Advice For Newbie On A 10 Speed

Topic 31692 | Page 1

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Drew D.'s Comment
member avatar

Hey everyone, I know you are probably tired of hearing from me, but I am almost at the finish line.

I have a few questions regarding training in a 10 speed manual freightliner with an old Eaton Fuller transmission.

My instructor is teaching me exclusively how to float the gears versus double clutching. I only need to demonstrate one time that I can double clutch during my on road test. I have been at this for 2 days and while my shifting is getting better, I am still occasionally having a hard time finding the gears when I upshift and downshift and find myself rushing to 6th to stop myself from coasting.

I admittedly do panic and use too much of my awareness focusing on shifting versus other more important things going on around me.

So I guess my question is, any advice for a newbie when it comes to properly shifting and getting comfortable enough to make shifting second nature so I can focus on not coasting across railroad tracks? 😂😂

Thanks again!

Float The Gears:

An expression used to describe someone who is shifting gears without using the clutch at all. Drivers are taught to "Double Clutch" or press and release the clutch twice for each gear shift. If you're floating gears it means you're simply shifting without using the clutch at all.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Double Clutching:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Bird-One's Comment
member avatar

I’ve been in a manual truck my entire career so far. I still remember learning how to float for the first time and how much easier it made life. Once you get it down it becomes second nature.

Beat advice I can give is as soon as you miss a gear give it a good rev. Up to 1500 and what I did in the beginning is try to gently as I good push up against the gear that I was trying to get into until it slips in. Yes it will grind alittle but this is until a you get the hang of it. And when I say push you don’t have to push hard. And shouldn’t.

Sometimes it worked on the first try but most times in the beginning I’d have to do it a second time maybe third. Repetition will be the only way you’ll get good at it. So don’t sweat it. It will come. Just whatever you do don’t panic and try slamming it and muscling it into gear.

Drew D.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks! I did 1000% better today. Drove through downtown Boise twice today and into some mountain roads. My instructor has me starting from 2nd unloaded to get the motions right. My big issue today was missing 4th for some reason. I can downshift to 4th all day but floating up to it is a grind fest at least 50% of the time. Oddly enough, I hit 9th every time without fail. So its obviously an RPM and/or speed issue that I need to adapt to. 6th gear has been my savior if I screw up on the tail end of the lower gears.

Also, you are right about the panicking. I am getting better at downshifting before predictable stops and stop lights. I also tend to panic a bit and over rev the engine while trying to hit a gear to keep it from coasting. These are personal demons I need to work out.

Also, is it normal to feel a smidge of grinding in the shifter while floating? I still get the gear right. Just not always as smooth consistently.

Thanks!

I’ve been in a manual truck my entire career so far. I still remember learning how to float for the first time and how much easier it made life. Once you get it down it becomes second nature.

Beat advice I can give is as soon as you miss a gear give it a good rev. Up to 1500 and what I did in the beginning is try to gently as I good push up against the gear that I was trying to get into until it slips in. Yes it will grind alittle but this is until a you get the hang of it. And when I say push you don’t have to push hard. And shouldn’t.

Sometimes it worked on the first try but most times in the beginning I’d have to do it a second time maybe third. Repetition will be the only way you’ll get good at it. So don’t sweat it. It will come. Just whatever you do don’t panic and try slamming it and muscling it into gear.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

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