CDL Training At A Local College Truck Driving Academy

Topic 23685 | Page 2

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Brent R.'s Comment
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No weekend classes for me it’s monday thru Friday for 8 weeks they have evening classes that go for 16 weeks it’s like 530-1030pm

Brent R.'s Comment
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Today we did tandom sliding, connecting doubles and triples using the dolly, learned how to adjust brakes even though we’re not suppose to they wanted to show us Incase of an emergency, we then coupled and uncoupled a trailer, was good getting outside now we’re on the computers to work on modules to finish the day.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

G-Town's Comment
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Good for you Brandon. I have been following your progress as well as hundreds of others...true!

May not seem that important now, but sliding tandems is necessary to legally scale the load and attempt to balance your weight. Many new drivers overlook it and develop a lazy habit of leaving it as-is.

Since I run Walmart Dedicated it’s not unusual for me to “slide the screws” 3, up to 5 times per day depending on how many trailers I am under during a 12 hour shift and the amount of weight removed during my stops.

A little trick I learned many years ago to increase precision; use a half dollar and place it on the ground relative to the front edge of the cab step so that you can see it from the drivers seat. Place it the distance you need to slide, either fore or aft of the step. When you slide either forward or reverse, stop once the step edge is even with your mark; the half dollar. Virtually foolproof and eliminates the need for trial and error, and/or a spotter.

The other trick I use (learned it from a Walmart mechanic) is to set the trailer brakes with the Johnson bar or trailer brakes; it holds and locks better than the spring brakes set using the emergency brake (red knob). Knock-on-wood, in over 5 years I have never been unsuccessful freeing a “sticky” tandem frame set.

Tuck this away for future reference.

Good luck.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Brent R.'s Comment
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Good Information to have for sure thanks, all the instructors here say we will learn the meat of stuff when we get jobs and learn hands on in real world experiences with our trainers,

G-Town's Comment
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Good Information to have for sure thanks, all the instructors here say we will learn the meat of stuff when we get jobs and learn hands on in real world experiences with our trainers,

For the most part I agree, but the two pieces/tricks I shared with you were learned well after training.

Not trying to be argumentative, just setting expectations; I have regularly conducted classes on setting the tandems. Invariably there is always 1 or 2 new drivers that completed road training, that will claim its all new to them. Nothing surprises me anymore...

All I can say; make a mental note about this to discuss with your trainer. Be your own advocate.

Good luck.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Brent R.'s Comment
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Already did ask and he said he used a small orand traffic cone to do the same thing that’s good stuff to know and learn for sure, told him about the coin he said he did use that when he was younger but used the cone in older age lol

G-Town's Comment
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Already did ask and he said he used a small orand traffic cone to do the same thing that’s good stuff to know and learn for sure, told him about the coin he said he did use that when he was younger but used the cone in older age lol

I also use spare fluorescent orange load seals.

Brent R.'s Comment
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Meant Orange, seems like you never stop learning little tricks of the trade, I constantly ask questions for these guys they are a wealth of knowledge for sure.

G-Town's Comment
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Meant Orange, seems like you never stop learning little tricks of the trade, I constantly ask questions for these guys they are a wealth of knowledge for sure.

Orange cone? Just my opinion, perhaps impractical unless sliding on a public road.

And sometimes I am only moving 1 foot. For me I’ll stick with the coin or the seal. To each his own I guess...

Brent R.'s Comment
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Today we spent all day in truck driving on campus working on changing gears up shifting and downshifting double clutching , never got higher than 5th gear, the campus is on an old Air Force base so it has good roads and intersections with hardly any traffic but our trucks so it’s a perfect place to practice.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Double Clutching:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

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