Community College Cdl Training Or Company Paid Training

Topic 24716 | Page 1

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Katina H.'s Comment
member avatar

Hello ladies! Thinking outside of the box for career change. I have been an emergency room nurse for 13 years and the location I was working at just shut down. I saw this coming and was already looking into getting my cdl. I live in west Texas where the oil industry is booming so naturally that’s all the companies you see are hiring for, CDL Drivers. There is a community college here who offers a 4 week course for cdl, my question is, is it better to go that route or find company paid training? I’m not sure how recruitment looks fresh out of community college or if it’s better to sign on with company that pays for training and job placement. Any advice on either and if anyone has any suggestions for best company paid training for female driver in Texas! Looking to get my permit soon! Thanks in advance!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

Welcome to TT. We really recommend company sponsored schools. I went the community college route myself (and part time classes) and I sure wouldn't recommend it.

If you go to a company sponsored school, you are going to cover more, because they are teaching you to work for them . You're pretty much guaranteed a job.. whereas a private school, is going to barely teach you enough to pass your skills test and get your CDL. For instance, many states don't require alley docking for the skills test. In driving, that's the most common type of backing you'll be doing! I've had trainees who attended a private school and their ONLY road training was on the TEST COURSE! It was like starting them off from day one with a permit, because quite frankly, they couldn't drive safely. They'd simply memorized the test course.

When you attend a company sponsored school, that company has a vested financial interest in your success as as safe reliable driver and will generally be a bit more forgiving on minor errors. When you go the private route.. they have your money.. did you pass and get your CDL? Maybe, maybe not, but they're done with you after a certain point. You're on your own to find a company to drive for. They may offer tuition reimbursement, but they might not.

Why pay out money that you simply don't need to for a career that has an astronomical percentage of failures, when you can attend company sponsored schools for little to nothing out of pocket? Yeah, you'll sign a contract agreeing to work for them a certain amount of time, so they can recoup their investment in you. No biggie since job hopping looks really bad and you'll want to stay with your first company a minimum of a year anyway.

I hope that helps explain some of it.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

Hello... i went the company sponsored route and my only regret is not doing it years prior. My main argument against private school is that CDL schools only background and medical check you for bare minimum DOT requirements. That means once you go to a company you can be rejected for poor work history, a medication or medical condition, or criminal and driving record because each company has different standards.

Just because a school accepts you does not.mean a company will. It is much bettee to find out by the company you cant get hired before you waste your time and money.

Check out this article written by Trucking Truth's owner

Why I Prefer Company Sponsored Training Over Local CDL Schools

Understand however that most companies are going to want OTR experience before getting a local job of that is your intent. Going local right away is very difficult due to.lack of skills.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Deb R.'s Comment
member avatar

I did a 10 week course at a Technical College, and it was excellent. I preferred being able to apply at different companies once I had the CDL; not being locked into one company gave me more options. I also found a company that had tuition reimbursement.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

I did a 10 week course at a Technical College, and it was excellent. I preferred being able to apply at different companies once I had the CDL; not being locked into one company gave me more options. I also found a company that had tuition reimbursement.

i understand that, but honestly, any company you go to you should stay a full year. Bouncing companies wont impress other companies.

Big Scott just posted a job ad that said "no more tha two companies in 3 years". i know people who have 3 in six months!

and keep in mind, school prices and reimbursement vary.

In NJ CDL school can be $7000. And some companies will only give you $1500 of that. And you dont get it right away they divy it out over 1 to 2 years..so that locks you into the company anyway.

also, you can apply to various companies before the CDL. Not all companies will take a new CDL holder for insurance reasons. Not all companies train new drivers...and school is the easy part. there is still extensive training to br a trucker

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Sylvia F.'s Comment
member avatar

I went to a Community College, full time. I enjoyed it and I would recommend it! I chose the company I wanted to work for, I received a hiring bonus. Whenever you’re changing job fields your state will usually give you Vocational Rehabilitation and pay for everything! Company paid trainings can stink due to fact you get stuck at the company for a year.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

I went to a Community College, full time. I enjoyed it and I would recommend it! I chose the company I wanted to work for, I received a hiring bonus. Whenever you’re changing job fields your state will usually give you Vocational Rehabilitation and pay for everything! Company paid trainings can stink due to fact you get stuck at the company for a year.

Welcome to the forum, but please explain to me how paid training can suck?

EVERYONE should stay a full year at their first company, and despite popular belief, not all companies hire new CDL holders. So that means you pretty much choose from the same companies with schools. There are a few exceptions.

Even with a hiring bonus and tuition reumbursement, you need to work for that company for a determine amount of time, usually 6 months to a year. The longest I saw was 2 years.

At my company, you are at a disadvantage coming in with your CDL. You get paid $100 less per week and need to run 10,000 more miles in an already exhausting training system. My FM told my CDL holder trainee, "You learned your schools way now you need to unlearn that and learn Primes way".

And having a CDL is just a starting point. Congrats but you have so much more to learn. Many think that plastic gets them in, it doesnt. They even think that job offer is complete..it isnt. The entire orientation and training period is an interview. The companines can put greater physical requirements on thr DOT physical than you need for a school. So jist becsuse you got a CDL and got an invitation for a company, it dors not mean you will.pass their DOT physical, or even their background checks. Companies dig WAY deeper than schools.

Vocational Rehab in my state is only for people who are disabled or can no longer physically or mentally perform their jobs. It does not cover everyone. Is this true in your state?

In which state are you and what company are you going with?

good luck and congrats!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Ms L.'s Comment
member avatar

Good information here. I'm ready to try again for my CDL , just looking for companies. I appreciate your points about the differences and experienced some of that my first time.

I'm sure much has changed since 2015 , so I'm here at TT looking for new opportunities.

Suggestions are welcome.

V

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Ruth S.'s Comment
member avatar

I went to a trade school. They work with a local company who trained me. 7 week program, 5 days a week, through the unemployment (Career Center) They totally paid all of my costs, and gave me gas money to go back and forth to school. I even got to use the lottery grant! Yesterday I got my Class A CDL License and tomorrow I am going for orientation with the company that works with the trade school! I was guaranteed to be employed, and will get my experience training with a trainer for 6 to 8 weeks, with a salary! Best thing I ever did was go through the unemployment office! I'm also contract free, and don't have to stay with the company that trained me, And I am not in debt! Good Luck!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
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