No Recent Experience, Want To Get Back Into Trucking. Averrit Express

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Tony's Comment
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I looked at the Averrit site and they look like a great company to start out with. Does anyone have any info into this company?

Frito's Comment
member avatar
Best Answer!

I've been with Averitt about 6 months... Here are the highlights of the experience so far: Hired out of CDL school into Averitt truckload. Orientation was organized, professional and informative with paid double occupancy hotel and good food. If I remember correctly they paid about $400 for the several days which included a physical/drug screen.

OTR training is paid at $600/wk for 6 weeks followed by a week of finishing/backing school. I was issued a 2013 international (270,000 mi) that had several bumps and bruises, smelling like a cross between a homeless shelter, a nursing home and an ash tray. I have since cleaned it up and worked out its mechanical issues. I like the truck though it runs heavy on the steers... I'd rather fill up n run but have become careful about fuel management due to weight considerations. All the trucks are automatics with APUs and inverters. I wouldn't have it any other way.

You are issued a transitional fleet manager for a couple weeks to hold your hand ( figuratively speaking) until he/she is convinced you can fly with the group.

Starting pay is .37/mile with typically a $1500 sign on bonus paid in part at 90 days, balance at 6 months. .38/mi at 90 days, .40/at 9 months with further progressive raises. They pay HHG mileage in truckload which in my opinion is a total rip. You drive many miles for free. This will likely be the variable that sends me elsewhere once my year is up unless I find a more suitable position with the organization. Not all positions pay HHG. They have breakdown, unload and layover pay as well as detention pay which often requires weeks to receive. I don't like the delay in detention pay... As I see it I work for Averitt, not the consignee/shipper... If they need to recover funds that's their problem not mine.

I've been averaging about 2000 miles per week, sometimes more, sometimes less, which works out to taking home around $600/ wk after my deductions. Not a lot of money for what really is a lot of work. The benefit package is considered "good". Be ready to drive nights and have disruptions to your sleep cycle. I had a telephone powwow with my fleet manager expressing my frustration with some of the unpaid company sponsored camping trips I've been on ( sitting around). He knows I bust my butt to move this truck and don't stop to fart around at truck stops. My trips have since picked up and have become longer consecutive leg segments. Hopefully this will continue.

The Averitt service centers are great. Some are bigger/better/cleaner/friendlier than others but rarely if ever do I go more than a day without a shower and have only fueled off site a few times. The mechanics are generally accommodating/competent and efficient.

There is a lot if trial by fire, frustrating and criptic Qualcomm communications, sometimes less than helpful/informed weekend/evening dispatchers and absolutely no consistency in the security operations/procedures at the various service centers but all in all I think Averitt is a decent company to start out with and perhaps for the right person to make a career with. They have done essentially everything they've told me they will do. They work hard to see that you get some weekly home time which I know is important to many. You need to be a self starter, an independent and confident thinker and a hard worker and you should be fine here. All in all I'm happy with my decision to join the company and will be glad to answer any further questions.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Consignee:

The customer the freight is being delivered to. Also referred to as "the receiver". The shipper is the customer that is shipping the goods, the consignee is the customer receiving the goods.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

APUs:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

Bucket's Comment
member avatar

I don't have any real info, but I told the school I intend to attend next month, the type job I'm looking for. They gave the name and number for an Averitt recruiter. I called and as of now are at the top of my list. Home weekly decent pay, good equipment, no touch, and high percent drop & hook. I do know there some Averitt drivers that post here. I don't know any way to contact them, maybe they will respond. Good luck, stay safe!

James J.'s Comment
member avatar

I work with Averitt Express, did truckload and now i'm running containers into the ports...what kind of info you need?

Bucket's Comment
member avatar

Hi James, I don't wish to hijack this post, but I'm interested in Averitt. Does what I listed above sound correct? All I have to go on is what the recruiter told me. Volvo with apu and auto. Home weekly decanted no touch mostly drop & hook. Thanks, B

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

Frito's Comment
member avatar
Best Answer!

I've been with Averitt about 6 months... Here are the highlights of the experience so far: Hired out of CDL school into Averitt truckload. Orientation was organized, professional and informative with paid double occupancy hotel and good food. If I remember correctly they paid about $400 for the several days which included a physical/drug screen.

OTR training is paid at $600/wk for 6 weeks followed by a week of finishing/backing school. I was issued a 2013 international (270,000 mi) that had several bumps and bruises, smelling like a cross between a homeless shelter, a nursing home and an ash tray. I have since cleaned it up and worked out its mechanical issues. I like the truck though it runs heavy on the steers... I'd rather fill up n run but have become careful about fuel management due to weight considerations. All the trucks are automatics with APUs and inverters. I wouldn't have it any other way.

You are issued a transitional fleet manager for a couple weeks to hold your hand ( figuratively speaking) until he/she is convinced you can fly with the group.

Starting pay is .37/mile with typically a $1500 sign on bonus paid in part at 90 days, balance at 6 months. .38/mi at 90 days, .40/at 9 months with further progressive raises. They pay HHG mileage in truckload which in my opinion is a total rip. You drive many miles for free. This will likely be the variable that sends me elsewhere once my year is up unless I find a more suitable position with the organization. Not all positions pay HHG. They have breakdown, unload and layover pay as well as detention pay which often requires weeks to receive. I don't like the delay in detention pay... As I see it I work for Averitt, not the consignee/shipper... If they need to recover funds that's their problem not mine.

I've been averaging about 2000 miles per week, sometimes more, sometimes less, which works out to taking home around $600/ wk after my deductions. Not a lot of money for what really is a lot of work. The benefit package is considered "good". Be ready to drive nights and have disruptions to your sleep cycle. I had a telephone powwow with my fleet manager expressing my frustration with some of the unpaid company sponsored camping trips I've been on ( sitting around). He knows I bust my butt to move this truck and don't stop to fart around at truck stops. My trips have since picked up and have become longer consecutive leg segments. Hopefully this will continue.

The Averitt service centers are great. Some are bigger/better/cleaner/friendlier than others but rarely if ever do I go more than a day without a shower and have only fueled off site a few times. The mechanics are generally accommodating/competent and efficient.

There is a lot if trial by fire, frustrating and criptic Qualcomm communications, sometimes less than helpful/informed weekend/evening dispatchers and absolutely no consistency in the security operations/procedures at the various service centers but all in all I think Averitt is a decent company to start out with and perhaps for the right person to make a career with. They have done essentially everything they've told me they will do. They work hard to see that you get some weekly home time which I know is important to many. You need to be a self starter, an independent and confident thinker and a hard worker and you should be fine here. All in all I'm happy with my decision to join the company and will be glad to answer any further questions.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Consignee:

The customer the freight is being delivered to. Also referred to as "the receiver". The shipper is the customer that is shipping the goods, the consignee is the customer receiving the goods.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

APUs:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

Frito's Comment
member avatar

Regarding drop and hook... It happens... Often... But " mostly"? Not in my experience.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

Keith W.'s Comment
member avatar

Frito, PM sent.

KW.

James J.'s Comment
member avatar

Frito nailed it pretty good...I do make more doing port runs but that is local.

Tony's Comment
member avatar

Thanks Bucket,Frito, and James, That basicly somes up everything i wanted to know, just one other thing. can you relocate with Averrit once you start working for them?

Tony's Comment
member avatar

Frito you made Lol with, it smells like a cross between a homeless shelter and a Nursing home. rofl-3.gif

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