Want To Learn Trucking But Have Some Questions.

Topic 29193 | Page 1

Page 1 of 1
Lauren D.'s Comment
member avatar

I've always liked travel, being by myself and driving. I've had a rough three years, but I've decided to look into becoming a trucker. I'm a 30 year old woman and I have a lot of fears about traveling by myself. I live with my parents but want to help them live better. I don't have a family of my own. So, I'd like to ask y'all in this forum some questions about being on the road and a few other things I've wondered.

I live in Texas. There's many different cdl's from what I've seen. Whats the best one for a new driver? Whats the best way to earn the license? Through a company or taking a loan for college or grant?

I drive a standard corrola with 6 gears. How is a big rig different? Or will my experience with driving standard help me learn?

I'd like to know how safe it is for a woman to drive a big rig. What are some things you wished you knew to prepare for starting? What are some of the dangers?

How difficult is it to find where you need to be? I can find my way around but I rely on GPS for first time visits anywhere.

How stressful is the job? I prefer being by myself and do a better job working alone than with partners. Are you put on tight schedules?

And, I would like to know how the pay is. You don't have to give exact numbers but I know absolutely nothing about how trucking companies pay their employees. Is it by haul, mileage, etc?

I know its a lot of questions. I found a lot of technical information browsing the web but then I ended up here. I really peoples personal opinions. This is a really big thing for me and its a little daunting thinking about driving such big equipment but I can't shake the feeling that its what I really want to do. I would just like to learn a few things first.

Thank you for reading

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

I am kinda busy right now but will respond i. The morning. Try looking here:

Paid CDL Training Programs

These are some articles I wrote that may answer some of your questions.

Kearseys Articles

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Sophia P.'s Comment
member avatar

Hi Lauren,

You've asked a lot of questions but I'll do my best to answer as many as I can. I guess getting your CDL depends on your situation money and time wise. You can definitely pay for a school and have more flexibility about your 1st trucking job that way but those programs generally cost a lot. There are companies out there who will train you for your CDL but afterwards you generally owe them a year and leaving before that time sometimes winds up getting charged for the cost of training, which would out you back in scenario one anyway!

Today driving a truck is very safe compared to decades ago. The "dangers" are few physically. I've never felt like I was in danger of being raped or assaulted on the road but I also walk through parking lots looking confident and with purpose. There are the occasional times when a guy will start being a bit overly friendly and starts asking questions like "are you alone out here" and such. Once I detect he's probably after companionship, which I'm not, I respond " I've got to get back to our truck, my husband's sleeping" and he usually fades away! Walk confidently like you own the place and you'll be fine! Most all major brands of modern truck stops today are equipped with several cameras for security reasons.

Knowing where you are going is a matter of experience. You'll know in a year if trucking is right for you.

Stress is a part of every new driver's experience, even the guys! The schedule you get depends on what type of commodity you wind up hauling. Food haulers and cattle hauling are often on tighter schedules because their cargo is time sensitive whereas dry van freight like a bunch of towels can take longer and less time critical. Tankers are sometimes in the same category. Some tanker freight is food grade, temperature controlled or something that changes in consistency over time like asphalt or concrete. There are literally thousands of commodity types out there. Some loads take hours and some take weeks or longer! I've hauled loads that delivered the same day and I've taken loads that delivered 10 days later!

The pay isn't great as a new driver but after your first year you can expect to see your earnings increase IF you wind up being an asset to your company not a liability. If you're a driver who plans, loads, drives and arrives on time, or early, you can expect to be rewarded by CONSISTENTLY doing that over and over. If you're a driver who cares about nothing but complaining, tears up trucks and makes excuses for constantly being late you won't do well in this industry, so a lot depends on you!

I applaud you for doing your research first. Should you decide to embark on this journey one thing is for sure: You'll probably never be out of work again so there is security and peace knowing that!

take care,

Sophia Owner Operator

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Owner Operator:

An owner-operator is a driver who either owns or leases the truck they are driving. A self-employed driver.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Page 1 of 1

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More