The Promised HOW STARCAR LEARNED TO BACK UP STORY AND INSTRUCTIONS

Topic 197 | Page 1

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Starcar's Comment
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Ok, I had driven alot before TSB and I decided to buy a truck and go OTR. But most of my driving experience was farm, logging...stuff like that, and I didn't have to learn to bump a dock. The worst I had was pullin' up to a cattle ramp on the off side. So When I went OTR , TSB taught me bunches, but said I'd have to teach myself how to back up. I would go to the back of the parking lot, and practice, practice practice...and all I got was frustrated...I'd over correct, EVERY time. Well I was doing my usual, when this little old man walked over to the truck. I was ready to cuss him out for pointing out my obvious mistakes. But he said, " would you like a different way to learn to back up ? I said YES, since nothing was working for me. Here's what he told me: Place your hands**palm up** on the bottom of the steering wheel. When you want the trailer duals to go left, move your left hand up. When you want the trailer duals to go right, move your right hand up. The position you have your hands will not let you over correct...your arm won't move that way. Also, look at your trailer DUALS...not at the end of your trailer. You want the tires to be in the right place..the end of the trailer will be where the tires put it. I've been driving for over 15 years, and I STILL back up with my hands in that position. Its so easy, you don't have to do a double process mentally.. It may take some practice, but its soooo easy... Trust me. AND slow is the only way to back up.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

kayakngal's Comment
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I think I understand. You're saying put my hands, palms facing me, at the bottom of the steering wheel with my hands against the backside of the steering wheel and, if I want my tandems to go left I would turn the wheel using my left hand (from the 6 o'clock position toward 9 then 12)?

Or, are your hands in specific places? For instance; left hand at 7 o'clock and right at 5 o'clock?

Or do I have this totally messed up?

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Pebbles (Juelma N)'s Comment
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I think I understand. You're saying put my hands, palms facing me, at the bottom of the steering wheel with my hands against the backside of the steering wheel and, if I want my tandems to go left I would turn the wheel using my left hand (from the 6 o'clock position toward 9 then 12)?

Or, are your hands in specific places? For instance; left hand at 7 o'clock and right at 5 o'clock?

Or do I have this totally messed up?

Lmao dont worry or over think it. You will get it and find your own ways of doing things. But remember this over thinking is bad very bad. Thats what will mess you up believe.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Starcar's Comment
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Kayakngal...you have it right. Curl your hands around the steering wheel, palms up. This you can try in your car...And because you have your hands on the bottom of the steering wheel, the position of your arms won't let you over steer !!!

Special K, aka Kathy's Comment
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I am going to try this! This week I am meeting my cousin and going on a run with him, he will let me practice some when we are in a TS or lot! I am excited to try this method of backing up a trailer. Thanks Star!

EngineeringMother's Comment
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Thank you, Star. I'll be using this tomorrow on the range. Friday I had trouble backing in from a 45degree angle. Sometimes I got it, sometimes I didn't. I went over it in CDL Diaries, Swift Training. This should help.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
kayakngal's Comment
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I hope I'm not over thinking it Pebbles but, I sure do like learning any technique that'll help because this is where I'm least confident (backing) so, if I find this technique works for me then cool - way cool (Star if it works for me I'll be so excited). Driving forward I feel totally fine - with some stress in very tight situations but, I believe that will probably exist throughout my driving career. Backing is when I start praying and hope for some "lucky skill" to come into play. :)

Technology - I'm on top of my laptop being with me at all times and I have satellite WiFi so I hope I'm good there because I need this bad baby to pay my bills. And, once I'm solo I'll bring my old laptop for movies and such. For some reason Star I can't seem to read a book from my pc. I still like old school paper books although, as I mentioned in another post I'll take some online courses while on the road so at some point I'll have to read curriculum from a pc. That will be a learning experience too because I always took classes on campus. I'll wait until my training is complete before I sign up for any courses though.

Kathy you're so lucky to have someone to get practice with - take advantage of that as much as possible. You will feel so much more confident if you've practiced before you take your skills tests, especially backing up.

Starcar's Comment
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I want you all to go thru the High Road cdl training Brett has here on the site. It will get you way ahead of the rest of the people in your training group. and you will find taking your permit, hazmat , and endorsements alot easier.....So do yourself a favor, and buckle down and do it...

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Starcar's Comment
member avatar

One of the things that you need to remember is that you can "pull off" when the truck is idling, without giving it any "gas".you will find that backing up, or easing forward is sooo easy, just using the idle speed on the truck. And you won't jump or bounce, or kill the engine. In your car you can't do this, just in diesel rigs. But work on it, cuz it will give you alot of confidence, and you will do it by habit, and you won't get caught dumping the clutch.

Special K, aka Kathy's Comment
member avatar

I want you all to go thru the High Road cdl training Brett has here on the site. It will get you way ahead of the rest of the people in your training group. and you will find taking your permit, hazmat , and endorsements alot easier.....So do yourself a favor, and buckle down and do it...

I went through most of it before I took my permit test, and it was the most helpful program every. I didn't do any endorsements though. I hope that Central doesn't make me get all of them. I took General Knowledge, Air Brakes, and Combination. I am currently STRUGGLING through logbooks. I do not understand that at all, I feel like such and idiot. I haven't been back on it in a few day because I got frustrated with it. I will get back on it this week and try my best to comprehend it.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Logbook:

A written or electronic record of a driver's duty status which must be maintained at all times. The driver records the amount of time spent driving, on-duty not driving, in the sleeper berth, or off duty. The enforcement of the Hours Of Service Rules (HOS) are based upon the entries put in a driver's logbook.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

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