Struggling With Log Book

Topic 13708 | Page 1

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Travis T.'s Comment
member avatar

I know you can only drive 11 hrs, with 10 hrs of sleeper berth and 3 hrs of breaks ect. How can I maximize my drive time? Also it says you have to have a 34 hr reset for every 7 to 8 days, but I want to drive for several weeks at a time. How do I get around that? I'm an owner operator btw and thanks for any advice

Owner Operator:

An owner-operator is a driver who either owns or leases the truck they are driving. A self-employed driver.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

Michael C.'s Comment
member avatar

I know you can only drive 11 hrs, with 10 hrs of sleeper berth and 3 hrs of breaks ect. How can I maximize my drive time? Also it says you have to have a 34 hr reset for every 7 to 8 days, but I want to drive for several weeks at a time. How do I get around that? I'm an owner operator btw and thanks for any advice

In my short time being OTR so far, best way to maximize drive-time that I've found is keep your rear in the seat and the wheels turning. Avoid stopping for minor things, I always kept something within arms reach to drink or snack on. Most miles I've done in one day since upgrading was 683 in 10h 58m. I pulled into the pilot and got lucky to get the last spot, I wouldn't suggest pushing it that far though it is kind of nerve racking, especially if your near a major city.

As far as the 34h reset, if your able to manage your 70 hour clock right you may never have to take a reset. My first month out I didn't "have" to take a reset but I had a couple of resets in due to waiting for my next load within that month. If you can drive around 9 hours a day you shouldn't run out of time before you start gaining hours back from your recap.

I don't mean to be rude, but I'm just wondering how you can be a O/O and not be solid on managing HOS. If you have any other questions I'll be more than happy to answer what I can.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Owner Operator:

An owner-operator is a driver who either owns or leases the truck they are driving. A self-employed driver.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Travis, the 34 hour break is an option that resets that 70 hour clock. If you drove an average of 8-3/4 hours per day, you would never have a day off, if that's what you want.

Read the rules: if you are doing business about your truck or freight you're hauling, that's On Duty, and it's obvious you need to do On Duty things like do paperwork, fuel, see about mechanical service, etc.

Off duty means just that: during the day there will be times you won't be doing truck stuff - lunch, 30 minute break, waiting, using the restroom, etc. Sleeper is almost the same, only you are in the sleeper area of the truck.

Since you have 14 hours daily, it's hard to maximize your 11 hours driving time. What you are looking for is what you get paid to do: move freight, paid by mileage. You maximize miles, then that will show up in your settlements.

Stay on the interstate as much as possible. Time your driving to avoid rush hour. Calculate which road is fastest from A to B. Make sure your Off Duty activity is noted as Off Duty. (It's easy to forget sometimes to change the clock, like fueling then hitting the restroom.)

But I find all these things are like picking up coins you find on the ground - woo hoo! A dime! Over the long haul, it's hardly worth the effort.

Now get out there and drive so you can get the return on investment you are looking for.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Travis T.'s Comment
member avatar

Michael C. I managed to become an O/O because I saved up for a year and a half and bought my own truck. Taught myself how to drive it then got my cdl , kinda jumped in feet first lol. So I'm learning as I go, hope that answers your question. Thanks Errol V. Your reply will help me a lot.I might be in over my head right now because I didn't have anyone to teach me, but I'm getting it done and hopefully I can get advice from guys like you and Michael in the future. Thanks

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Pat M.'s Comment
member avatar

Learn The Logbook Rules (HOS)

This should get you a good start

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Logbook:

A written or electronic record of a driver's duty status which must be maintained at all times. The driver records the amount of time spent driving, on-duty not driving, in the sleeper berth, or off duty. The enforcement of the Hours Of Service Rules (HOS) are based upon the entries put in a driver's logbook.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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