DDS In Georgia

Topic 12892 | Page 1

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Chicon's Comment
member avatar

So, I'm done with school, I tested on Tuesday, failed pre-trip, the examiner said I didn't mention the coupling system. Before the test started, she said do the drivers door and the back of the tractor, I asked just the back of the tractor, not the coupling system, she said she would let me know. So you can imagine my frustration when she failed me for not talking about something she didn't tell me to. So I get another shot on Friday, the examiner gave me the front of the truck and the engine compartment, everything went great, next up in cab, got to my air loss test, and half way through, I realized I hadn't turned the key on, so I stopped, told him I didn't have the key on, he said no problem, went through everything and when I got finished he asked did I want to do it again, sure I said, he's giving me a second chance because of the key, got finished, he said I did an excellent job outside and inside, but during both times of doing the air loss test, I didn't have the service break applied. Seriously, I saw the needle move both times when I applied the break, do you honestly think that I'm going to tell you what I'm doing, why I'm doing, and what I'm looking for and then not press the brake pedal. His response was the same, you didn't press the brake pedal. So now, I have to wait 7 days to retake the test. Oh another thing, I've arrived 20mins before my scheduled test time and both times the examiner didn't come out until 15-20 mins after my scheduled time, so that buts my 2HR window for the test down. Has anyone else had problems like these?

Travis H.'s Comment
member avatar

I'm currently in school and I have to retake backing tests I failed on Friday, and the road test I couldn't take because the school doesn't let you even attempt the road test until you pass all of your backing test. I did get perfect scores on my pre-trip and in cab tests. The advice I have to give others on passing those tests like I did is to get into a routine and try to name the parts off in the same order every time so you don't forget one. Touch every part that you talk about, and explain what those parts should or shouldn't be.

For example, we are taught that all parts need to be properly mounted and secured, not cracked, bent, or broken, have all bolts present and tight, and are not leaking. All belts should have 1/2 - 3/4 an inch play and shouldn't be worn or frayed. All rubber had no abrasions, bubbles, or cuts (ABC). All glass and lights should be clean and clear and free of illegal tape or stickers. Remember to say the lights are the proper color. (Amber, red, clear, etc. depending on the lights). Remember to name your emergency equipment. You would also do well to treat your mirrors like glass (clean and clear, no illegal tape or stickers) but also add that they are adjusted to you (the driver).

I was told by the instructors that regardless of what part of the truck we test on, we still have to do the coupling and fifth wheel and name all the parts and describe how they should be in working order. Unless you physically remove the glad hands, the rubber grommets on the inside are easy to miss and depending on the tester you may lose credit for missing them. In this way you can also accidentally miss the metal prongs on the electric lines.

If you can't touch a part because it is out of reach, the instructor will likely give you credit if you just point to it and describe what part it is and what you are looking for. In my test, there was no way I could reach the front and rear spring mounts, not the springs, without physically getting underneath the tractor (I had front of truck and the engine compartment). So I pointed to those parts (don't forget the u-bolts!) told the tester what parts they were and what I was looking for, and I was given credit for those parts.

On the in cab, the easiest part to miss is the emergency equipment because it is often out of sight. Name it first and get it out of the way. For the brake tests, you DO need to apply the correct amount of pressure for the applied pressure brake test, hold that pressure for one minute, and tell the instructor that the psi didn't drop more than 4 psi in that minute that you observed. Before even thinking of doing the brake tests, make sure that you have enough air pressure to do them. I complete my brake tests in the following order:

1. Tug tests - tractor then trailer, trailer then tractor, doesn't matter just do them together and remember to do both.

2. Service brake tests - Low gear, pull forward at 5mph and then apply service brakes. Vehicle stopped and shouldn't lurch to the left or right.

3. Governor cut out test - should cut out at 125 psi. By doing this now you will have enough pressure to do the next tests.

4. Turn the engine off. DO NOT TAKE YOUR HAND OFF THE KEY! Flip the battery on but don't start the engine.

5. Static Test - Sit like a lemon, watch the air tanks and count for 1 minute. Do nothing else. Vehicle should lose no more than 3psi in that 1 minute.

6. Applied pressure test - Apply 90 lbs of pressure to the service brakes. Hold the pressure for 1 minute. Tanks shouldn't leak more than 4psi in that one minute.

7. Low pressure alarm - Lights and alarms should come on before 60 psi or half the governor cut out. Fan the brakes to make the pressure drop.

8. Buttons - The tractor and trailer brakes should apply (buttons will "pop out") between 40 and 20 psi. Fan the brakes and wait for them both to pop out. Do NOT touch the buttons while performing this test, or you may fail.

I would also say the name of the test and describe what you are going to do to the truck for each test and what you are looking for while conducting the tests before actually conducting the tests. For example, if you are fanning the brakes and the buttons pop out before you tell the examiner that they should pop out between 20 and 40 psi, you may fail the test.

Hope this helps!

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Chicon, my advise is to be very verbal during that whole procedure. What I mean is tell the tester what you are doing. Like this: "I am now putting some foot pressure on the brake pedal as I watch the air gauges to see if there is any air loss while I hold pressure on the line." Verbalize everything, and I think that will help you remember each step along the way, and keep the tester fully informed of what you are doing.

Don't sweat the fact that you failed. Get back out there and do it again. Odds are that you will have a different person next time and the one you had this time may have been having a bad day or something. Just keep your cool and get back out there and show 'em how it's done!

Chicon's Comment
member avatar

Chicon, my advise is to be very verbal during that whole procedure. What I mean is tell the tester what you are doing. Like this: "I am now putting some foot pressure on the brake pedal as I watch the air gauges to see if there is any air loss while I hold pressure on the line." Verbalize everything, and I think that will help you remember each step along the way, and keep the tester fully informed of what you are doing.

Don't sweat the fact that you failed. Get back out there and do it again. Odds are that you will have a different person next time and the one you had this time may have been having a bad day or something. Just keep your cool and get back out there and show 'em how it's done!

Well, that's exactly what I did the second time, that's why it bothers me so much that he failed me. I just don't get why he would have thought that I wasn't applying the brake either time I did the test with him. I said, I'm going to shut the truck off, I'm going to release the parking and trailer brakes, I'm then going to apply the service brake and I shouldn't loose no more than 4 psi in one minute in a combination vehicle , of course I did what I said, but he didn't think so. Well thanks for the vote of confidence old school, if I don't pass it this time, then I will definitely be convinced something else is going on.

Combination Vehicle:

A vehicle with two separate parts - the power unit (tractor) and the trailer. Tractor-trailers are considered combination vehicles.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

UpNorthTrip's Comment
member avatar

Hey if u don't mind what school you attend? I ask because that's exactly how we were taught in my class like VERBATIM!!!

I'm currently in school and I have to retake backing tests I failed on Friday, and the road test I couldn't take because the school doesn't let you even attempt the road test until you pass all of your backing test. I did get perfect scores on my pre-trip and in cab tests. The advice I have to give others on passing those tests like I did is to get into a routine and try to name the parts off in the same order every time so you don't forget one. Touch every part that you talk about, and explain what those parts should or shouldn't be.

For example, we are taught that all parts need to be properly mounted and secured, not cracked, bent, or broken, have all bolts present and tight, and are not leaking. All belts should have 1/2 - 3/4 an inch play and shouldn't be worn or frayed. All rubber had no abrasions, bubbles, or cuts (ABC). All glass and lights should be clean and clear and free of illegal tape or stickers. Remember to say the lights are the proper color. (Amber, red, clear, etc. depending on the lights). Remember to name your emergency equipment. You would also do well to treat your mirrors like glass (clean and clear, no illegal tape or stickers) but also add that they are adjusted to you (the driver).

I was told by the instructors that regardless of what part of the truck we test on, we still have to do the coupling and fifth wheel and name all the parts and describe how they should be in working order. Unless you physically remove the glad hands, the rubber grommets on the inside are easy to miss and depending on the tester you may lose credit for missing them. In this way you can also accidentally miss the metal prongs on the electric lines.

If you can't touch a part because it is out of reach, the instructor will likely give you credit if you just point to it and describe what part it is and what you are looking for. In my test, there was no way I could reach the front and rear spring mounts, not the springs, without physically getting underneath the tractor (I had front of truck and the engine compartment). So I pointed to those parts (don't forget the u-bolts!) told the tester what parts they were and what I was looking for, and I was given credit for those parts.

On the in cab, the easiest part to miss is the emergency equipment because it is often out of sight. Name it first and get it out of the way. For the brake tests, you DO need to apply the correct amount of pressure for the applied pressure brake test, hold that pressure for one minute, and tell the instructor that the psi didn't drop more than 4 psi in that minute that you observed. Before even thinking of doing the brake tests, make sure that you have enough air pressure to do them. I complete my brake tests in the following order:

1. Tug tests - tractor then trailer, trailer then tractor, doesn't matter just do them together and remember to do both.

2. Service brake tests - Low gear, pull forward at 5mph and then apply service brakes. Vehicle stopped and shouldn't lurch to the left or right.

3. Governor cut out test - should cut out at 125 psi. By doing this now you will have enough pressure to do the next tests.

4. Turn the engine off. DO NOT TAKE YOUR HAND OFF THE KEY! Flip the battery on but don't start the engine.

5. Static Test - Sit like a lemon, watch the air tanks and count for 1 minute. Do nothing else. Vehicle should lose no more than 3psi in that 1 minute.

6. Applied pressure test - Apply 90 lbs of pressure to the service brakes. Hold the pressure for 1 minute. Tanks shouldn't leak more than 4psi in that one minute.

7. Low pressure alarm - Lights and alarms should come on before 60 psi or half the governor cut out. Fan the brakes to make the pressure drop.

8. Buttons - The tractor and trailer brakes should apply (buttons will "pop out") between 40 and 20 psi. Fan the brakes and wait for them both to pop out. Do NOT touch the buttons while performing this test, or you may fail.

I would also say the name of the test and describe what you are going to do to the truck for each test and what you are looking for while conducting the tests before actually conducting the tests. For example, if you are fanning the brakes and the buttons pop out before you tell the examiner that they should pop out between 20 and 40 psi, you may fail the test.

Hope this helps!

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

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