Shifting The Semi Correctly (10 Speed)

Topic 17984 | Page 1

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John P.'s Comment
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I hope one of you guys can help me out here on something. So say you're driving down down the highway in 10th gear and you get a red light so do you stick it in neutral and then stop and then put it in 1st or 2nd or do you guys just hit the clutch and then stop and put it into gear. Also one other thing so if you have to stop real quick I know you obviously need to hit the clutch and brake hard but what if you're in 10th gear then do you have to put it all the way back in first then? Just part of the unsynchronized shifting that I'm not understanding I think. Silly question for you guys but I'm just learning how to run the semi's on the farm right now.

Cwc's Comment
member avatar

Generally you won't find red lights on the highway. But if you do need to stop suddenly you obviously hit the brakes... After that it depends, did you need to come to a complete stop? If so the gear you took off in the first place would be where to start. If you only needed to slow down you can restart from the appropriate gear.And to guesstimate that look at your speedometer... the numbers you see listed 35 45 ect. 3+5=5 4×5=9th gear.

Cwc's Comment
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And no.. you never put it into neutral to slow down... Always do it in gear.. downshifting. So if time allows once you drop down to 50 go to 9th remember guesstimate.. brake drop gear brake drop gear.

John P.'s Comment
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One other thing if you're already braking for the red light and your in 10th gear then it turns green and your going to slow for 10th then what happens because you can't flip the selector into low range and stick it in 5th can you?

Cwc's Comment
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Yeah you can flip the selector put it into neutral and back into 10th or 5th rather.

Rick S.'s Comment
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Really trying to figure out the best/right way to answer this.

If you're "cruising down the highway", and you get a Red Traffic Light - if you've been paying attention to the SMITH SYSTEM TRAINING that pretty much every company and school gives - you would have noticed the light was "stale" and had already been preparing for it to change.

If you get "caught by surprise" and have to "panic stop" for a light, then obviously, you would push the clutch in and nail the brake. When you push the clutch in - you'll put the transmission in N. When you are ready to start up again - you will depress the clutch ALL THE WAY (so the "clutch brake" engages and stops the input shaft from spinning), and select the gear you want to start in - making sure you have switch the H/L switch back to LOW so you don't end up in 6th gear and STALL as you release the clutch.

Are you in school - in training? At what point of your "learning journey" are you? Messing with semi's "on the farm" is ok - but you really want someone to teach you the "finer points" of shifting and driving - before dealing with red lights.

This is the textbook they used, at the County VoTech I got my CDL training at. Pretty decent book for a novice - as books go.

What are your plans? Drive for "the farm" - or go to school and/or drive for a company?

Rick

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
John P.'s Comment
member avatar

Really trying to figure out the best/right way to answer this.

If you're "cruising down the highway", and you get a Red Traffic Light - if you've been paying attention to the SMITH SYSTEM TRAINING that pretty much every company and school gives - you would have noticed the light was "stale" and had already been preparing for it to change.

If you get "caught by surprise" and have to "panic stop" for a light, then obviously, you would push the clutch in and nail the brake. When you push the clutch in - you'll put the transmission in N. When you are ready to start up again - you will depress the clutch ALL THE WAY (so the "clutch brake" engages and stops the input shaft from spinning), and select the gear you want to start in - making sure you have switch the H/L switch back to LOW so you don't end up in 6th gear and STALL as you release the clutch.

Are you in school - in training? At what point of your "learning journey" are you? Messing with semi's "on the farm" is ok - but you really want someone to teach you the "finer points" of shifting and driving - before dealing with red lights.

This is the textbook they used, at the County VoTech I got my CDL training at. Pretty decent book for a novice - as books go.

What are your plans? Drive for "the farm" - or go to school and/or drive for a company?

Rick

Right ok, yeah I can drive the semi's on country roads to load them up at the grain bins just fine but when I start hauling to the elevator I need to know this all for sure because I don't want to risk others lives because I wasn't sure on something.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
John P.'s Comment
member avatar

Yeah you can flip the selector put it into neutral and back into 10th or 5th rather.

So you can go from 10th to 5th or 6th by just putting it in neutral and sticking it in gear at the right speed? Thanks for the help also

Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

Right ok, yeah I can drive the semi's on country roads to load them up at the grain bins just fine but when I start hauling to the elevator I need to know this all for sure because I don't want to risk others lives because I wasn't sure on something.

I don't want to get the grey cloud on an otherwise sunny day. But if you are going to operate on public roads, around other people - you want to try and get either some formal training (as in school) or have one of the guys that has experience put you through a crash course.

Farmers/employees and Farm Vehicles are typically "exempt" from needing a CDL (in most states, in most cases) - but if you do need to get a CDL - you are going to have to be pretty proficient in order to pass the skills/road test. This is not something you want to be "guessing at".

Rick

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
John P.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Right ok, yeah I can drive the semi's on country roads to load them up at the grain bins just fine but when I start hauling to the elevator I need to know this all for sure because I don't want to risk others lives because I wasn't sure on something.

double-quotes-end.png

I don't want to get the grey cloud on an otherwise sunny day. But if you are going to operate on public roads, around other people - you want to try and get either some formal training (as in school) or have one of the guys that has experience put you through a crash course.

Farmers/employees and Farm Vehicles are typically "exempt" from needing a CDL (in most states, in most cases) - but if you do need to get a CDL - you are going to have to be pretty proficient in order to pass the skills/road test. This is not something you want to be "guessing at".

Rick

I have operated on public roads to get to the bins but I haven't been on the highway yet, I still have plenty of time to keep learning and get better with all factors in running the semi's don't worry I'm not putting others at danger lol, maybe if I was just thrown out there on it but I'm not but I was hoping to hear one of you guys explain this question I had and I got the explanation so thank you sir.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
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