Did You Finish Your CRST Contract

Topic 25251 | Page 2

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Doug C.'s Comment
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Cwc, are you saying indirectly that CRST is not a good company?

Cwc's Comment
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No, he asked if anyone finished the contract and what they did, move on or stay. Someone else chimed in and mentioned codrivers quit on them. I made the most of my time, I also had a pretty good picture of what to expect.

My DM was awesome. Right at the end of my contract he was promoted and I was placed with someone else. My codriver was due for home time which put me in Carlisle,PA and my wife called with a family "emergency" kinda... I was needed at the house for a couple weeks and couldn't say no. So living in VA... I gave my notice...

I was supposed to wait for my codrivers time off. He had no intention of returning.

Most of the loads were pretty easy places to get in and out of... Looking back. Lots of Amazon, Fed Ex, UPS. Some Jersey runs, Chicago, CA.

A lot of coast to coast runs when I had a codriver.

I learned pretty quick that team driving wasn't for me. I still had some fun, had some bad times also.

If your going that route make sure towards the end of your time (if you find that teaming isn't for you) to learn to use your hours as a solo driver... Running your hours out and stopping at the nearest rest area so the other person can take over... Not the same. Took me a minute to catch on. Also I can't remember if CRST lets you use the split sleeper berth option so..

Short answer for you DougC, They were pretty low on the pay scale at the time. *Think they bumped the pay* but not sure. Teaming is either something you love or hate. That has nothing to do with the company. The company did right by me. Show up ready to work. Hopefully your codriver does the same so choose wisely.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Splitter's Comment
member avatar

No, he asked if anyone finished the contract and what they did, move on or stay. Someone else chimed in and mentioned codrivers quit on them. I made the most of my time, I also had a pretty good picture of what to expect.

My DM was awesome. Right at the end of my contract he was promoted and I was placed with someone else. My codriver was due for home time which put me in Carlisle,PA and my wife called with a family "emergency" kinda... I was needed at the house for a couple weeks and couldn't say no. So living in VA... I gave my notice...

I was supposed to wait for my codrivers time off. He had no intention of returning.

Most of the loads were pretty easy places to get in and out of... Looking back. Lots of Amazon, Fed Ex, UPS. Some Jersey runs, Chicago, CA.

A lot of coast to coast runs when I had a codriver.

I learned pretty quick that team driving wasn't for me. I still had some fun, had some bad times also.

If your going that route make sure towards the end of your time (if you find that teaming isn't for you) to learn to use your hours as a solo driver... Running your hours out and stopping at the nearest rest area so the other person can take over... Not the same. Took me a minute to catch on. Also I can't remember if CRST lets you use the split sleeper berth option so..

Short answer for you DougC, They were pretty low on the pay scale at the time. *Think they bumped the pay* but not sure. Teaming is either something you love or hate. That has nothing to do with the company. The company did right by me. Show up ready to work. Hopefully your codriver does the same so choose wisely.

Very insightful & honest response. I knew from reading the diaries that teaming all the time was definitely a deal breaker for me. For a few months while training is one thing but all the time, all year round? Ummm yeah... I'll pass.

I remember reading Simon from Steven's Transport posts & the issue he faced. He handled them like a champ. Me? I'd have quit.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Doug C.'s Comment
member avatar

Thank you Cwc. Appreciate the openness.

Cwc's Comment
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What else I learned is that I like them big looong runs from coast to coast. A few weeks ago was the first time I had been to CA in years. Or Kingman AZ.

I liked running out in the south west but I just don't get out that way often.

Cwc's Comment
member avatar

Also... When they tell you the home time policy, take it with a grain of salt. Often I would stay out for awhile at a time. It's easier on them if you do it that way depending on where you live. So when I got home after a few days I would get a phone call asking if I was enjoying my home time. Then at the end of it he would tell me "just give me a call whenever you feel like heading out"

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