REALLY Wanting This Career, Mental Disorder (schizophrenia) May Be A Problem, Help?

Topic 1667 | Page 1

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Martin B.'s Comment
member avatar

Hello everybody,

I have been really wanting this career for a while now and just in the past 6 months have finally got the ball rolling for my start of this great career. After doing some research I found that having schizophrenia can be a major complication. I am currently trying to get into a company sponsored program and am just sorta lost at this moment and need some help. I have had schizophrenia since I was 14 and in the past four years have learned to manage it very well, (I'm 23), I can manage it enough to where it won't effect my day to day activities, with only a slight hiccup every great once in a while, which still don't affect my ability for activities. I am currently disabled for it, but would like to get off disability and into a trucking carrier. I am not sure of how to go about getting the right documentation to prove I am stable enough to drive truck. I have talked to my recruiter and he is currently seeing what he could do. But in the mean time I would like any opinion that would help me grasp this situation a lot better. Feel free to ask any questions that would help give me your most valued advice. Thanks. (Ohh, and by the way I have not had a therapists or any mental doctor in 2 years, and that was only for a week, in the past 4 years that was the only time seeing a doctor for it.)

Starcar's Comment
member avatar

Martin, one of the big problems you may have is the meds you take. The feds are really picky about those. You can ask your doctor to check to see if your meds will pass the federal regulations, or if he could change you to ones that do. So theres a starting point for you, and its an important one, since every trucking company will be asking the same thing about your meds. Keep at it, to see if you can get into trucking...And keep on this site...we'll help all we can.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Tracey K.'s Comment
member avatar

StarCar is right. But keep at it. You don't seem like a quitter to me. Great job my friend.good-luck-2.gif

My prayers are for healing for you. Do all you have to do to make it work. Stick with it.

And please keep us informed. We will help as much as we can.

I would check with your last doctor or therapist to see if they will give you a statement of ability to work. And do check with your doctors to see if their are any reasons as to type of medication if any that would keep you from this.

I will ask. What does a hiccup look like? You say your have control and i believe you can have control. I have done a little readying on the subject but not a great deal. Its is like a major case of Bipolar? I guess? I know you can function.

I think it is just a blessing to be hearing from you. What your are doing takes a great deal of courage and grit. Just like John Wayne. We might have to give you a nickname if that is alright.confused.gif

The fact that the company is trying to help is pretty cool too. Sounds like you have a great support system in place. My hat is off to you for sure. I wish you the best of luck.

Ask us more questions too.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Martin, welcome to the forum!

StarCar is right, the meds may be what trips you up, but I've seen this many times before and was able to help a fellow with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder get hired after he had been rejected by another trucking company because of his meds. You will find that there are some drugs that just are not acceptable to the D.O.T. And then there are also specific drugs that certain companies will not allow. So you can do this, but you may have to search around and put in just a little more effort than someone else, but I think you seem like the type who will try his best to make it work out. Best of luck to ya! Don't give up too easily, keep at it and you will find a away in to the industry.

Please keep us posted on how it's going for you.

Martin B.'s Comment
member avatar

Hello again,

Thanks for all you great advice. As for meds, I have not taken any meds in about 3 years, the last one I was on had some pretty bad side effects so I tried going without them and it has worked out for three years, and to Tracey K. a hiccup to me is like I loose motivation at times, but still do the job I am required to do and do it the way it supposed to, it would just seem that I am not happy at all at the time, but in no way has it affected my work, (when I did work), as long as I am required to do the job, I will do it to the specifications that is required. The "hiccup" passes after a short while, the longest I have had it last was about a day and a half. I don't really think it would affect my job performance or interaction with the people, I have learned to hide it when necessary to where people don't worry about me until it passes. As for being alone on the road, that is one of the main reasons I choose this career field, I like to be alone, but still like to meet new people, so interacting for the loads shouldn't be a problem. Is there anything that might affect any of these issues? From an experienced point of view, what is the most psychological problem you have had to deal with, (e.g. dealing with people, traffic, being alone, partners, dispatchers), that way I have a more general understanding of people who have been there. Also have you ever heard of a company paying for the psych evaluation for the person applying, because they can be somewhat pricey. Thanks again. (Ohh, and Tracey K. it would be alright if you gave me a nickname, it's really just up you, I don't mind)

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

guyjax(Guy Hodges)'s Comment
member avatar

Hello again,

Thanks for all you great advice. As for meds, I have not taken any meds in about 3 years, the last one I was on had some pretty bad side effects so I tried going without them and it has worked out for three years, and to Tracey K. a hiccup to me is like I loose motivation at times, but still do the job I am required to do and do it the way it supposed to, it would just seem that I am not happy at all at the time, but in no way has it affected my work, (when I did work), as long as I am required to do the job, I will do it to the specifications that is required. The "hiccup" passes after a short while, the longest I have had it last was about a day and a half. I don't really think it would affect my job performance or interaction with the people, I have learned to hide it when necessary to where people don't worry about me until it passes. As for being alone on the road, that is one of the main reasons I choose this career field, I like to be alone, but still like to meet new people, so interacting for the loads shouldn't be a problem. Is there anything that might affect any of these issues? From an experienced point of view, what is the most psychological problem you have had to deal with, (e.g. dealing with people, traffic, being alone, partners, dispatchers), that way I have a more general understanding of people who have been there. Also have you ever heard of a company paying for the psych evaluation for the person applying, because they can be somewhat pricey. Thanks again. (Ohh, and Tracey K. it would be alright if you gave me a nickname, it's really just up you, I don't mind)

Stress can increase the episodes And can make each one ,when it happens,very bad indeed. There is no way around it. You WILL have stress on the road. Traffic, ignorant people and even the people you work with your company. Its not a question of IF you have stress but really how much stress you can take before you brake.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Martin B.'s Comment
member avatar

Thank you guyjax,

That is a good point, and I am pretty sure that I can handle the stress when it comes around to it. I have been working on controlling it when I do have stress and have managed to handle a good amount of stress. My mother is actually living with me at the moment and it has helped me learn to manage stress caused by people, (lol), and the stress on the road, like other drivers, I have no problem with, even during a episode. Driving calms my nerves and actually helps me a lot with my schizophrenia, but only time will tell when I actually get into the career field. All I can do is go as prepared as I can be.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Well, congratulations Martin! You've roused our friend Guyjax from the dead! Man GuyJax, how are ya? We've been missing your common sense no B.S. advice around here for some time now. Hope all is well with you and it sure was good to see your face up here in the forum again!

Cool Joe's Comment
member avatar

DOT Guidelines Regarding Psychological Conditions

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Tracey K.'s Comment
member avatar

DOT Guidelines Regarding Psychological Conditions

Joseph, Thank you for this information. I just finished reading it myself. Great job!

Martin, take a look at this. It will answer your questions, but it also gives you something to go on. What I read is a slim possibility, but it is there. Read through it carefully. If you have questions, ask. We are here to help anyway we can.

Thank you again Joseph.

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
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