7up. For you rookies out there, local jobs are just as demanding as the real truck driving jobs when you have no experience. You will be home every night, but only to sleep, wake up, and work that 60 hour work week. After being sore every day from lifting drinks etc, I took the path of less resistance and went back to Werner. Now...

I started training again sometime back in June 2015 with the trainer Bret Smith... AWESOME GUY. He's the best thing about training on Dollar General. All I did was drive and only unloaded if I wanted to. I stayed on with him like 2 weeks, passed road test, and got my truck. IF YOU ARE IN MEMPHIS, TN.... GET ON THE TREADWAYS ACCOUNT IMMEDIATELY!!!!!!!!! This account was like HEAVEN WITH WERNER. You will be hauling tires to TX, LA, MS, SC, OH, TN, OK, AL, GA. It's a dedicated account and you will be home on weekends and pass through several times weekly. The fleet manager , Kate, is a god send. I told her I wouldn't accept any runs under Memphis to Dallas and she made it happen. All my runs were 450+. I knew where I was going and didn't need my GPS anymore. Your loads WILL NEVER even smell 40K, usually around 32K-35K so don't bother scaling. I was in a brand new 2016 Pete, had 67 miles on that baby when I got her. Man I loved it. The pay WAS .25 then .30 after safety bonus given you don't tear their **** up lol. It was just raised to straight .33 which was nice. I ran an average of 2500 miles a week. On a bad week, like 2000-2200 on a good week 2700-3200. I have the stubs to prove I was making gross between 750-1000 easily home so much you'd think I was local. Werner bought my new mustang lol.

On the negative side, sometimes you may have to get a trailer fixed which was annoying AF. I found the 60 day inspections and DOT inspections you must do annoying but for good reason. Werner does take care of their equipment no matter how slow they are at approving things. Forget detention pay unless you got a cool ass fleet manager. I have gotten it every time, but only $50. Hey, $50 is better than 0 right?

As good as this may sound, my time with Werner came to an end mid Jan. Fraudulent accusations from an ex were brought against me and I had to leave. It sucks because as I rookie, I loved Werner. The money was great, DOT was a non factor, good trailers at TBC/Cooper Tires, best home time out of all my rookie driving friends. Oh and let's not forget those new trucks. Like I said, Werner has a bad rep and for good reason, but they were very good to me man. I really miss them already.

As stated, IF YOU ARE OUT OF MEMPHIS.... KILL SOMEBODY TO GET ON THAT TREADWAYS ACCOUNT!

That's my experience guys, thanks for reading.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

Like I said, Werner has a bad rep and for good reason, but they were very good to me man. I really miss them already.

Great story, but don't you realize by now that the "bad rep" is usually NOT for "good reason?"

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

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Like I said, Werner has a bad rep and for good reason, but they were very good to me man. I really miss them already.

double-quotes-end.png

Great story, but don't you realize by now that the "bad rep" is usually NOT for "good reason?"

I was gonna say the same thing. They're one of the largest, most successful, and most consistently profitable major companies in the nation. They're publicly traded under the symbol WERN so you can see their financials over the years. And you said yourself you had no problem getting miles, you were treated well, you made good money, and the equipment is great.

So why would they have a bad reputation?

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

KaoMinerva's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

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Like I said, Werner has a bad rep and for good reason, but they were very good to me man. I really miss them already.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Great story, but don't you realize by now that the "bad rep" is usually NOT for "good reason?"

double-quotes-end.png

I was gonna say the same thing. They're one of the largest, most successful, and most consistently profitable major companies in the nation. They're publicly traded under the symbol WERN so you can see their financials over the years. And you said yourself you had no problem getting miles, you were treated well, you made good money, and the equipment is great.

So why would they have a bad reputation?

Well you know the ole bad sayings about Werner. I was hesitant at first, but it was the best decision I ever made. Glad I chose them over Schneider. I really hate it ended the way it did.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Charlie Mac's Comment
member avatar

So what was the "Good Reason" for the bad Rep?

miracleofmagick's Comment
member avatar

The "good" reason for the bad rep would be the drivers who don't do what they're supposed to and blame the company. Just like the bad reps of most of the big companies.

I still drive for Werner and they have treated me well. On those occasions I have had to be at a terminal for any length of time, I have invariably ended up talking to a driver or two that had all kinds of complaints about the company, but I was always left with a feeling they weren't telling the full story.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
I have invariably ended up talking to a driver or two that had all kinds of complaints about the company, but I was always left with a feeling they weren't telling the full story.

They never do. If you talk it out long enough they'll eventually reveal why they're not getting the miles and treatment they want. At first it's always like, "I'm perfect and I do everything perfectly but they won't give me any miles." Then over a period of about ten minutes they'll reveal:

  • I don't like driving at night and I told them that
  • I told them I hate the Northeast and I won't go there
  • I don't like short runs and I keep telling them I don't want em
  • I hate Volvos and they won't give me a Freightliner
  • I've only been late a few times but they weren't my fault

......and on and on it goes. It didn't take long being in this industry before I realized that 98% of the drivers out there complaining about their companies aren't getting any miles because they either can't handle them or won't handle them for various reasons. But the pattern is always the same. A driver will start with this list of complaints about the company and slowly over time reveal the list of reasons summarizing how they're causing their own demise.

KaoMinerva's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I have invariably ended up talking to a driver or two that had all kinds of complaints about the company, but I was always left with a feeling they weren't telling the full story.

double-quotes-end.png

They never do. If you talk it out long enough they'll eventually reveal why they're not getting the miles and treatment they want. At first it's always like, "I'm perfect and I do everything perfectly but they won't give me any miles." Then over a period of about ten minutes they'll reveal:

  • I don't like driving at night and I told them that
  • I told them I hate the Northeast and I won't go there
  • I don't like short runs and I keep telling them I don't want em
  • I hate Volvos and they won't give me a Freightliner
  • I've only been late a few times but they weren't my fault

......and on and on it goes. It didn't take long being in this industry before I realized that 98% of the drivers out there complaining about their companies aren't getting any miles because they either can't handle them or won't handle them for various reasons. But the pattern is always the same. A driver will start with this list of complaints about the company and slowly over time reveal the list of reasons summarizing how they're causing their own demise.

Man I was never like that. When I was driving, it was me and the road. I should be starting at Marten Transport on Monday so I'm ready to get back to doing what I love. Still in driving shape too. Drove from Memphis to Tucson in under 24 hours. (Personal vehicle of course)

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