How Dangerous Its For A Women To Work As A Truck Driver??

Topic 1327 | Page 1

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Stephanie A.'s Comment
member avatar

Hello eveyone....

Im new at this forum and new at the idea of working as a truck driver, i know that driving a truck its not an easy task, and also i know i will need a lot to learn... i received some calls from some truck companies, and they offer school for driving license and all that, and it seems really good... Something that is convencing me more to do this, its obviously for money, and thinking about that mostly i will be working so i wont have to pay rent or to many bills, so that will help me to pay my debs and save some money.

But diferent ppl says different things, good things and bad things, like good money, and also how dangerous its for a women.. Can someone give me an advise of what should i do? And how dangerous really is this career?

Im thinking about Stevens transport, inc., what do you think about that company? Or theres maybe something better ?

Thank you very much for your help..

Special K, aka Kathy's Comment
member avatar

Well I have been a solo driver for a couple of months and I have yet to be in a situation that I felt unsafe. You have some very helpful drivers out there and you have some butts! Just use common sense and all is good! Best of luck and by the way I love what I do (most of the time, there are those days though lol). Best of luck!!!

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
RedGator's Comment
member avatar

Any job is dangerous. Ive been out here for almost a year and have not been in a bad situation. You learn where to stay, where to park and when and when not to get out of your truck. You just have to be sp Smart about things and use your common sense. I have a friend who trained with Stevens. Very thorough company and by the book. Good company to work for according to him.

Starcar's Comment
member avatar

Lady truckers are getting to be more and more common. And for a good reason !! Companies have figured out that lady drivers take better care of the equipment, we don't stop at ***** bars, and we don't mess with lot lizards. So we tend to make our appointments on time, and we keep a CLEAN truck !!! So us lady drivers are a valuable commodity to the trucking industry. When you are deciding on a trucking company school to go to, remember that you will be spending a year with that company, to pay back your trucking school costs. so choose wisely. ALSO...if you want a lady trainer for your over the road training, BE SURE AND ASK IF THEY WILL HAVE ONE AVAILABLE FOR YOU WHEN YOU ARE DONE WITH SCHOOL> this is very important..as I've seen ladies have to wait a long time, just to get a lady OTR trainer. If you don't mind being trained by a guy, it will be no problem. I personally wouldn't have a problem with a guy, but I'm a strong willed, independent woman. Special K was trained by a really nice guy ( I met up with them)..And I think Redgator had a guy for a trainer. It will come down to "class". If you get a guy who respects you, and really wants to train you and see you succeed, then you have a GREAT trainer. I know that Redgator is becoming a trainer for her company...which I think is STELLAR !!!!!!!!!! So pick your trucking company sponsored training carefully, you will be with that company for a year, if you do it right. Well crap...I got off topic !!! Where have I been ?? Safety...I just posted on another thread about safety...but most of its common sense. walk like you own the world...Don't let anyone close to you. you will lose any advantage if they get within 3 feet. I call that My Air Space.. Don't go to the back of trailers at night for any reason without your tire thumper, or flash light...I don't go there period, at night. Don't walk between trucks...dangerous at anytime. And when you get out of your truck, only take the money you need for what you want, be sure and lock your truck at ALL TIMES. Never get in another truck, unless you know the driver PERSONALLY. I carry a 5 foot walking stick...it comes in handy, and diverts any would be criminals...But I will say, in 15 years of over the road, I have not ever been in what I would call a unsafe situation. Alot has changed over the years, and for the better.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

RedGator's Comment
member avatar

My company soley trains male/male, female/female.

Stephanie A.'s Comment
member avatar

Ladies.. Thank you very much for all your words, are definitely supportiv!.. And helped me a lot.. Im soo decide and anxious to start lol... I'm gonna cal them tomorrow, and also i received a call from C.R England , I'm supposed to call tomorrow too, anyone knows about those companies?? ... And also i was reading in this page things that may affect to be able to get the license and I'm kind of worry, because i had ticket and saw that can be a problem, and also that they look at your credit??? So, i have a big problem then.. Anyways i really hope that can work, and i want to start as soon as possible..

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Sharon S.'s Comment
member avatar

Hi lady truckers....new to this. I've been thinking seriously about cdl school vs company sponsor cdl school. Been in the medical field for 20+ years and have burn out,,,,also experienced a fall and broke my hip which is since repaired and healed. The only decent paying jobs is medical and trucking....had enough of the first. My question is...can a woman with osteoarthritis in feet,knees and back manage in driving? Comeents greatly appreciated!!! Love reading all the posts!!!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Starcar's Comment
member avatar

I didn't know that the trucking schools checked credit...so I'll ask someone else to address that issue. About the ticket...it will depend on what it was for...most of the usual ones will fall in the "no more than 3 in the last 3 years" category, but that is also different with each company. You need to "blanket apply" to all companies...Truck Driving Schools start there, and keep going until you fins a school that you think will work. It doesn't have to be in your city, or your state. most of them have housing...So get out there and throw your hat in the ring....apply EVERYWHERE.....then you narrow down your options by what you want to haul, home time, pay, etc...its not a process that you want to do in a day. That company you go with will be your boss for a year (we push that...after a year you can go where ever you want). So the final decision is really the important one....

Sharon, I share your pain... new hip last year after fracuring my femur ( I'm allergic to titanium), then new knee in November...then knee surgery again in April. Thank goodness I don't have any arthritis anywhere...cuz I've been all broken up from years of horses and motorcycles. I'll tell ya, the one thing that may mess you up in trucking..well theres a few things..I'll list them 1. do you take meds for oyur medical conditions?? they will have to be approved.. 2. does change in climate bother, or inflame your condition ?? You can go from snot to hot desert in a short time trucking...and the winters are brutal for drivers. 3. can you consistantly crawl in and out of a truck, multiple (atleast 8 times) a day? And be able to crawl in and out of a box trailer ?? AND some scompanies expect you to break down pallet loads...not always hard, but repetitive, and usually heavy. I personally refused to "lump" any load...My CDL does not mean Certified Dumb Lumper.

For now thats all I can think of, other than passing any company physical that they may want, or the DOT physical,but you shouldn't have any trouble with that, if your meds are ok. You can't take any meds that may cause drowdiness, dizzyness,..nothing like that...and no sleep meds, either.. So look into all that, and figure that part out. We'll be here to help you all we can !!!!

LADY TRUCK DRIVERS ROCK TH ASPHALT WORLD !!!!!!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Mistelle's Comment
member avatar

I know from what I have done so far that having osteoarthritis would make some things hard. Mostly what I would worry the most about is you getting in and out of the truck. I have a few medical problems myself and that is the one that I worry about the most. The trailer you can always find something to help you up into it. And here is a nice thing about being a lady, most guys are willing to help you if you are nice about it.

I would worry more about the medications that you have to take for it. Even higher doses of ibuprofen (sp?) can make you sleepy. Drowsiness and boredom seem to be the hardest things for me. Boredom comes first, then the drowsiness. Which means a stopping of the truck and climb out that door.

I wish you luck and if you want to talk about it more in depth, send me a message.

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