2 Truck Driving Job Offers From TransAm And May Trucking?

Topic 16131 | Page 11

Page 11 of 11 Previous Page Go To Page:
Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Kerry, I enjoy your comments.

You use the word “intend”. What you intend to do may change when and if you start driving. It will be interesting to see how you progress and if what you “intend” has changed when you get your first year in. I know many of my preconceived notions changed when I was gently corrected by instructors and especially the experienced drivers right here on TT

Kerry L.'s Comment
member avatar

Kerry, we have an extensive collection of materials on this subject. In fact, a sizeable portion of our materials will help you understand this a little better. So I'm not going to create new materials just yet. Instead, I'll point you to four amazing resources we already have. Look this over and then come back with any questions you may have and we'll be happy to clarify.

As you go through these materials, ask yourself, "What can I learn about the trucking industry that might change my point of view on this subject?" I believe you'll discover quite a list of excellent reasons to stick with your first company for a minimum of one full year no matter what:

Episode 4: Why Stick With Your First Company One Full Year?

The Benefits Of Staying With Your Starter Company Beyond One Year

Four Traps That New Truck Drivers Fall Into

What It Takes To Be A Top Tier Driver

We're not suggesting that anyone sacrifice their health, nor their mental, physical, or financial wellbeing for the sake of staying with one company for an extended period. What we're suggesting is that it's in your best interest to do so. Once you understand the big picture of how the trucking industry works and what it takes to be successful in this industry, you'll see the logic behind our philosophy.

Sounds good. Thank you for pointing me in the direction of that content.

Kerry L.'s Comment
member avatar

Kerry, I enjoy your comments.

You use the word “intend”. What you intend to do may change when and if you start driving. It will be interesting to see how you progress and if what you “intend” has changed when you get your first year in. I know many of my preconceived notions changed when I was gently corrected by instructors and especially the experienced drivers right here on TT

Hey Bruce,

I am glad that my comments are ones that you enjoy. It feels good that I am able to positively contribute without having any experience as a truck driver, up to now.

I shared with Davy in a posted comment that it is the rookie drivers like yourself that I see pushing through adversity and finding success en route to becoming experienced drivers that inspire me. I am motivated more by reading about your successes and perseverance than by an old vet who has been doing it for years. So, if I ever push back on something you say, it is most definitely not from lack of respect.

I have no doubt whatsoever that between now and the time I am given my own truck at a company that things will change. Nothing in life is certain and surprises always come from one source or another. Family, friends, co-workers, experienced drivers, content contributors here, and countless other people will have an influence on me. What I perceive to need from a company now could be entirely different by the time I complete training. That's just the way life is. In the Marine Corps, we had a slogan for this: Improvise, adapt, and overcome. I am fairly certain that this can and will translate to trucking. I am sure that you have many an example where you have had to utilize that type of thinking. If what I intend has changed after my first year...

It may change several times before I complete my first year. I am not in the game of predictions, so I won't even try to foresee what life has in store for me a year+ from now. What I do know is that there are certain things that I can control. I can learn as much as possible about each company with which I have submitted an application so that when I receive that invite to orientation, I know what to expect with that company. Training, pay structure, freight type(s), running lanes, home time, etc will all be well researched so that I am not surprised by some aspect of how the company operates. I can control with which company I choose to hire on. I can control how I choose to run the truck, once I complete training.

YouTube is replete with videos of drivers quitting at a company because of lack of home time, low pay, or a training structure the driver didn't like. Those are surprises I will avoid by researching a company before I get there. It's life's wrinkles and surprises that I can't research and anticipate.

I am trying as best I can to educate myself as best I can so that I have as few preconceived false notions as possible. In fact, let me pick your brain. Please share any preconceived notions you had that were corrected by your trainer, or any experienced driver.

If I don't make it to one year as a driver or if I change companies before reaching one year, it will be because life brought into my life something I didn't anticipate and a change had to be made. So, whether it be Pride Transport, Dutch Maid Logistics, May Trucking Company, Tyson Foods, CFI, West Side Transport, Western Dairy Transport, or any other company with which I have a submitted application, I will be going in with the mindset to work through problems. I have decided that problems with the company can be addressed by communicating with the company. I look forward to being that experienced driver at a company that my DM/FM knows, "We have Kerry working on that, so it'll be done." I look forward to eventually being the experienced driver who is training drivers fresh out of school or even those who tried one or two other companies. If those things don't happen, it's because life throws at us unexpected things. Roll with the punches and move on.

Thank you for your insight. Always remember that someone, somewhere is looking up to you and modeling him/herself after you.

~Kerry

BMI:

Body mass index (BMI)

BMI is a formula that uses weight and height to estimate body fat. For most people, BMI provides a reasonable estimate of body fat. The BMI's biggest weakness is that it doesn't consider individual factors such as bone or muscle mass. BMI may:

  • Underestimate body fat for older adults or other people with low muscle mass
  • Overestimate body fat for people who are very muscular and physically fit

It's quite common, especially for men, to fall into the "overweight" category if you happen to be stronger than average. If you're pretty strong but in good shape then pay no attention.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Kerry L.'s Comment
member avatar

Kerry, we have an extensive collection of materials on this subject. In fact, a sizeable portion of our materials will help you understand this a little better. So I'm not going to create new materials just yet. Instead, I'll point you to four amazing resources we already have. Look this over and then come back with any questions you may have and we'll be happy to clarify.

As you go through these materials, ask yourself, "What can I learn about the trucking industry that might change my point of view on this subject?" I believe you'll discover quite a list of excellent reasons to stick with your first company for a minimum of one full year no matter what:

Episode 4: Why Stick With Your First Company One Full Year?

The Benefits Of Staying With Your Starter Company Beyond One Year

Four Traps That New Truck Drivers Fall Into

What It Takes To Be A Top Tier Driver

We're not suggesting that anyone sacrifice their health, nor their mental, physical, or financial wellbeing for the sake of staying with one company for an extended period. What we're suggesting is that it's in your best interest to do so. Once you understand the big picture of how the trucking industry works and what it takes to be successful in this industry, you'll see the logic behind our philosophy.

I have read through the material for which you provided links.

The advice given is not exclusive to trucking. Most people who enter the trucking industry have worked for years in other industries. I doubt that a high percentage were job hoppers before entering trucking. Why does it seem like such a high percentage of new drivers become job hoopers? Or, am I overestimating the percentage of new drivers who bounce around within that first year?

The advice provided is life advice that is well-suited for any new employee, at any company, in any industry. I am not trying to blow my own horn here, but one thing I know about myself is that I always stand out at any job I have had because of my work ethic. It has always impressed supervisors that I figure out ways to get things done in the time allotted. I am never the fastest, never the smartest, and not always the hardest working; but, I am that guy who produces every day. I am also that guy who will do whatever is asked of him.

I absolutely know that this will translate to my career as a truck driver. This is why I spend so much time researching companies to find out everything that I can about each company with which I applied. Once it comes time to head to orientation, I refuse to have another experience like I had at TransAm. I will have a firm grasp of training expectations at the company before going to orientation. I will fully understand the pay structure and all of its intricacies. I will understand the lanes this company runs and this company typically expects drivers to run.

I have no doubt that I will experience the same rookie mistakes as any other driver. I will have moments where I wonder what I am doing. This career that I am attempting to take on is unlike anything I have done before. It will be a huge change for me not having a boss to turn to and say, "What do you need me to do now?" But, I also know that having control and command of my own work to do it the way that I see fit, to be able to see a problem and figure out on my own how to fix it, those things are motivating. I just have to get hired on somewhere now and go to work.

~Kerry

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Page 11 of 11 Previous Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

This topic has the following tags:

May Trucking TransAm Advice For New Truck Drivers Choosing A Trucking Company First Solo Months On The Road
Click on any of the buttons above to view topics with that tag, or you can view a list of all forum tags here.

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More