Roehl Driver Training From Start To End.....

Topic 2938 | Page 15

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Wine Taster's Comment
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The CB was a cobra 29. It is really nice. It was $109 peaked and tuned. I saw the same CB at Pilot the other day for $69.99 but $20 was a mail in rebate. It was not peaked or tuned. I paid an additional $40 for the antenna, mount and coax cable. It total about $150.

Weatherman's Comment
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Not bad. Thanks!!!

Wine Taster's Comment
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Sorry I have not posted much. I am getting pretty settled in. Yesterday I got my first taste of tarping in 90 degree plus and 100% humidity. No covered area. Right out in the hot sun. I had to take a couple of breaks in the truck AC to cool off. I got it and done. Then I drove for a couple of hours until I had to stop. I was in the middle of nowhere. The placed I loaded at, I had no cell phone service. By the time I pulled out, I had two hours on my clock. It took an hour to get back to the real world. I started looking for somewhere to stop. There was nothing close. I was getting worried but then out of the blue, a small town with a Walmart. I rolled in the lot and shut down with 12 minutes to spare. One of these days, my luck of finding somewhere to park last minute is going to run out. Today, I pushed my clock again. When, I pulled into this TA I had 14 minutes on my 11 hour clock. Today was nothing but driving. I will get up around 0330 in the morning and roll out at 0400. The delivery will unload starting at 0700 and I plan to be sitting at the gate when they open.

Wine Taster's Comment
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Not much to report today. I made my delivery. Then when I went to pick up the next one, I found under secured. Then, it was hanging 6 fett off the trailer. Called safety and sure enough it requires permits because it is oversized. So, I unhooked and came across the street and waited for a load until my 14 hour clock ran out. It has been a long day.

Wine Taster's Comment
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Today has been one for the learning books. I had asked to have hometime starting today. Things just have not worked out I guess. Anyway, I told them today because I wanted to be home for something Saturday. That way if they got me home late, I could still make it. This morning I was still waiting to hear what was going to happen. Then I called in and asked. I was told that they had 30 other drivers that did not have loads either. So, I politely explained I had to be home by Saturday morning or I would be really unhappy. They had plenty of notice. So a bit later I get a call asking if I would mind hauling a van. NOPE! As long as it got me moving, I would drag a sled down the road. I was told to pick up a trailer that has been sold and take it to the Appleton terminal. Also, I had to unload all my tarps because of weight. Got all that done and headed out. Got to Appleton and dropped that trailer and picked up an empty one to take to the customer. I got there and was told to slide the tandems all the way back and drop it on row 4. Never slid a tandem before so that was new. Then trying to back the stupid thing without a spread axle was comic relief for everybody watching. 35 minutes later I was back to the area where I pulled in. The yard guy had brought my loaded trailer over and I got hooked. Then, I send the message saying I was loaded and I keep getting an error message back. Turns out I was putting the information in correct. Whoever dropped the trailer did not enter in the computer that they dropped it so the computer thought it was still with them and gave me errors for trying to pick it up. It all got sorted out. Sadly, it was around 1500 when I got out of there so I hit Detroit and Chicago rush hour traffic. I made it almost to Indianapolis and shut down at a rest stop. My delivery is tomorrow night at 2359. It is a drop and I have to pick up another van empty. When I get back from hometime, I have to haul a van until they get me back to a flatbed. The experience of hauling different trailers is a good thing I think.

I was in Marshfield and I think I saw Tracee. Wish I had some time to go over and say hi. But I had to roll. Maybe next time Tracee!

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Wine Taster's Comment
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Well ladies and gents, I am at home for some much needed rest. It has been fun posting but I think the regular updates will have to end. Not sure if anything I have been typing was much help for anybody. Pick up a load here and go there blah blah blah. I look forward to seeing you all around the forum. If you have any questions for me, please just ask away.

Weatherman's Comment
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Thank you for your updates for they have been a great help. I already have a pre-hire with Roehl and hope to sign on with them once I complete my CDL course. Enjoy your home time sir, it is well earned. good-luck.gif

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Pre-hire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Wine Taster's Comment
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That is awesome. Once you get rolling let me know. If our paths cross we can grab a coffee or something. Are yo going to a private school?

Weatherman's Comment
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That is awesome. Once you get rolling let me know. If our paths cross we can grab a coffee or something. Are yo going to a private school?

Yes I am in a private school here in SC. Hopefully I well have my CDL in a couple more weeks. After that, I am looking to get in the Dry van division and my recruiter says my orientation will be in Georgia. I will happily shoot you a message once I am up and rolling.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Tarren W.'s Comment
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Thanks so much, WT!!! I have really enjoyed your thread from start to finish, and you have helped me more than you know! For one, before I read it, I was set in the notion that I was going to go to a private CDL school, and I had all but picked the company I wanted to drive for. Now, I have re-evaluated my thinking, and I am going to apply to Roehl's CDL school and hopefully drive for them. I haven't taken this decision lightly, either. I've gone through all of the training companies on the TT list, and Roehl really stood out to me for having what I am looking for as far as hometime, etc... I hope you will keep us up to date on how things go from time to time!

Keep the rubber side down!

Tarren

P.S. I sent you a PM a while back. I figured you were busy so, if you get a chance to PM me back, that would be great!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
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