Local Burn Out, Missing The Chicken Lights & Chrome

Topic 30568 | Page 2

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Spaceman Spiff's Comment
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Currently watching a primate circle the block here in Vernon CA, memories.

Tony, I have only been out seven months driving OTR. Maybe I just haven't had the call return to me yet. Some of my work is rig driving, some days I drive a pick up and others a forklift in one of our warehouses. I suppose the variety could be shielding me from consistent burn out that you seem to be suffering from.

I definitely don't miss all the mountain and steep incline driving, chains and anti gel. There was some independent factor that was nice but I was suffering weight gain and all.

My gig now is strict Mon through Friday so I've been able to exercise, go to the beach and work on the house again. Those kinds of things just conquer all thoughts of OTR.

THAT BEING SAID, if I started over again for CDL training, I'd be right back at Prime in the solo flatbed division. I still count straps I see on trucks and pity the poor drivers tarping in the next lot while I wipe down my mirrors or something equally taxing.

Anne and old school, good to see familiar faces (profiles). Hope all is well. I'll post an update thread soon as to not hijack this guy's entirely.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Jon H.'s Comment
member avatar

I just don’t know if I can give up the local though. I’ve got kids and don’t want to be away from them... but I can’t help but feel this desire for “real trucking”. Any help here? What would you do

There are so many trucking jobs of all kinds available right now. Not just available, but actually bidding for drivers. I applied for 4 jobs online and i had recruiters coming out of the woodwork and they're still calling. I've only been driving since 2018. I work Monday to Friday days and the job comes with many perks. The company is very organized, has 24/7 maintenance, and is very safety oriented. Your choice isn't an either/or. If you have a clean MVR , you can get anything you want right now.

MVR:

Motor Vehicle Record

An MVR is a report of your driving history, as reported from your state Department of Motor Vehicles. Information on this report may include Drivers License information, point history, violations, convictions, and license status on your driving record.

Harvey C.'s Comment
member avatar

I'm not a driver but have posted here about my 23 year old son's experiences a few times and will just share what he is doing in case that is of any interest to you.

He got his CDL from a local private school (not the suggested route here but it got him enough of an idea if this was something he wanted to do after dropping out of college). He worked for CR England for 8 months, was forced to do team driving and his third partner was great but then that partner wanted to do regional driving back east so my son took a Dollar General refer dedicated route which had a lot of frustrations for him (broken equipment, waiting at stores for hours before they would let him unload, etc.) The pay for some of those weeks were low due to long detentions, broken equipment, etc. So he decided to look for driving jobs elsewhere.

He looked at DOT Transportation first. Very little written about that here but those who have driven for DOT are largely very happy with their work. DOT allows flexible work schedules and pay is good. Of course, if you take a job that is 4 days on and 3 days off, you make less than 5/2, etc. Not sure if they have openings in your area. My son applied for them but did not get hired, probably not enough experience with 7 months.

Next he applied with Marten Transportation after I pointed out a posting on Indeed to him. The recruiter steered him into a position that was a bit different than the one he was looking at. He has been at that for 4 months and typically is on the road for 12 days and off for about 2.5 days. He came home yesterday morning and asked him how he likes it at Marten and he replied "I love it." He drives a dedicated route for Nestle, though some other work sometimes gets mixed in. He drives out of Stockton yard, going from from stops mostly in Springville, Utah and some other stops in Utah, Jurupa Valley, CA, Tracy, CA, Lathrop, CA, Lemore, CA, and some trips to Oregon and southern Washington. He originally reported to the regional manager but a new DM got hired and he loves working with her and she lets her know she appreciates his efforts, etc. He makes a lot less than you, last week was about $1,550 with 3,000 miles (he gets 51 cpm plus detention and breakdown pay. In his second week his transmission had serious troubles and truck was in ship for most of the week and he got paid the minimum weekly pay of $1175, worked about 1.5 days. This week he had a hazmat load and will get paid some extra for that, not sure how much. He had a hiring bonus of $3,500 which was paid at 30, 60, and 120 days. I see some posting snow for much more. He gets to bring his truck home (usually just tractor) after submitting photos of where he would park it here on our farm (he lives at home). Besides his days off, he sometimes stops by here if he has extra time on his way to a next stop for shower or even sleeping a few times in the past four months. He drives a Kenworth T680 which took a bit of time to get used to (backs up faster, different noises) but he likes much better than the Cascadia he drove in with CR England.

There is such a demand for drivers that I would think you could find something that can work for you, except all the fancy lights.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Dedicated Route:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

BMI:

Body mass index (BMI)

BMI is a formula that uses weight and height to estimate body fat. For most people, BMI provides a reasonable estimate of body fat. The BMI's biggest weakness is that it doesn't consider individual factors such as bone or muscle mass. BMI may:

  • Underestimate body fat for older adults or other people with low muscle mass
  • Overestimate body fat for people who are very muscular and physically fit

It's quite common, especially for men, to fall into the "overweight" category if you happen to be stronger than average. If you're pretty strong but in good shape then pay no attention.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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