Past Mistakes, Should I Move Forward And Get My CDL A?

Topic 23972 | Page 3

Page 3 of 3 Previous Page Go To Page:
Ashley R.'s Comment
member avatar

I'm an old man, had it took me a really long time to come to grips with a new way of doing things. Ashley, you say you've made some mistakes , and have come to grips with that. I will take that statement as face value, because I suspect you are from a generation which seriouly believes in a more conciliatory and gentle method of discussion.

Many of us here are older school than that, where bluntness is seen as a positive character trait. That said, I don't think anyone on here reach the level of vitriol that you will hear on the CB at any given time.

A felony fleeing and eluding police is, in my opinion, as bad as a DUI on your record. When you combine that with the stolen motor vehicle components, I don't know that many companies will consider taking a chance on your employment, for a very long time.

The advice given here, to look at schools that are paid for by the trucking companies, is sound. You can speak directly to a recruiter, and get a definitive answer on your acceptability to that particular company.

>Good luck to you, they are mistakes, and learning from them and moving forward is important. You may be qualified for hire by a company, but certainly don't spend your personal funds taking a chance, $3,500 is a lot of money

Peace.

Thank you I too have come to that conclusion even tho I really wanted that Technical Diploma. lol Thank you for your response!

DUI:

Driving Under the Influence

Aubrey M.'s Comment
member avatar

"Time does not heal all" when it comes to the job market. Despite what "you heard" from the recruiter, you need to listen to Rainey and own your mistakes. Doing so means not only being honest about your record and your obvious temper, but making strides (of your own volition) to improve yourself. Since you now have a cushy job, you should seek the type of classes you were ordered to go to for probation and complete them yourself. Additionally, attendance of another group or some sort or mental therapy would be a benefit when you finally do go talk to recruiters. Otherwise, what will you have to offer?

Just like all other jobs nowadays, you will be competing against people with far better qualifications than you. It is pretty easy to decide whether to hire someone with no felony, no reckless driving, and no documented anger issues vs a person who has all of those on their record. So you have to have something else to bring to the table aside from "well, I haven't done those things for 3-5 years," because this could just mean you haven't been caught doing those things for 3-5 years.

As has been pointed out, no one is going to knowingly take a chance on you when there are numerous other candidates who don't have your history. Just look at the newbies on here for instance, there are two or three veterans who are getting into trucking, one who served as an officer for years, and folks with no criminal record at all. And this is just three examples out of 1000's. My guess is the only companies who would consider you are ones you certainly would not want to work for,who would probably hold your history over your head to keep you in line and make you do what they want you to do.

I don't care what generation you're from, facts are facts. And as Brett and G-Town pointed out, there is no room for hand holding or trying to down-play your past when it comes to putting other people's lives in your hands.

It was "your" decision to leave and let your boyfriend tell the cops his side.

It was "your" decision to steal a car and run from the cops.

It was "your" decision to violate a court order and see your boyfriend again.

It was "your" decision not to pay for the classes the Court ordered you to take.

It was "your" decision to drive over 20mph over the speed limit.

And it must be "your" decision to accept your past bad decisions and be proactive in making decisions to counter those.

You will be a lot more successful and happier in life by being honest with yourself, even if it does not result in you becoming a trucker. Additionally, it may give you the wisdom to see and help others who are in the position you are currently in, or maybe even prevent them from making the same mistakes.

I'm sorry if it seems I'm ganging up on you with everyone else, but you can't see the truth. All you have to do is read through past posts from the people who have offered you advice here and you will see they have no ill intent toward anyone. There is a reason for the old saying "the truth hurts." It's because most of us cannot accept the truth about ourselves and actually go on to use that to try and better ourselves despite the hurt. Your career change needs to start with a life change. Good luck to you and God bless you.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Ashley R.'s Comment
member avatar

"Time does not heal all" when it comes to the job market. Despite what "you heard" from the recruiter, you need to listen to Rainey and own your mistakes. Doing so means not only being honest about your record and your obvious temper, but making strides (of your own volition) to improve yourself. Since you now have a cushy job, you should seek the type of classes you were ordered to go to for probation and complete them yourself. Additionally, attendance of another group or some sort or mental therapy would be a benefit when you finally do go talk to recruiters. Otherwise, what will you have to offer?

Just like all other jobs nowadays, you will be competing against people with far better qualifications than you. It is pretty easy to decide whether to hire someone with no felony, no reckless driving, and no documented anger issues vs a person who has all of those on their record. So you have to have something else to bring to the table aside from "well, I haven't done those things for 3-5 years," because this could just mean you haven't been caught doing those things for 3-5 years.

As has been pointed out, no one is going to knowingly take a chance on you when there are numerous other candidates who don't have your history. Just look at the newbies on here for instance, there are two or three veterans who are getting into trucking, one who served as an officer for years, and folks with no criminal record at all. And this is just three examples out of 1000's. My guess is the only companies who would consider you are ones you certainly would not want to work for,who would probably hold your history over your head to keep you in line and make you do what they want you to do.

I don't care what generation you're from, facts are facts. And as Brett and G-Town pointed out, there is no room for hand holding or trying to down-play your past when it comes to putting other people's lives in your hands.

It was "your" decision to leave and let your boyfriend tell the cops his side.

It was "your" decision to steal a car and run from the cops.

It was "your" decision to violate a court order and see your boyfriend again.

It was "your" decision not to pay for the classes the Court ordered you to take.

It was "your" decision to drive over 20mph over the speed limit.

And it must be "your" decision to accept your past bad decisions and be proactive in making decisions to counter those.

You will be a lot more successful and happier in life by being honest with yourself, even if it does not result in you becoming a trucker. Additionally, it may give you the wisdom to see and help others who are in the position you are currently in, or maybe even prevent them from making the same mistakes.

I'm sorry if it seems I'm ganging up on you with everyone else, but you can't see the truth. All you have to do is read through past posts from the people who have offered you advice here and you will see they have no ill intent toward anyone. There is a reason for the old saying "the truth hurts." It's because most of us cannot accept the truth about ourselves and actually go on to use that to try and better ourselves despite the hurt. Your career change needs to start with a life change. Good luck to you and God bless you.

Thank you for your input. I did Complete the classes 4 years ago. like I said in two replies back I am holding off 5 years after reviewing everyone's advice. I still think about Truck driving every day and know I want to do it but also know I must hold off for now. I am taking this time to prove to myself I have changed . When the time is close I will be attending a technical college (FVTC) for my schooling and will not go through a fast track Paid CDL.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Aubrey M.'s Comment
member avatar

class="blockquoteImageAfter">

Thank you for your input. I did Complete the classes 4 years ago. like I said in two replies back I am holding off 5 years after reviewing everyone's advice. I still think about Truck driving every day and know I want to do it but also know I must hold off for now. I am taking this time to prove to myself I have changed . When the time is close I will be attending a technical college (FVTC) for my schooling and will not go through a fast track Paid CDL.

Gotcha, I missed or didn't remember the post about the classes. Regardless, seems like you stepped back from the reflex response to posts and you are willing to do what you need to do. I'm glad to hear it as I'm sure others are on here.

If you still have the desire to become a trucker down the road in a couple of years then I'd urge you to take the advice of the veterans on here with regard to a paid CDL. You're entering into a different employer/employee work dynamic than you and most people are used to nowadays. Basically, you're used to CYA because the company you work for can replace you in a short time with minimal or no cost to themselves...leaving you in limbo to pay bills and survive. If you are hired by a company who also invested a lot of money in you for training, then they are not so quick to give you the boot for minor screw-ups or being slow to catch on. A company who trains you helps give you more bargaining power for your job (within reason). Similarly, if you know you're on the hook for a crapload of money should you leave or screw up, then you will probably focus better and stay intent on performing well in your job.

I've read numerous examples of people who have screwed up in their first year driving for a company they trained with and they were sent back for more training typically (given another chance). I have not seen any such posts by folks who hired into a company as a graduate or experienced driver. I'm sure there are examples of these instances, but I imagine the bar is a little different between the two. Basically, if you train with a company, then you both have something to gain by sticking with each other, and you both have something to lose by parting ways. If you just attend a school and have no experience, then it is the company taking on all of the risk.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Page 3 of 3 Previous Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More