Thanks To Trucking Truth And Looking For Advice

Topic 30885 | Page 1

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TennesseeTom's Comment
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Want to thank the admin folks on TT for The High Road Training Program. Hands-down the best training program I found online, including the one CDL training program I paid for. Did not pass the General Knowledge my first time out. Buckled down to study and while looking for answers online, came across TT and THRTP. Easily passed all 3 tests needed in TN for my CDL permit. Thanks so much for THRTP and for TT website. Been able to read and learn a lot in a short amount of time.

Have been looking at where to go for CDL training to include company paid. I came across a local family owned company here in middle Tennessee named RE West. Went to their yard and met with a recruiter this week. They offer free training with no contract and only ask that I stay for 6 months. They do both van and flatbed and flatbed is 99% heavy-haul specialized and is where they have the greatest need for drivers. Training is 2 weeks in their yard, 3 weeks on road with a trainer and 1 week back in yard to learn securement. Pay is $.45cpm to start with quarterly reviews and they offer a $5k Veteran bonus paid out when I hit mileage goals.

I haven't been looking at heavy-haul as an option to begin as I thought I'd need experience to get into the field. I'm very excited about doing flatbed with this company and am reaching out to hear what folk's with experience and knowledge have to say. Community college in my area will take 7 1/2 weeks of schooling and cost about $2k. I can pay that, but prefer to keep it in the bank. I know there are several companies that will provide training with a 12-24 month obligation. Schneider will pay for schooling at the CC with a 12 month contract.

Thanks again for this website and looking forward to the advice that is sure to come and look forward to sharing my trucking journey.

Tom

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

45 CPM for flatbed and/or heavy haul?

First, no brand new driver should be doing heavy haul or tankers. Six weeks total training isn't enough training for that platform.

Second, you should broaden your job search. That's low wages.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

IDMtnGal 's Comment
member avatar

The reason we tell people to go with company training and then do a year or whatever the obligation is with the mega company, is because it takes that long to learn the ins-and-outs of driving, backing, trip planning and other nuances of driving. The bigger companies that train are self-insured, so when a trainee has an incident, and they WILL happen, they can evaluate that person and generally keep them on. A small company like the one you described will let you go because that is what the insurance company tells them to do.

Seven years ago I went with a small company that had dry vans. This was before ELD'S were mandatory and the school did not teach about logbooks. My first company taught me how to cheat on the logs. Not a good way to start and I believe it set me behind in being proficient. It took my third company, which had 150 trucks and electronic logs to really learn how to manage my clock, my trips, etc.

This company sounds good to you, but you don't know what you don't know. As PackRat said, beginner drivers should never drive tankers or do Heavy Haul until they have a year plus experience.

Company Sponsored Training

Laura

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Logbook:

A written or electronic record of a driver's duty status which must be maintained at all times. The driver records the amount of time spent driving, on-duty not driving, in the sleeper berth, or off duty. The enforcement of the Hours Of Service Rules (HOS) are based upon the entries put in a driver's logbook.

Electronic Logs:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

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