Roehl Driver Training From Start To End.....

Topic 2938 | Page 6

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Jim M.'s Comment
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WT,

I am still going through with the required class on the 2nd, that is free, I'll fill out the app and ask some questions while there. It certainly can't hurt to attempt to get it while in school or shortly thereafter. It is possible that the woman at the counter wasn't completely honest about how it works.

I already paid upfront for the additional training. I felt it was better to get it all and I was willing to pay to get it. But I understand where you are coming from with your advice.

Thanks again have a good week.

Wine Taster's Comment
member avatar

Very cool, WT!

I head to Ellenwood today to start Phase 1. Roehl doesn't have any flatbed ops here in FL, but, I'm sticking with them.

You will do great! It is very fast paced. Just listen to your instructors and you will be fine. Don't forget to enjoy it. This is the start of your career. Have fun and laugh at your mistakes. Learn from them. Good luck! Please, keep me updated. I would love to know how it is going for you.

Wine Taster's Comment
member avatar

Jim,

If money is a issue, why not go to a company sponsored program? Just curious?

Wine Taster's Comment
member avatar

Day 20 of training: (Sunday)

Today, we wake up to snow. Yes, it is snowing again. The wind is blowing. Figures. Today is the day, we are supposed to be outside securing and tarping loads. We had to be in class by 0700. Bill, Mike and I got there at 0645 as usual. Class started a little bit late. We sat through some more powerpoints. I guess it was around 1030 when we headed outside. Did I mention I am from the south? Well, I was prepared. I had long johns on. Flannel lined jeans. Two pair of socks. Long sleeve shirt. Flannel shirt on top. Carhart bibs. Carhart jacket. Carhart fleece headgear with built in facemask covers nose and mouth. Insulated work boots. Gloves. Yeap, I looked like the Mechelin Man.

Luckily, the wind had died down and the sun was shining. They had 5 different type loads on each set up. They had coils, wire bundles (slinkies), pipe, concrete blocks, and and another one with coils. The coils were loaded different on the two trucks. We covered the safety rules. Then they showed us how to fold tarps. We were just standing around and I was not at all cold. Lunch.

After lunch, we headed back to the trucks. They broke us up into groups of three. There were about 20 of us in the class. Each group was assigned a truck. We were told to unsecure the load and place all items on the deck on the front of the trailer. They had to be properly rolled, folded or stored. Next, we were told to secure the load to meet minimum DOT standards. The very first question I asked was how much do these blocks weigh. The instructor said each block was 4000 pounds on our truck. Mike, Bill and I had a discussion about the front block. I stated it should have two straps because it was unblocked and you had to have two straps within the first 10 feet for unblocked cargo. Bill and Mike said that it was under 5000 pounds so that one strap worked. I kind of pushed the issue and was not positive I was correct. They finally agreed to put two straps on it but said if I was wrong they would razz the &^%$# out of me. Turns out I was right. The block was over 1,100 pounds so it must have 2 chains on it. We put one chain on each set behind that block. We made one crucial mistake. The instructor said we did very well and did meet DOT minimum requirements. EXCEPT, one minor (MAJOR) detail. Two, of the chains were not marked. DOH! It was a very good lesson in checking your equipment. We assumed the chains were marked. Two were not which meant that one of the blocks would have been illegally secured to DOT standard. The other one did not matter because it was on the front block and had a second marked chain that had a WLL that was high enough by itself. There are so many details you have to pay close attention too with this securement stuff.

After we tarped the load, we were told to remove all the securements and rotate to the next truck. Well, at this point, I realized I am over dressed. I ended up stripping my Carhart coat and bibs because I was sweating. 22 degrees and I am sweating! It is hard work. Anyway, the second truck, we are told to use "best practice" to secure the load. That means you may use more than what DOT requires or not depending on the load. We had pipe. On the front it was PVC pipe and the back metal pipe. We did pretty good at securing it right. The instructor said we did meet DOT requirements. We should have listened to Bill and belly wrapped the pipe. The instructor said that the belly wrap would have been best practice. Then, we rotated again. We did well on most of it. Around 1730, the day was over.

We were given our meal vouchers. We were told we had done a good job in the class. They wished us well and sent us on our way. Bill only lives one and a half hours away so he checked out and went home. We all said our goodbyes after dinner. We had already traded phone numbers so we could all stay in touch. Mike went to see some family that was a couple of hours away. I headed out to South Bend, IN to see some family. We could have all stayed in the hotel Sunday night but I think we were all ready to get home.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Wine Taster's Comment
member avatar

Well, I have finished Phase 1 of training. Phase 2 will start soon. This morning I got up at my families house. We had breakfast. I hit the road around 1000. With a 14 hour drive ahead, I was in no hurry. My family was not expecting me home until Tuesday anyway. I guess it was around 1100 that I get a call from my fleet manager. She asked if I had made it home O.K. I started laughing. Ummmm. I will get there about 0200 early Tuesday morning. She talked with me about getting my license transferred. Then she said to call her so we could get me set up to go with my trainer at the end of the week. Wow! This is moving really fast. So, a little while later, I am driving and the phone rings. He asked if the FM had called me and I said she had. He said, "Did she ask you if you were home yet?" We both got a good laugh about it. He was driving a little further than me.

Anyway, I made it home safe. It is a really long drive bouncing around in an GMC Sonoma ( basically an S - 10). I really miss that air ride of the big trucks for sure. This morning, I surprised my little girls by waking them for school. They woke up and dove into my arms and gave me a big hug. I missed them a lot. After they headed for school, I crashed for a couple more hours. Then I got up and headed to DMV. Everything went fine. I now have my temporary CDL - A in NC with all my endorsements. Twins, tankers and hazmat. Word to the wise, don't get the passenger endorsement on your learner's permit. It is a waste of money. They will not add it on to your CDL unless you bring a bus and test in it. I don't really need the P endorsement so no bigger. If I ever need it, I can get it easily.

So, I call my FM on the way back from DMV. She was very happy to hear that I had got it transferred so quick. She was really happy that I have Passport, TWIC , and hazmat all completed. She said that is going to help me a lot and that I was ahead of the game. She asked when could I be ready to meet my Phase 2 trainer and hit the road. I said whenever she needed me to be. She said it could by as soon as Thursday. I said that was not a problem. She called later and said that it will probably be next week sometime before they get a trainer this way. Luckily, I get a little time off to spend with my family. Sh said to call her Friday just to make sure nothing had changed.

The next few days, I will be off. I just hope all the time off from driving does not make me lose the shifting skills that I have been refining. Shifting still needs some work but with time I will be O.K. I will update as much as I can through the Phase 2 training. Just hoping I get a good trainer.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Jim M.'s Comment
member avatar

Wow, it sure does move fast, I remember when you posted your first day of schooling.

Enjoy your well-deserved time off and the family, you've earned it.

And best of luck on Phase 2 and TNT! Slainte'

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14ยข per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

Wine Taster's Comment
member avatar

Thanks Jim!

I have nothing to report today. My CDL - A is done. Just waiting for the real copy to arrive in the mail. Waiting to hear when I will hit the road for phase 2. Getting ready to go out to breakfast with a friend from my old job. Enjoying the time off. Drank a beer last night and caught up on some T.V. shows I have missed. Amazingly relaxed!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Wine Taster's Comment
member avatar

Well, with nothing do to except fix a few things around the house, I started looking over all my employment stuff for Roehl. Turns out they have driver training courses online for employees. The have Roehl University online. So, to pass the time, I have started working my way through these courses. Hopefully, I can get through them all before gong out with my trainer. Maybe I can learn some more so I will be even more prepared as I hit the roads alone in the future. So exciting!

Anyway, got to run for now. Got to get to Lowe's for some plumbing parts and a door knob.

Wine Taster's Comment
member avatar

Yesterday, I got a call from my FM. She asked if I could be in Leesburg, VA on Monday morning? That is almost 6 hours away from me. I said I would see what I could do. I asked if I could drive my car and park it there. She said that I could not because after I finish my phase 2 training that they would drop me at a terminal to get my truck. I said OK I will make it happen. Now, I sit here looking at buses, trains and planes. I am waiting for my FM to call me back today to firm up the plans. If all goes well, I will be hitting the road with my trainer Monday morning.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Jim M.'s Comment
member avatar

How exciting!!

I hope you can work out the logistics, positive thoughts... positive thoughts.

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