Flatbed Clothing

Topic 13215 | Page 1

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Nomad Novelist's Comment
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Given that flatbed drivers will be out in the elements often, getting dirty / sweaty while securing loads, I'm curious if anyone's come up with a combo of clothing that works well for them (one for hot weather, another for cold)?

Do you change into a loading / tarping set of clothes you'll get dirty, and then back into something clean when you're ready to drive? Or do you wear coveralls over the same clothes you secure a load and drive in?

What about rain? Do you carry dedicated waterproof rain gear (like a motorcyclist would), or do you just change into dry clothes later?

Footwear? I keep hearing steel toe boots are a must...but do you change into something more comfortable when driving? Do you wear rubber boots when it's raining / snowing?

Do you carry extra pairs of gloves and hats for when it's wet outside?

Sorry for the dumb questions, but I feel like more thought has to go into this when you can't simply go inside and sit in front of the fireplace when you're driving a truck.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Exladytrucker's Comment
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I drove in comfy shoes, slipped in to regular work boots when I needed protection. Merrells or sneakers usually. I also carried slip on waterproof rubber boots. I dressed in layers, outer shell was waterproof light weight rain gear - I think I got it at LL Bean at the time. Everyone's different. I say just think safety first, and then do it as comfortably as you can. Being female, I had less upper body strength, so I used to like gloves that gave me some "purchase" on whatever I needed to move/handle.

Pat M.'s Comment
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Hot days, jeans and a t shirt. Mild cold jeans, t shirt and carhart vest. Cold days I may add a flannel shirt and on really cold days I replace the vest with a jacket. For the rain, if it is really coming down I replace the vest with a light weight rain jacket.

Every day it is jeans and steel toe boots. My feet do not get wet because I take care of the boots with mink oil. I do the same on the leather gloves.

Pat M.'s Comment
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Oh and my boots are on 24/7 unless they get really muddy.

Parrothead66's Comment
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I just keep rain gear handy and put wear it when needed. I also keep a pair of sneakers in the truck but I'm just as comfortable in my boots (but keep a good insole in them) and I have a pair of steel toe Muck Boots that I keep with me. Running regional in the south our winters aren't that bad so I usually just sick with jeans and a shirt (short or long sleeve depending on the weather) but also keep a lite jacket and a coat on board during the winter. If by chance I get soaked I'll change clothes, if it's just hot and sweaty i might change shirts but after I'm loaded I usually try to get my shower as soon as possible (as long as is not a same day delivery) then I'm clean for the drive. I do keep some shorts and t-shirts on hand to wear while driving sometimes. Always have a couple of hats on board and usually 3-4 pairs of gloves.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Parrothead66's Comment
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Definitely light weight rain gear or you'll get so sweaty you'll think your soaking wet

Hot days, jeans and a t shirt. Mild cold jeans, t shirt and carhart vest. Cold days I may add a flannel shirt and on really cold days I replace the vest with a jacket. For the rain, if it is really coming down I replace the vest with a light weight rain jacket.

Every day it is jeans and steel toe boots. My feet do not get wet because I take care of the boots with mink oil. I do the same on the leather gloves.

George A.'s Comment
member avatar

Was just at a terminal talking to an older trucker who had a shirt in great condition from 1985. He has been with his company for well over one million miles. He always said that people commented on how clean and neat he looked when picking up or delivering a load. He told me his success was wearing a short sleeve coveralls in the summer and long sleeve in the winter. He wears little underneath...changes when arrives and changes when leaves...never wears his regular clothes. I will say he is a sharp dresser....not in the coveralls but regular like. Also he buys his coveralls at the thrift shop..... Personally if I dress too heavily I sweat like crazy....so I wear very little, just enough to be safe...in the cab while running it is shorts and slippers and a tank........comfort is paramount....My feet get hot easily and sweat too much to wear shoes for too long. I lose lots of boots and tennis shoes to the buildup of funk so bad that flies die at 50 yards.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Steve_HBG's Comment
member avatar

Pixel:

My answers are based on what I did when I pulled a flatbed from 1979 - 1991.

Given that flatbed drivers will be out in the elements often, getting dirty / sweaty while securing loads, I'm curious if anyone's come up with a combo of clothing that works well for them (one for hot weather, another for cold)?

I wore short-sleeved shirts in the summer, and long-sleeved shirts in the winter, along with a good coat, long johns, and insulated boots.

Do you change into a loading / tarping set of clothes you'll get dirty, and then back into something clean when you're ready to drive? Or do you wear coveralls over the same clothes you secure a load and drive in?

I had coveralls ($40.00 at Tractor Supply).

What about rain? Do you carry dedicated waterproof rain gear (like a motorcyclist would), or do you just change into dry clothes later?

I carried rain gear, but I seldom wore it. Hauling steel that could rust and lumber that needed to stay dry generally kept me indoors for loading and unloading.

Footwear? I keep hearing steel toe boots are a must...but do you change into something more comfortable when driving? Do you wear rubber boots when it's raining / snowing?

I wore steel toed boots when I worked around the trailer.

Do you carry extra pairs of gloves and hats for when it's wet outside?

Yes. Two extra pairs of gloves, but only one extra hat.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

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