DEER SEASON! Truck Drivers, Have You Hit One Yet?

Topic 1721 | Page 2

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Steven N. (aka Wilson)'s Comment
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Tracey, I am starting to see that more and more about the safety. The ever changing surroundings while driving. I was surfing Youtube the other day and somehow I found this video called "Expect the Unexpected". It was a trucker with a dash cam. He was traveling in the second lane of an 8-lane highway (4 lanes each direction) and all appeared to be normal. Then suddenly the traffic in front of him was at a stand-still. Apparently he didn't see that it was standing still in time and he ended up hitting about 3 cars trying to avoid crushing the car in his lane.

It was a scary site seeing how this developed. Here in Germany, with no speed limits for cars on the autobahns in most places, there is either an unwritten law or perhaps a written law that says that as soon as you see a jam or traffic in front of you coming to a crawl or even a stand-still, you have to turn on your 4-way flashers to warn all those behind you that are still going at "normal" speeds. There could be someone coming up behind you in the left lane going (for Stateside folks) an unbelievable speed. If cars like this are not warned, you could have a tragic mess. That is what really caught my eye in that video. The truck driver may have been looking away at the wrong moment, who knows? It wasn't shown. But I was watching and not seeing a single car with 4-way flashers on and just sitting there in the traffic lanes literally parked sent chills up and down my spine. I put myself in the driver's seat of that truck for a second thinking what if that was me? I tell you it will put the fear of God in you really quick. I am going to have to learn to watch for bonehead drivers a lot more when I get back. I will sure miss the orderly driving and drivers of Germany really quick. Don't get me wrong. They have their share of boneheads here, too. But this Youtube video was down right scary! shocked.png

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

I almost hit a deer once. Was night driving on a state highway. Went around a curve and there's a deer standing right in the middle of the road. Luckily I saw it in time and slowed down an went around him.

My friend who made a bonehead move by leasing a truck at Central hit a deer once at night. It cost him 1400$ in damage! Its hard to imagine that a deer can do so much damage, but then you also gotta remember that the trucks are basically made out of plastic.

Alec O'Farrell's Comment
member avatar
Great Answer!

Here in SE Iowa ya gotta REALLY watch out for the deer, lately they've been hanging out on the roads during the day in groups of 5 or more, and it's more difficult IMO to spot them during the daytime because they blend so well with trees etc during the daytime. Of course they're still out at night... The rule of thumb about deer: "Where there is ONE deer, there are bound to be MANY deer".

Deer damage can cost a LOT more than people ever imagine.

My dad was hauling cattle (our own personal cattle, not commercial) to our new place some 6 years ago and a deer ran into the side of the truck, actually it bounced off of the front bumper then slammed into the side of the truck. 6yrs later I'm fixing the truck, spent over $1000 already on the front of the truck, that includes bumper, lights, etc. Fixing the side of the truck would run another grand or so. We never realized how much damage it really DID do until I started pulling it apart to fix stuff...

I can't really give much advice about handling deer on the road, other than watch for the eyes, and slow down when you see 'em. They're not so likely to be along busy highways, but that doesn't mean they aren't there.

Fatsquatch 's Comment
member avatar

I haven't hit any yet. *knock wood* I've had a couple close calls though. One night a couple months ago I was cruising up CA-44 just past US395. Came around a curve, and there was a deer curled up like it was taking a nap right in the middle of my lane. Thankfully this was at like 2am, so there was nobody else on the road for a bazillion miles in either direction, so I had plenty of room to swerve into the other lane and avoid the stupid thing. It didn't even flinch as I drove past, just kinda looked at me like "hey, I'm sleeping here!" Another time about...oh, 6 months or so ago I was heading home across Snoqualmie Pass, and just at the bottom of the pass outside of Cle Elem I saw the little box truck ahead of me suddenly jump on his brakes going into a curve. I hit the Jakes and started braking, and as I came around the curve I saw what the fuss was about. A big bull elk and about a half dozen cows were strolling across the freeway. The part that freaked me out was the bull stopped, turned to look at the box truck, then lowered its head and started pawing at the roadway like it was going to charge! Glad I wasn't the one that ****ed him off, elk are nasty. Tasty, but mean.

Tracey K.'s Comment
member avatar

Great post. Great stories and information.

Yes, sometimes they cause BIG damage and sometimes they don't. Looking for those little green eyes is something I do all the time. And yes, where their is one, their is usually another. You will see the Mother first most times and then her children. This is the time of season that she is trainer Her offspring. She is teaching them about the wild in nature and I believe about the wild of humans. Though I do wonder about that sometimes. You would think by now they would know to stay away from the roads. But, like chickens, they need to get to the other side.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Tracey K.'s Comment
member avatar
Best Answer!

Tips for Driving in Deer Country Vehicles kill hundreds of deer each year in Washington. Deer will cross roads at any time of day or night, creating a hazard for the vehicles, passengers, and deer. More than half of all deer/vehicle collisions occur in October and November. The rut (mating season) and peak days for hunting may account for this.

Here are driving tips to help prevent collisions:

  • Deer are most active at dawn and dusk. Be especially watchful during these times.
  • One deer crossing the road may be a sign that more deer are about to cross. Watch for other deer— they will move fast to catch up with leaders, mothers, or mates and may not pay attention to traffic.
  • When you see brake lights, it could be because the driver ahead of you has spotted a deer. Stay alert as you drive by the spot, as more deer could try to cross.
  • Wonder why the person ahead is driving so slowly? The driver may know where to slow down and be extra alert for deer. Don’t be too quick to pass, and watch out.
  • Take note of deer-crossing signs and drive accordingly. They were put there for a reason.
  • Try to drive more slowly at night, giving yourself time to see a deer with your headlights. Lowering the brightness of your dashboard lights slightly will make it easier to see deer.
  • Be especially watchful when traveling near steep roadside banks. Deer will pop onto the roadway with little or no warning.
  • Be aware that headlights confuse deer and may cause them to move erratically or stop. Young animals in particular do not recognize that vehicles are a threat.
  • Deer hooves slip on pavement and a deer may fall in front of your vehicle just when you think it is jumping away.
  • Deer whistles, small devices that can be mounted on your vehicle, emit a shrill sound that supposedly alerts deer nearby. (Humans cannot hear the sound.) How well the devices work is not scientifically known.

If a collision with a deer seems imminent, take your foot off the accelerator and brake lightly. But—and this is critical—keep a firm hold on the steering wheel while keeping the vehicle straight. Do not swerve in an attempt to miss the deer. Insurance adjusters claim that more car damage and personal injury is caused when drivers attempt to avoid collision with a deer and instead collide with guardrails or roll down grades.

If you accidentally hit and kill a deer, try to move the animal off the road—providing you can do so in complete safety. Otherwise, report the location of the deer’s body to the city, county, or state highway department with jurisdiction for the road. If no action is taken, contact the local police department, and the agency will arrange for the body to be removed. This will prevent scavengers from being attracted onto the road, and eliminate a potential traffic hazard. If the deer is wounded, call the non-emergency number of the local police department and describe the animal’s location. Emphasize that the injured deer is a traffic hazard to help ensure that someone will com`e quickly.

Woody's Comment
member avatar

Two days ago I was driving home at about 3am. On a 4 lane road that is through a heavily populated residential area was a deer standing in the middle of the highway. I was able to avoid it but yes, they will show up anywhere!

A couple years ago my wife and I had gone out for a ride on our motorcycle. We were riding home at dusk on some rural back roads and I was traveling about 20 mph. I stopped counting deer at 50!!! Several of them were no more than 10ft from the road, and the sound of my bike (it's not quiet) did not seem to bother them in the least. During the same season we were on a highway again heading home around dusk. I was going about 70mph when we rounded a curve to see a big buck standing in the road. Talk about a pucker moment lol.

Here is a crazy video you just gotta watch. The deer actually walks away!

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=uG_D5OmL6M4

Woody

Alec O'Farrell's Comment
member avatar

Tips for Driving in Deer Country Vehicles kill hundreds of deer each year in Washington. Deer will cross roads at any time of day or night, creating a hazard for the vehicles, passengers, and deer. More than half of all deer/vehicle collisions occur in October and November. The rut (mating season) and peak days for hunting may account for this.

Here are driving tips to help prevent collisions:

  • Deer are most active at dawn and dusk. Be especially watchful during these times.
  • One deer crossing the road may be a sign that more deer are about to cross. Watch for other deer— they will move fast to catch up with leaders, mothers, or mates and may not pay attention to traffic.
  • When you see brake lights, it could be because the driver ahead of you has spotted a deer. Stay alert as you drive by the spot, as more deer could try to cross.
  • Wonder why the person ahead is driving so slowly? The driver may know where to slow down and be extra alert for deer. Don’t be too quick to pass, and watch out.
  • Take note of deer-crossing signs and drive accordingly. They were put there for a reason.
  • Try to drive more slowly at night, giving yourself time to see a deer with your headlights. Lowering the brightness of your dashboard lights slightly will make it easier to see deer.
  • Be especially watchful when traveling near steep roadside banks. Deer will pop onto the roadway with little or no warning.
  • Be aware that headlights confuse deer and may cause them to move erratically or stop. Young animals in particular do not recognize that vehicles are a threat.
  • Deer hooves slip on pavement and a deer may fall in front of your vehicle just when you think it is jumping away.
  • Deer whistles, small devices that can be mounted on your vehicle, emit a shrill sound that supposedly alerts deer nearby. (Humans cannot hear the sound.) How well the devices work is not scientifically known.

If a collision with a deer seems imminent, take your foot off the accelerator and brake lightly. But—and this is critical—keep a firm hold on the steering wheel while keeping the vehicle straight. Do not swerve in an attempt to miss the deer. Insurance adjusters claim that more car damage and personal injury is caused when drivers attempt to avoid collision with a deer and instead collide with guardrails or roll down grades.

If you accidentally hit and kill a deer, try to move the animal off the road—providing you can do so in complete safety. Otherwise, report the location of the deer’s body to the city, county, or state highway department with jurisdiction for the road. If no action is taken, contact the local police department, and the agency will arrange for the body to be removed. This will prevent scavengers from being attracted onto the road, and eliminate a potential traffic hazard. If the deer is wounded, call the non-emergency number of the local police department and describe the animal’s location. Emphasize that the injured deer is a traffic hazard to help ensure that someone will com`e quickly.

By the way, in Iowa, it's illegal to even TOUCH a deer, if you hit it or not. New law - you can be thrown in jail or have your license revoked for just touching one without a salvage tag, or unless you are a law enforcement officer or the likes. It's dumb, but that's what I was informed by the local DNR warden and the law enforcement office...

Chances are though that no one will know you pulled it off of the road.

It's the same thing as making sure your license plates are perfectly clean and readable and you live 6 miles on gravel/dirt roads... No one enforces it, but just thought I'd put it out there so people are aware of it.

Woody's Comment
member avatar

Good news, someone finally has a solution for the problem!!!

http://youtube.com/watch?v=RFCrJleggrI

rofl-3.gifrofl-3.gifrofl-3.gif

Chris 's Comment
member avatar

Few months ago I got two in one shot. I never swerved but i got on the binders enough to shift my load of shingles two inches forward. The one deer slipped in front of the truck and went under got it with every tire. the other deflected off the corner of the bumper.

Had a crack in the bumper and that was it. Only reason i got on the binders is i was on two lane road late at night and i hadn't seen a car in the last hour and half. So i knew it was safe to get on the brakes and try to stop.

Night dispatch thought it was hilarious, saftey was like meh its just a bumper.

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