Getting Hired After School ?

Topic 29258 | Page 1

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Brian M.'s Comment
member avatar

I ve been researching getting into this for some time. since the world is changing. I ve been in the restaurant business for most of my life, at 60 I still feel young enough to be productive and having been an owner , I have the ambition and work ethic to understand ( nor do I have and allusions that this is a tough racket and you have to perform) what a company needs to have from drivers to be successful. I found this site about a month ago and really enjoy reading the blogs and advice from the moderators and contributors and appreciate the "truth" about what it is about out there. I have used High Road Training and studied for awhile as well as cruised the internet and talked to local guys I know that work at this. I ve taken and passed my CDL permit test ( thanks to this sight ) have a CLP with passenger and school bus endorsements and it sounds like there is a ton of work out there ...if you re willing to work. I got hired with a School Bus Transportation Co and have gone thru there training for a few weeks and they are pretty impressed and have me scheduled for my road test for next Thursday, (I am not a bragger) I never thought I would make it this quick, but once I got up in that big 42 ft bus and weaseled around some tight steering maneuvers in inner city streets and understood control and air brakes and mirror usage and backing successfully. I was blown away at my own abilities , besides the bug hit me that I just love the feeling of being in control of a "rig" like that. Now don't get me wrong I'm not saying swinging a school bus around with all that takes is the same as a 80k pound rig with a trailer in all conditions by any means. but it makes you understand the responsibility and need for safety and skill it takes to respect the road and realize the poor habits of 4 wheelers underfoot! Anyway, at the same time I had been applying to them I looked into and signed up for driving school with Sage in my area of Upstate NY., I want to get my CDL-A and really pursue this. Notwithstanding that schools have been shut down again for who knows how long due to the "VIRUS" so there is hardly any work. I know the general consensus on here is "get with a company , stay committed, and don't waste your money... but my thought is Im Really a rookie to this work and would not want to try and get hired ,,, into a training program without having a basic knowledge of brakes and gauges and backing and pre tripping and the like and I realize that after that course Id still be pretty green. The area does seem to have some opportunities for CDL-A work with limited experience and I am not in the position to head out on the open road just yet, although thats in the future ...I have the time and the loot to do the schooling and testing now. My question becomes.. I have worked for myself for the last few years and have flown under the radar with limited documentation of income... will that become a stumbling block trying to get hired with trucking co s due to regulations or their policies? I hold liquor licenses and permits and such but some blogs have guys that were taking care of family saying they ve been turned down..due to lack of w-2s.. Id hate to spend a bunch of cash and find out i don't fit the need... whats gonna happen when or if Immigration opens up and the industry has a flood of those applicants?? Any insight is greatly appreciated..

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

CLP:

Commercial Learner's Permit

Before getting their CDL, commercial drivers will receive their commercial learner's permit (CLP) upon passing the written portion of the CDL exam. They will not have to retake the written exam to get their CDL.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Have you been filing tax returns? You can prove what you've been doing with those records.

Don't worry about "what if" scenarios like floods of immigrants. There's plenty of trucking jobs available to you. Nobody can just cross the border and instantly become a U.S. truck driver. We have immigration in here all the time begging for help to drive here. There's no easy pathway for them.

You sound like a guy who is always talking himself out of taking action. The best cure for that is to jump in. Throw out your fears and apply for Paid CDL Training Programs. They will make sure you are trained properly and then they will put you in a truck. You'll still have a lot to learn but you can do it like thousands before you. It's not rocket science. It takes a lot of commitment. That seems to be what you're a little short on.

Hang around here and participate in our forum discussions. You'll learn a lot and you'll probably gain some confidence. There's no reason you can't make this happen. You've just got to get that truth firmed up in your mind.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Brian M.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks Old School. I always enjoy your responses to folks on here. and your sense of encouragement and reality is a blessing to all. I defiantly have the confidence that I can do this or whatever I put my mind to, My work career in the restaurant business over the years has taught me a work ethic I m proud of and I ve been accused of reinventing myself several times thru my life. I always tell my kids and those i ve mentored..." do something you love and you 'll never WORK a day in your life" I see things from both sides and know you only get back what you put in. I remember a post from Brett that spoke to if all truck professionals , acted and carried themselves as Professionals the public would have a higher respect for them. Thats how I plan to go thru. Im not worried about competition for work from immigration or anyone else I do believe if you perform , you ll rise to the top you only compete with yourself. I just mention that because I m a couple years back on the tax thing and dont want it to stone me or kill my program... Thanks for your insight.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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